CleanTechnica is the #1 cleantech-focused
website
 in the world. Subscribe today!


Biofuels Image Credit: Algae via Flickr CC

Published on February 3rd, 2014 | by James Ayre

1

Solazyme Begins Commercial Production Of Algal Oil In The US

Share on Google+Share on RedditShare on StumbleUponTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on FacebookPin on PinterestDigg thisShare on TumblrBuffer this pageEmail this to someone

February 3rd, 2014 by  

The pioneering biofuels producer Solazyme recently made yet another important step towards its goal of offering a commercially and economically viable alternative to conventional sources of liquid fuels — the company has officially begun commercial production for the first time at its US facilities.

The two facilities — both the Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM) facility in Clinton, Iowa, and the American Natural Products (ANP) facility in Galva, Iowa — are expected to rapidly increase their production capacity over the next year/year and a half, potentially until they are handling up to 100,000 MT/yr.

Image Credit: Algae via Flickr CCImage Credit: Algae via Flickr CC


Green Car Congress provides more:

ADM and ANP have successfully manufactured three distinct tailored oil products at the facilities, and products are currently being sold and distributed in both the US and Brazil. Volumes shipped to Brazil are being utilized for market development activity in advance of the opening of the Solazyme Bunge Renewable Oils Moema facility. Production at the ADM and ANP facilities is expected to ramp to a nameplate capacity of 20,000 MT/yr within 12-18 months, with targeted potential expansion to 100,000 MT/yr in subsequent years.

Truckloads of product are now shipping from the Iowa operations for use in applications including lubricants, metalworking and home and personal care. These shipments are being made pursuant to multiple supply agreements as well as spot purchases, and include reorders.

It’ll be interesting to see if Solazyme can perform to company expectations and become economically profitably. The technology of producing liquid fuels directly from algae is certainly an interesting one, but a number of important questions remain with regard to its economic viability.

Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.



Share on Google+Share on RedditShare on StumbleUponTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on FacebookPin on PinterestDigg thisShare on TumblrBuffer this pageEmail this to someone

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,


About the Author

's background is predominantly in geopolitics and history, but he has an obsessive interest in pretty much everything. After an early life spent in the Imperial Free City of Dortmund, James followed the river Ruhr to Cofbuokheim, where he attended the University of Astnide. And where he also briefly considered entering the coal mining business. He currently writes for a living, on a broad variety of subjects, ranging from science, to politics, to military history, to renewable energy. You can follow his work on Google+.



  • dduggerbiocepts

    Technology and scaling for non-biofuel products have never really been the issue. For Solazyme investors, the question of SZYM having competitive economics in these relatively small specialty (niche) markets remain and are something on that only market competition and resulting margin shrinkage can answer over time.

Back to Top ↑