CleanTechnica is the #1 cleantech-focused
website
 in the world. Subscribe today!


Cars 585x409xChevy_Volt.jpg.pagespeed.ic.tDVvM4oTdg

Published on January 30th, 2014 | by Guest Contributor

4

Chevrolet Volt Testimonial

Share on Google+Share on RedditShare on StumbleUponTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on FacebookPin on PinterestDigg thisShare on TumblrBuffer this pageEmail this to someone

January 30th, 2014 by  

Originally published on GM-Volt.
By Jeff Cobb.

My Chevrolet Volt story began in 2010. After following news reports and releases about Chevrolet’s new E-REV in 2008, I became fascinated with the idea of owning and commuting with an automobile that had power and delivery and would put to rest the paradigm that electric vehicles could not keep up with gas guzzlers.

Chevy_Volt
In 2010, as GM announced a large introductory release of the premier battery-powered, electric motor drive vehicle with gas-generator backup, I became even more entranced with the idea that I might rarely ever have to pay for gasoline again. Gas was over $3.90 a gallon and rising and our options for automobile fuel was looking bleak. Ethanol was introduced or forced on drivers who did not know what they were putting in their tanks!

As a loyal, 23-year Chevrolet customer and an owner of a 2003 Silverado 2500HD, I felt it was my time to switch vehicles that would enable me to carry cargo, or people or both, and that it would involve a higher consumption of electricity vs. oil.

My wife and I looked at other “Hybrids” but none really seemed to solve the get-off-oil answer. They were more focused on barely increasing mpg. To me, mpg means you are filling a gas tank. That was not a solution. Before other electric cars were made available, Chevrolet (GM) was leading the charge, that we could have vehicles with more options.

Volt_owner

I could purchase an automobile that would get me to work and home on only electricity, and if I wanted to go on extended road trips over 100 miles, it would switch to gas! Wow! What a concept and shift from “old” to “new”. A vehicle that would allow us to transition to new technology. A technology that was not offered by any other affordable manufacturer in 2010!

My first Chevrolet Volt was a 2011, and I leased it in December 2010! Hands down. It was the BEST automobile I have ever owned!

I was skeptical before my test drive. It looked small (coming from a pick-up truck) and I was not sure it would drive like a European styled sports car. As I sat in the car and pushed the power button, I noticed the comfortable bucket seats fitting like a glove and the swoosh sound as the car powered on. I felt like I was sitting in a sporty starship! On the test drive, I had to test acceleration, cornering and braking!

I had a big smile as I noticed there was no gear shifting in the acceleration and the breaking was immediately responsive. My test drive led me through some pretty winding roads and I immediately noticed the wide wheel base and low center of gravity made the vehicle hug the road and not leave the lane as I steered.

My only complication was that it was out of my purchase price range, but I could afford to lease. It got me through Washington, D.C.’s snowmagedon, trips to South Carolina and two-hour commutes in D.C. daily. I loved this automobile from day one and never had a single complaint about it! I survived two fender benders with it, and was thankful for the super-safe cabin as rated by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. I really felt as secure in this car as I did my 2003 Silverado!

Volt_EVSE
My 2011 Chevy Volt three-year lease adventure was so awesome, I set my sites on purchasing the 2014 Chevy Volt. On December 23, 2013 my dream came true. Thanks to Clark Sharp at Pohanka Chevrolet, I am now the proud owner of a 2014 Volt which was priced right, $13,000 less than what I paid for my 2011 Volt.

I am at 740 commuting miles in my new vehicle, and I can tell you, I am receiving more compliments on this model than I did on the previous version.  If you like smart phones and tablets vs. PC towers and wired telephones, you will absolutely love the 2014 Chevrolet Volt! This car keeps you connected, on the battery or on the gas tank!

Volt_plugged_in
My goal is to drive from charging station to charging station and share with friends how many gallons of gas I purchase a year. I bet it will be less than 120 gallons ($430) a year, which is what I used to use every month at 1,440 gallons a year or $6,000. My electric bill averages $0.40 an hour at 8 hours per day ($3.20 daily or roughly $806.40 a year). These are my ball park figures based on my electric bill, paid charging through Chargepoint and gas receipts over the last three years.

Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.



Share on Google+Share on RedditShare on StumbleUponTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on FacebookPin on PinterestDigg thisShare on TumblrBuffer this pageEmail this to someone

Tags: , , , , , , , ,


About the Author

is many, many people. We publish a number of guest posts from experts in a large variety of fields. This is our contributor account for those special people. :D



  • tropicalday88

    Both the Volt and the Tesla will continue to improve over time. As well as the other electric vehicles. So to will natural gas which has actually been in service for some time and recently announced hydrogen fuel cell vehicles.
    This competition fuels innovation. A clear winner at this point would be our loss. Good for a few, very bad for the rest.

  • Bob Fearn

    Sure the Volt is a good car but if Tesla is able to build a similarly priced car that you can charge for free it will mean the end of Volt.

    • jonesy

      How long do you wait? We are talking about today, now. We can cross the bridge with Tesla – IF it ever happens

    • RuffHouse

      That’s kind of the beauty of the Volt’s drive-train design though. Once the battery tech and charging infrastructure is available at mass market prices, you just build a variant where you ditch the generator for a second battery bank. Boom.

      Sure the Volt product line might die (but surely live on in places with less charging infrastructure), but the factory, support, design and supply teams just roll over to the all electric version. The volt was a smart Bet for Chevy for just this reason.

Back to Top ↑