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Biomass Image Credit: Rice terrace in Philippines via Shutterstock

Published on June 29th, 2013 | by Worldwatch Institute

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Philippines Makes 100% Renewable Electricity In 10 Years Plan

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June 29th, 2013 by
 

This article first appeared on the website of the Worldwatch Institute (slightly different title, and image added).

Image Credit: Rice terrace in Philippines via Shutterstock

Image Credit: Rice terrace in Philippines via Shutterstock

Manila, Philippines—The Worldwatch Institute’s Climate and Energy Director, Alexander Ochs, met with the Climate Change Commission (CCC) and high-level representatives of the federal and provincial governments of the Philippines yesterday to lay groundwork for a Sustainable Energy Roadmap for the archipelago nation, which aims to shift its current electricity system to 100 percent renewable energy within a decade.

Climate Change Commissioner and former Senator Heherson Alvarez invited Ochs to present Worldwatch’s suggested methodology for a Sustainable Energy Roadmap, which takes an integrated approach to examining the technical, socioeconomic, financial and policy changes necessary for transitioning to a an energy system entirely based on energy efficiency, intelligent grid solutions and renewable supply.

“The Philippines is already a leader in geothermal and hydropower,” said Ochs. “But it’s essential now to chart a future that is socially, economically and environmentally sustainable and addresses the key challenge of providing affordable and reliable energy access for all Filipinos. With our Sustainable Energy Roadmap approach, Worldwatch will help to expand access to energy, address social needs, and advance economic development while protecting local environments and a stable global climate.”

To develop a Sustainable Energy Roadmap, Worldwatch analyzes an area’s potential for energy efficiency gains and undertakes detailed GIS mapping of local renewable energy resources, including biomass, solar, and wind. The Institute also produces an infrastructure inventory that assesses solutions for grid renovation and energy storage. In addition to technical analysis, the Roadmaps explore the socioeconomic impacts of diverse energy pathways, including the potential for sustainable energy development to create jobs and reduce electricity and healthcare costs. Worldwatch’s Roadmaps can be applied anywhere—in industrialized and developing countries—and at multiple levels of political organization, from the municipal to the regional.

CCC Commissioner Alvarez said the government “is concerned with the latest scientific reports that global warming has accelerated, and believes the country must begin to program a path from low carbon to zero carbon along a broad partnership of the public interest and private sector.” Alvarez added that a sustainable energy system will require significant cooperation between international finance, government and private institutions.

“This country has an enormous opportunity to demonstrate how smart and integrated energy planning can be done in the 21st century,” said Ochs. “Any country in the world has great potential for at least one renewable resource, such as biomass, geothermal, hydro, ocean, solar or wind. The Philippines has them all, as well as the human resources, technological know-how, and political leadership necessary to make a low-emissions transition a reality within less than a generation.”

Worldwatch’s Climate and Energy program identifies key components of energy and transportation systems that de-carbonize our economies, boost energy efficiency, spur innovation and job creation, address resource scarcity, and reduce local environmental pollution. Learn more about the Institute’s Sustainable Energy Roadmaps: Guiding the Global Shift to Domestic Renewables and the recently released The Way Forward for Renewable Energy in Central America.

Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.

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analyzes interdisciplinary environmental data from around the world, providing information on how to build a sustainable society.



  • 許文輔

    There is no road map associated with the 2020 100% RE plan.
    I doubt the CCC of Philippines knows the difficulties or not.
    Of course I favor there is country in the world has such ambitious,
    but in reality, if there is no road map of potential renewable energies,
    I don’t think they can reach this goal.

  • Aviel1

    Right!! I live here in the Philippines now for 4 years, I have a Non-Profit aimed at teaching young and old alike the challenges and necessities of keeping our environment clean, setting up Sanctuaries to help prevent over fishing as well as many other programs.

    After 4 years, what we have established::

    1.People are still burning their trash, rather than bringing it to the nearest collection area

    2. Most of the Population still uses their hand and water to wipe their Ass after they use the restroom.

    3. Still can not get Sanctuary started even though it will be 100% commissioned through the Non-Profit. Why? Because the people say the fish will go into the Sanctuary and not come back out. They also say that Sea Turtles breath water so they continue to leave their nets out all night, catching and drowning the turtles. Not to mention they are still using Dynamite and Cyanide to fish in many places in the Philippines, but no one gets arrested because the police are told not to. ( because the politicians are afraid they will lose votes at upcoming elections if people are arrested)

    4. They are still polluting their Oceans and Rivers with toxic runoff as well as industrial waste.

    5. The homeless are still Ignored by the Govt.and Birth Control is Non -existent. Because they are a Govt. controlled by the Church!

    Conclusion:: The Philippines will always be a third world Trash pile, mostly due to Corruption, Ignorance and Stupidity . The school system ever since the Marco s Regime has been “Keep the People Dumb” . Because a dumb population can not cause as many revolutions as an educated one. The people refuse to listen to anyone besides their own mostly because of Pride and Stupidity. We have members of the Peace Corp. come to our Non-Profit and complain about the same problems they have in getting programs initiated here. Same goes for the U.S. Military running into same ignorance and Pride in trying to teach their troops.
    To this day the University of Manila has still not changed it’s curriculum, which was modified (DOWN) during Marco s!!

    They will Never, Ever be able to accomplish such a Feat.

    • Bob_Wallace

      “Most of the Population still uses their hand and water to wipe their Ass after they use the restroom.”

      There’s no problem with that practice as long as people wash their hands afterwards.

      People in the west use paper, but fecal contamination is commonly found on bathroom door knobs, TV remote controls, etc.

      Hands and water saves paper. That’s a good thing.

      You can make a difference. You can make things change. Educate the younger folks. Use social media to bypass organizations which are reluctant to listen to new ideas. Recruit some young computer smart people and some with artistic and musical skills. Put them together to get out the message.

  • Klaus Biesel

    Good luck with that. The street construction ( 500 meters) in front of our subdivision is an ongoing process since January 2. 2013 ….

    • Aviel1

      I know what you are talking about!! Pathetic System!!

  • Matt

    Yes, going 100% for electric is only the first step ;)
    But a very big one and the Philippines need to be cheered for it. But yes please, update the headline.

  • earthpuppy

    Unfortunately, they have decided to include biomass energy in the mix. Burning up the biosphere is short-sighted, more Co2 intensive than fossil fuels, more polluting, and far from sustainable. https://www.commondreams.org/view/2010/02/10-9

    • JamesWimberley

      It depends. If you start from grassland or scrub as in the Brazilian Planalto, plant fast-growing eucalyptus on a 10-year cycle, and burn the wood for power, indefinitely, the scheme is carbon-neutral. Whether it’s good for biodiversity, amenity, water management, and food production is another matter and there are likely conflicts. At the other extreme,.if you just clear-cut old-growth forests for the biomass, the scheme is a net carbon emitter as well as bad in other environmental ways. Corn ethanol is close to this.

      Smolkow (the linked source) is right that you can’t allow double counting: the eucalyptus plantation should not be available for a carbon offset.

  • http://xeeme.com/MrEnergyCzar MrEnergyCzar

    They are a net importer of oil now… that’s the real long term headline….

    MrEnergyCzar

  • JamesWimberley

    The headline is misleading. The Philippines plan to get to 100% renewable electricity, not energy. It’s still impressively ambitious compared to the USA, the EU, China or indeed anybody else but Norway and a very few like-minded countries..

    • Jouni Valkonen

      Yes, it is frustrating when people just cannot comprehend that energy is wider concept than just electricity. This distinction becomes even more important and more overlapping when the electrification of transportation begins at large scale.

      • JamesWimberley

        Fortunately the electricity used by vehicles can be very largely supplied from off-peak generation, with a minimally smart grid. This smoothing will greatly reduce – but not eliminate – the need for net new generating capacity above current peak requirements. The same goes for power-to-gas and power-to-gasoline plants when they reach large-scale deployment.

    • Ross

      In Norway’s case they have it easy as there’s is mostly hydro.

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