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Boats planetsolar Boston2

Published on June 25th, 2013 | by Amber Archangel

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PlanetSolar — World’s Largest Solar Boat — Arrives in Boston!

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June 25th, 2013 by
 

This article first appeared on 1sun4all. MS Tûranor PlanetSolar, the world’s largest solar-powered boat, with her crew and scientists onboard, arrived in Boston to continue her 2013 “PlanetSolar DeepWater” expedition. Education days are planned for the stopover in Boston. The Gulf Stream tracking will continue as her next voyage takes her to the Far North, where she will put into port in St. John’s, Canada and then on to Reykjavik, Iceland and Bergen, Norway. The following is from PlanetSolar.

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PlanetSolar arrives in Boston, June 22, 2013 | © All rights reserved Planet Solar

June 24, 2013 — Fan Pier Marina, Boston (United States). After Miami and New York, the MS Tûranor PlanetSolar reached Boston on June 22 with scientists from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) onboard. The researchers are sailing on the largest solar boat ever built in order to successfully carry out the ‘PlanetSolar DeepWaterexpedition, which aims to analyze the Gulf Stream, one of the most important regulators of European and North American climates.

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PlanetSolar arrives in Boston, June 22, 2013 | © All rights reserved Planet Solar

To mark the third leg of the American tour, the PlanetSolar and UNIGE teams will strengthen their interaction with important institutions such as the Boston Children’s Museum, the Boston Museum of Science, the Greentown Labs, the MIT Energy Club, and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, and will offer a series of events to raise public awareness about climate issues. Stopover from 22 to 27 June 2013.

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Solar Boston, June 22, 2013 | © All rights reserved Planet Solar

The capital of Massachusetts is recognized in particular for its research programs in the fields of technology and oceanography, and many institutions are heavily involved in sustainable development. PlanetSolar and UNIGE have the opportunity to communicate the stakes of the ‘DeepWater’ expedition by organizing a series of events with support from Swissnex Boston. For example, children will be able to participate in the construction of a model solar boat at a workshop at the Boston Children’s Museum; public conferences will be held with researchers from UNIGE, the MIT Energy Club, and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute; a temporary exhibition will be displayed at the Boston Science Museum, etc.

‘This project fits perfectly with our University’s missions: education, research, and service to the community. Geneva is the birthplace of global governance, therefore her involvement in such an adventure was inherent. In fact, at the heart of the city of Calvin, international organizations and key decision makers are addressing the challenges of climate change’, says Jean-Dominique Vassalli, rector of UNIGE.

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PlanetSolar is docked in Boston, June 22, 2013 | ©All rights reserved Planet Solar

The ‘PlanetSolar DeepWater’ scientific expedition will continue along the east coast

Launched in Florida at the beginning of the month, the ‘PlanetSolar DeepWater’ exhibition seeks to collect a continuous series of physical and biological measures along the Gulf Stream, both in the water and in the air, using advanced instruments with the expertise of UNIGE scientists. Headed by Professor Martin Beniston, climatologist and director of the Institute of Environmental Sciences at UNIGE, the research team is studying the key parameters of climate regulation, namely aerosols and phytoplankton, in order to improve our understanding of complex interactions between the ocean and atmosphere, as well as the role these interactions play in climate change.

After the Boston stopover, the boat will continue its route along the Gulf Stream until reaching St-John’s, Canada. Then, the catamaran will set out to conquer the northernmost part of the Atlantic.

About PlanetSolar

The MS Tûranor PlanetSolar, built in Kiel, Germany, is a catamaran powered exclusively by solar energy. On May 4, 2012, after sailing for 584 days, the MS Tûranor PlanetSolar completed the first solar-powered trip around the world.

For her 2013 expeditions, the MS Tûranor PlanetSolar underwent major maintenance operations. The MS Tûranor PlanetSolar’s crew is comprised of: Gérard d’Aboville (Captain), Andrew Mikkelsen (Second), Antoine Simon (electrical engineer), Hugo Buratti (seaman and steward), and Vincent Brunet (steward). During the ‘PlanetSolar DeepWater’ expedition, the UNIGE scientific team rounds out the crew.

After leaving Las Palmas (Spain) on April 26, 2013, the catamaran reached St. Martin (French West Indies) 22 days later. The MS Tûranor PlanetSolar therefore broke her own world record speed for a solar-powered transatlantic crossing, set in 26 days during her trip around the world in 2010.

In order to fund the 2013 campaign, PlanetSolar SA is supported by the University of Geneva, Ciel électricité, Switcher, the Swiss AOC-IGP Association, Younicos, Plantbacter, Actides, GoPro, Jean-René Germanier SA, BCCC Attorneys-at-Law, Tempur, Hempel, Présence Suisse, Energissima, l’UIM, YELLO, and Waste Free Oceans.

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PlanetSolar Via Long Island Sound, June 20, 2013 | ©All rights reserved Planet Solar

Author’s note: As this graceful, renewable energy lady of the sea left New York, a member of her crew wrote this on the ship’s blog: “All of us on both sides of the Atlantic, in New York and Geneva, worked hard on the science for the coming cruise legs off the Canadian coast when our teams will grasp the opportunity to study the whirlpools that the Gulf Stream is kind enough to create for us in this area. Stay tuned!” You can follow the voyage of the solar-powered boat at: www.planetsolar.org/follow-us/itinerary-2013.

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About the Author

-- I am an artist, painter, writer, interior designer, and graphic designer, constant student of many studies and founder of 1Sun4All.com. Living with respect for the environment close at hand, the food chain, natural remedies for healing, the earth, people and animals is a life-long expression and commitment. As half of a home-building team, I helped design and build harmonious, sustainable and net-zero homes that incorporate clean air systems, passive and active solar energy as well as rainwater collection systems. Private aviation stirs a special appeal, I would love to fly in the solar airplane and install a wind turbine in my yard. I am a peace-loving, courageous soul, and I am passionate about contributing to the clean energy revolution.



  • Chelsea Richards

    People have been utilizing solar power to cruise for many years. It’s not surprising to know that everyone knows where the wind comes from. It appears to me that it might be more proficient and faster to have poles with sails and have the sun based boards on the sails.
    MotionModels.com

  • Wayne Williamson

    I keep wondering if container ships could be powered by solar, but the most horse power I come up with is 4000 (400mx50m=20000m2@100watt=2mw/500=4000hp) and of course that would only be in the middle of the day, dead in the water for 18 hours. Tried to find out what kind of engines they use but not easily found(5 minute search;-)

    Also 10000 panels would run about 5 million(all number are very rough).

    Just a thought…..

    • Kendolph

      It was my first though when I saw this ship long time ago. But those 4000hp are kind of far far far far far cry from the ~80 MW needed to push a container ship :)

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