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Crowdfunding nanolight

Published on February 4th, 2013 | by Zachary Shahan

3

World’s Most Efficient LED Bulb?

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February 4th, 2013 by Zachary Shahan 

The NanoLight is claimed to be the most efficient LED bulb, according to its creators. It’s also omni-direction, turns on instantly, doesn’t get very hot, doesn’t get worn out when turned on and off frequently, and certainly has a unique look:

Here’s a chart regarding how it compares to other bulbs in lumens per watt:

“The NanoLight has been extensively tested using professional lighting bulb test equipment in order to ensure brightness distribution, sufficient luminous output and color temperature,” the company writes on its website. And on its Kickstarter page, it notes: “Using only 12 watts of electricity, the NanoLight generates over 1600 lumens, equivalent to a 100W incandescent lightbulb.”

Regarding that bit about the bulb not getting too hot, here’s some clarification:

Most LED light bulbs or CFL’s have a problem of overheating within a fully enclosed fixture, which causes the LEDs to start failing well before their expected lifetime. The reason for this is that these fixtures do not allow for sufficient air flow, thus trapping the heat inside and overheating the bulbs. We cannot claim that the NanoLight will work in absolutely all enclosures, but we can say that the NanoLight emits less than half the heat energy as compared to other LED bubs or CFLs. The chance of overheating is far lessened. After receiving various question regarding fixtures, we realized that these bulbs are going to end up in all kinds of installations. Of course, we want to make sure that the customer gets a long life out of these bulbs so that they pay for themselves over the long run. As a result,we are happy to announce that we have added overheat protection as a standard feature of every bulb. If the bulb gets too hot for whatever reason, it will automatically dim itself to prevent damage or shortened life.

If this bulb is all it’s cracked up to be, it could have a bright future. (Yes, bad pun intended.)

I’m not sure if it’s the efficiency or the unique look, or both, but over $130,000 have now been raised over on Kickstarter for this bulb, blasting past its $20,000 target. If you want to join the early funders and get yourself one of the first bulbs (or simply to learn more), head on over to the NanoLight Kickstarter page.

You can also learn more on the NanoLight website.

–> Also recommended for you: Energy-efficient Lighting Market in Europe to 2020 – LEDs Emerge as Key Growth Sector due to Price Discounting and Phosphor Shortages Restricting CFL Production

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About the Author

spends most of his time here on CleanTechnica as the director/chief editor. Otherwise, he's probably enthusiastically fulfilling his duties as the director/editor of Solar Love, EV Obsession, Planetsave, or Bikocity. Zach is recognized globally as a solar energy, electric car, and wind energy expert. If you would like him to speak at a related conference or event, connect with him via social media. You can connect with Zach on any popular social networking site you like. Links to all of his main social media profiles are on ZacharyShahan.com.



  • mzso

    :DDD

    Looking at the higher res picture closely it seems they’re using the same types of leds I made my LED light source from. ( http://www.ebay.com/itm/50-Pcs-1W-High-Power-Cool-White-Led-Lamp-Beads-90-100-Lm-5000K-/330722723619?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item4d009c4723 ) They probably ordered the same thing from ebay. :)

    I made mine from 40 leds as a strip 150 mA instead of 300. They probably underdrive them about as much.

  • Rick

    It’s worth noting that these bulbs have a color temperature of 4000K. Many will consider this too blue/cold for at least residential use.

    • mzso

      4000-4500k I estimate is about what I’d like most (but can’t get at this time). I dislike the yellow (mocked as warm-white) that most light sources produce.

      Cold white is not that good either outside bathroom/kitchen.

      (It only really gets blue above 6500K. 6000-6500 is sterile white)

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