CleanTechnica is the #1 cleantech-focused
website
 in the world. Subscribe today!


Cars 20130111-003721.jpg

Published on January 11th, 2013 | by James Ayre

9

Electric Vehicles Selling Fast In Norway, Thanks To Strong Incentives

Share on Google+Share on RedditShare on StumbleUponTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on FacebookPin on PinterestDigg thisShare on TumblrBuffer this pageEmail this to someone

January 11th, 2013 by
 
 
Electric car sales have been booming in Norway, largely thanks to the many strong incentives there to buy one. In the US, electric and hybrid vehicle sales for 2012 made up only 0.6% of new vehicle sales, but in Norway they topped 5.2%.

20130111-003721.jpg

Total sales for EVs reached 50,000 for all of 2012 in the US, with its large population of 315 million. While Norway, with its population of only 5 million, sold over 10,000 EVs in the same time period.

Electric cars such as the Nissan Leaf are very popular in Norway, and there are more reservations for Tesla’s Model S there than anywhere else in the European market.

The simple reason for the popularity of EVs in Norway is price. Typically, EVs are a good bit more expensive than conventional cars. “But, in a nation where high car taxes are the norm, the Norwegian government doesn’t levy import taxes on EVs,” Autoblog Green writes. “The competitive pricing has helped the Nissan Leaf become 13th best selling vehicle in Norway. The country also has a long history with EVs, and it’s common to see Revas, Kewet Buddies and many other EVs on the streets of Oslo, the capitol.”


 
There are also many governmental policies that contribute to the high rate of EV adoption there, including: being allowed to drive in the bus lane, free parking in many areas in the city, and avoiding the congestion charges that conventional car owners are subject to. There is also a highly developed infrastructure in the country, with more than 3,500 charging posts and 100 fast-charging stations in the small nation.

The fast rate of change in Norway shows what could be possible in the US, or at the very least some regions of it, if similar incentives were adopted. With such a high percentage of CO2 emissions coming from the internal combustion engines of cars, a rapid switch over to electric and hybrid vehicles would be very valuable in limiting the most negative effects of future climate change.

Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.

Print Friendly

Share on Google+Share on RedditShare on StumbleUponTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on FacebookPin on PinterestDigg thisShare on TumblrBuffer this pageEmail this to someone

Tags: , , , , , , , ,


About the Author

's background is predominantly in geopolitics and history, but he has an obsessive interest in pretty much everything. After an early life spent in the Imperial Free City of Dortmund, James followed the river Ruhr to Cofbuokheim, where he attended the University of Astnide. And where he also briefly considered entering the coal mining business. He currently writes for a living, on a broad variety of subjects, ranging from science, to politics, to military history, to renewable energy. You can follow his work on Google+.



  • Pingback: Nissan Leaf Sales Are Booming In Norway -- Second Best-Selling Car In April | CleanTechnica

  • Pingback: Nissan Leaf 2nd-Highest Sales Of Any Car In Norway In April −

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=839410060 Benjamin Myklebust

    The lesson from Norway is that people want to buy and drive EVs when the price is comparable to a conventional, fossil one.

    *There are only about 50 fast charging stations in Norway, not 100.

  • reva fan

    Yes, its a Reva…. fantastic car. they r launching a new model. reva e2o… check it out!

  • Ronald Brak

    If the Nissin Leaf is popular that’s surprising, as it’s extremely expensive in Europe. In Australia the Leaf costs twice as much as it does in the US and I believe it’s about the same in Europe.

  • Kelsey

    Hi Nathan!

    This is a great article. I’d be interested in printing it in my newspaper, the Norwegian American Weekly. Send me an email kelsey@norway.com if interested!

  • SecularAnimist

    What are the two little cars in the foreground of the photo?

Back to Top ↑