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Clean Power PV-Preisindex - Photovoltaikumfrage.de - photovoltaik-guide.de - Oktober 2012

Published on November 29th, 2012 | by Zachary Shahan

5

Solar Graph Porn

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November 29th, 2012 by Zachary Shahan 

 
This article has been reposted from Solar Love with full permission:

Someone recently passed along these great graphs from a German website (you can see an English translation of the webpage they came from here). The overall message: solar PV prices in Germany have dropped considerably in the past few years (as installation has boomed), and the prices are pretty darn low these days.

More specifically, note that the graphs are not for the same time period — they are sequential. So, basically, the price just dropped and dropped and dropped and dropped. (The same thing is happening in the US, just not as fast, since installation isn’t happening as fast and because of some other factors, like balance of system or “soft” costs and subsidies.)

Take a look at the graphs below and let me know if anything else comes to mind for you (note: prices are per kWp for plants up to 100 kWp solar power plants):

October 2012

 

Amazing, isn’t it?

And here’s the price history in list form (again, prices are per kWp for plants up to 100 kWp solar power plants):

Month PV Price
January 2009 € 4,110
February 2009 € 3,930
March 2009 € 3,820
April 2009 € 3,740
May 2009 € 3,500
June 2009 € 3,500
July 2009 € 3,390
August 2009 € 3,230
September 2009 € 3,110
October 2009 € 3,050
November 2009 € 2,950
December 2009 € 3,060
January 2010 € 3,040
February 2010 € 2,970
March 2010 € 3,030
April 2010 € 2,930
May 2010 € 2,890
June 2010 € 2,840
July 2010 € 2,580
August 2010 € 2,610
September 2010 € 2,540
October 2010 € 2,500
November 2010 € 2,510
December 2010 € 2,470
January 2011 € 2,480
February 2011 € 2,390
March 2011 € 2,350
April 2011 € 2,390
May 2011 € 2,370
June 2011 € 2,300
July 2011 € 2,210
August 2011 € 2,170
September 2011 € 2,120
October 2011 € 2,090
November 2011 € 1,960
December 2011 € 1,950
January 2012 € 1,990
February 2012 € 1,960
March 2012 € 1,990
April 2012 € 1,900
May 2012 € 1,870
June 2012 € 1,740
July 2012 € 1,720
August 2012 € 1,630
September 2012 € 1,610
October 2012 € 1,600

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About the Author

spends most of his time here on CleanTechnica as the director/chief editor. Otherwise, he's probably enthusiastically fulfilling his duties as the director/editor of Solar Love, EV Obsession, Planetsave, or Bikocity. Zach is recognized globally as a solar energy, electric car, and wind energy expert. If you would like him to speak at a related conference or event, connect with him via social media. You can connect with Zach on any popular social networking site you like. Links to all of his main social media profiles are on ZacharyShahan.com.



  • derekbolton

    Apart from the first few datapoints, it’s a remarkably good fit to a decline of 20%pa, right up to now. But I’m not sure whether these numbers are in today’s Euros or the actual numeric prices at the time. If the latter, the real decline is steeper.

  • Ronald Brak

    There is no particular reason why other countries can’t also install solar for $2 a watt with a little lead time. As many countries have lower labour costs than Germany they should be able to do it for less. This means there is no real reason point of use solar can’t be cheaper than grid electricity for most of the world’s people. The problem of how to cheaply produce low emission electricity during the day has been solved. It’s just a matter of deployment.

    • Bob_Wallace

      $2/watt is the goal that PBO and Secretary Chu have set. Through Department of Energy programs multiple innovative programs are being funded and significant prizes established for the first three companies to break the $2/watt threshold.

      “Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the SunShot Prize aims to spur low-cost rooftop solar installations across the nation. This competition offers a total of up to $10 million in cash awards to the first three teams that repeatedly demonstrate an average of $1 per watt (W) for non-hardware costs such as permitting, interconnection, and inspection.”
      http://www1.eere.energy.gov/solar/sunshot/prize.html

      When I first heard about the contest I thought it would be years before any payout. Now that we’re approaching $3/watt I can see it happening in the next 2-3 years.

  • FromOz

    “prices are for 100 kWp solar power plants”

    Please put in a bit more effort. Nowhere does the original article say that these are the prices for 100 kWp plants. One minute of calculation and reflection should have made you realise that that couldn’t be the case. As the article clearly states, these are prices per kWp for plants up to 100 kWp.

    A bit more reluctance to grope for the word “porn” might also help the quality of your reporting.

    • anderlan

      Thank you for doing the work the author should have done, or clearly explaining things (also the job of the blog article author). I was very amazed for a moment that I could put up 100kW of panels for $3000!!!

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