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Clean Power Electricity Tariff for Residents Near Wind Turbines

Published on November 21st, 2012 | by Joshua S Hill

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Good Energy Introduces 1st UK Local Electricity Tariff

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November 21st, 2012 by
 
 
In an unconventional move, UK energy company Good Energy announced Monday it new Local Tariff, available for households living within two kilometres of the company’s flagship wind farm, the 9.2 megawatt farm in Delabole (north Cornwall).

Residents within the two-kilometre zone will qualify for the new tariff, which offers a 20% discount on standard electricity prices; enough to save the average Good Energy customer around £100 over a year. The discount will be available to current and new customers from early 2013, and will also pay out a ‘windfall’ credit of up to £50 per household every year that the turbines exceed their expected performance.

Electricity Tariff for Residents Near Wind Turbines

The Delabole wind farm

“I’m proud that Good Energy is leading the UK wind industry with a new model ensuring that people who live near our wind farms share in their success,” Juliet Davenport, CEO of Good Energy, said. “Wind power has a huge role to play in meeting the UK’s future energy needs, and we think that it’s only right that our local communities should be recognised for their contribution to tackling climate change and reducing the UK’s reliance on expensive imported fossil fuels.”

The Local Tariff will also be available at upcoming wind farm sites as they are developed. Good Energy is hoping to install 110 megawatts of new renewable sites by 2016, and this new tariff will help the local communities benefit further.

“When we researched opinion in the local community, there was a very positive response from residents with 68% of those surveyed saying they would consider switching to a Good Energy Local Tariff once the benefits were explained to them,” explained Davenport. “This response is in line with the many inspiring community projects, such as Gigha in the Hebrides which generates two thirds of its own electricity with three wind turbines which are owned by the community.”
 

 
And if hearing that the residents are happy from the executives isn’t enough for you, here is Susan Theobald, local Delabole resident: “Renewable energy projects have always been very close to my heart. I feel that people living in close proximity to wind turbines would be more sympathetic to this form of renewable energy if they were to gain some advantage from it, such as a favourable local tariff’.”

Source: Good Energy

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About the Author

I'm a Christian, a nerd, a geek, a liberal left-winger, and believe that we're pretty quickly directing planet-Earth into hell in a handbasket! I work as Associate Editor for the Important Media Network and write for CleanTechnica and Planetsave. I also write for Fantasy Book Review (.co.uk), Amazing Stories, the Stabley Times and Medium.   I love words with a passion, both creating them and reading them.



  • 1tara_g

    Hi Joshua,
    Thanks for this article. I’m always interested in hearing about community renewable energy projects likes this: has to be the way forward, in terms of reducing greenhouse gases, but also freedom from the clutches of the greedy Big Six energy companies. I have also written about community solar projects in the UK where locals get a say and a stake in local energy generation. I think there is a lot of potential power here – if communities are willing to work together.

    Keep up the good work!
    Tara Gould

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