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Consumer Technology Philips A21 LED

Published on October 30th, 2012 | by Elizabeth Smyth

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Philips Launches LED Retrofit Lamps

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October 30th, 2012 by  

 
Last week, Philips announced the release of three new types of LED bulbs for its LED retrofit line. These new bulbs will help users experience the benefits of LED lighting while replicating the characteristics of the traditional light bulbs they replace.

Philips A21 LED

The first bulb, the DimTone BR30, is designed for the hospitality and restaurant industries. As its name suggests, this bulb is designed to work with the BR30 lighting socket. The bulb itself offers diffuse, omnidirectional lighting; it is ideally suited to work as a light source for recessed and track lighting. Philips has included an improved driver with this bulb, increasing its compatibility with pre-existing dimmers to provide superior dimming performance. Thanks to LED technology, it can provide a satisfying lighting experience while using significantly less energy and lasting up to 12 times as long as a traditional bulb it replaces.
 

 
The second bulb, the A21 22-watt, will be one of the first viable LED replacements for a commercial 100-watt bulb. The LEDs included in this bulb replicate the warm color temperature of a traditional incandescent bulb while drawing up to 78 percent less power; the bulb has already been submitted to Energy Star for certification. Additionally, this bulb can last up to 25 times longer than a normal 100-watt incandescent bulb. Businesses and individuals can save more than $200 per bulb by converting their old incandescent bulbs to the A21. As with the BR30, this bulb includes Philips’ latest driver and is compatible with most dimmers.

Finally, Philips introduced an LED T8 replacement lamp. This lamp will be interchangeable with existing T8 fluorescent fixtures and includes an external driver. This external driver is engineered to use the same wiring as the external ballasts for traditional T8 lamps. Philips’ new LED lamps will use up to 35 percent less electricity than traditional T8 bulbs and will last for up to 50,000 hours of continuous use. The new lamps are DLC compliant and qualify for many energy rebate programs, allowing new owners to recoup some of the cost of upgrading to these lamps.

Source: Philips Lighting

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About the Author

is a writer for Precision Paragon, an energy efficient commercial lighting manufacturer and a leading source for lighting retrofit solutions.



  • TJ

    Good to know a 100 watt replacement will soon be available for the retail market …

    • Bob_Wallace

      I googled to see who was selling. Home Depot has a page ready to go, but doesn’t yet have any stock.

      Even though I’ve got several years worth of CFLs on the shelf I’ll probably buy one just to see how well they work.

      • http://cleantechnica.com/ Zachary Shahan

        Good work. Happy they’re set & ready to roll. :D

  • http://twitter.com/mathew mathew

    You might want to correct the spelling of “Philips” throughout the article. The weird thing is, you got it right in the headline…

    • http://cleantechnica.com/ Zachary Shahan

      Thanks. :D

    • John Barksdale

      Actually the full name is Royal Dutch Philips. I guess they drop the “royal” part in America because royalty is anachronistic nonsense. These yellow LED “bug lights” look terrible when off and have a slight delay when they are switched on.

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