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Published on October 13th, 2012 | by James Ayre

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Black Silicon Solar Cell Hits 18.2% Efficiency, Should Help to Reduce Costs

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Black-silicon solar cells with 18.2% efficiency have been created by researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). These don’t need extra anti-reflection layers (like typical solar cells do), which should help to significantly lower the cost of solar energy.

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The specially designed nanostructured surface ensures that the light-generated electricity is still collectable in an efficient way from the solar cell, while still conferring the inherent advantages of a ‘black silicon‘ material.

“The researchers made nano-islands of silver on a silicon wafer and immersed it briefly in liquids to make billions of nano-sized holes in each square-inch of the silicon wafer surface,”an NREL news release states. “The holes and silicon walls are smaller than the light wavelengths hitting them, so the light doesn’t recognize any sudden change in density at the surface and, thus, don’t reflect back into the atmosphere as wasted energy. The researchers controlled the nanoshapes and the chemical composition of the surface to reach record solar cell efficiencies for this ‘black silicon’ material.”

Regularly, solar cell manufacturers need to add an additional anti-reflection layer, sometimes even more than one, to their cells; this raises the manufacturing costs considerably.

In previous research, NREL has shown that its nanostructures reflect significantly less light than even the best anti-reflection layers currently used. It had previously been unable to achieve overall conversion efficiencies that could challenge other solar cells with these ‘black-silicon’ solar cells, however.

To reach these efficiencies, the researchers first needed to resolve why having an increased surface area on the nanostructure-featuring solar cells drastically reduced the gathering of electricity current.

“Their experiments demonstrated that the high-surface area, and especially a process called Auger recombination, limit the collection of photons on most nanostructured solar cells. They concluded that this Auger recombination is caused when too many of the dopant impurities put in to make the cell work come through the nanostructured surface,” NREL states.

“This scientific understanding enabled them to suppress Auger recombination with lighter and shallower doping. Combining this lighter doping with slightly smoother nanoshapes, they can build an 18.2%-efficient solar cell that is black but responds nearly ideally to almost the entire solar spectrum.”

Branz added: “The next challenges are to translate these results to common industrial practice and then get the efficiency over 20%. After that, I hope to see these kinds of nanostructuring techniques used on far thinner cells to use less semiconductor material.”

The research was just published on the website of Nature Nanotechnology.

Source: NREL
Image Credits: Black Silicon via Wikimedia Commons

Reposted from Solar Love with permission.






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About the Author

's background is predominantly in geopolitics and history, but he has an obsessive interest in pretty much everything. After an early life spent in the Imperial Free City of Dortmund, James followed the river Ruhr to Cofbuokheim, where he attended the University of Astnide. And where he also briefly considered entering the coal mining business. He currently writes for a living, on a broad variety of subjects, ranging from science, to politics, to military history, to renewable energy. You can follow his work on Google+.



  • http://www.cinemaviz.com film streaming

    humm, They’re making the holes mechanically, but how much more expensive would it be to “print” them like an integrated circuit? film streaming

  • http://profiles.google.com/vandammes James Van Damme

    I’ve built and used anechoic rooms at microwave frequencies (300-10000 MHz) that use the same principle. But the cones are much neater, and reflect much less energy (0.01%). It’s harder making them at sub-visible wavelengths.

    They’re making the holes mechanically, but how much more expensive would it be to “print” them like an integrated circuit?

  • StefanoR99

    Cool stuff but how far away is it from being a commercial product that you can buy and install on your roof?

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