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Clean Power Denmark Renewables Account for 40 Percent

Published on September 28th, 2012 | by Joshua S Hill

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Denmark Renewable Energy Generation 40.7% of Electricity Produced in 2011, Wind Energy 28.1%

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September 28th, 2012 by
 
The Danish Energy Agency announced earlier this week that consumption of renewable energy had increased in 2011 by 2.5% thanks in part to a big push in wind-power production. Based on the European Union method of calculation, Denmark saw renewable energy account for 23.6% of energy consumption in 2011, at the same time that electricity production based on renewable energy accounted for 40.7% of domestic electricity produced in the country.

Wind power accounted for 28.1% of electricity produced in 2011.

Denmark Renewables Account for 40 Percent

Observed energy consumption actually dropped in 2011 by 6.4%, bringing it back almost to the levels it had been at back in 1990. Considering that the 2008 energy agreement Denmark signed called for a drop in adjusted gross energy consumption of just 2% from 2006 to 2011, the full 6.6% drop is truly marvellous.

Another interesting fact to pull out of the numbers is that, while the national GDP grew by 0.8% in 2011, energy efficiency improved by 1.7% over the same period. Subsequently, energy efficiency improvements over the past two decades have allowed for each unit of GDP to require 28.5% less energy in 2011 than in 1990.

The amount of observed CO2 emissions caused by energy consumption in the country fell in 2011 by 10.6% to just 44.3 million tonnes. This is a great improvement, with a fall of 19.5% based off the baseline year of 1990/95.

Finally, Denmark proved itself to be the only EU member state to be energy self-sufficient in 2011. Denmark was able to produce 110% of its energy needs in 2011, compared with 121% in the previous year.

Source: Danish Energy Agency
Image Source: www.CGPGrey.com

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About the Author

I'm a Christian, a nerd, a geek, a liberal left-winger, and believe that we're pretty quickly directing planet-Earth into hell in a handbasket! I work as Associate Editor for the Important Media Network and write for CleanTechnica and Planetsave. I also write for Fantasy Book Review (.co.uk), Amazing Stories, the Stabley Times and Medium.   I love words with a passion, both creating them and reading them.



  • Russ

    Wind energy comes with towers everywhere, that is bad. If the wind stops the generators stop, that is bad too. Energy generated by gravity, in silo holes in the ground (out of sight) is better. Check out the design description for the Power Multiplier Device (given to the world): http://www.open-source-energy.org section: open source threads.
    Thank you,
    Russell Lee

  • Ole Nielsen

    Dear all. I am a huge supporter of renewable energy. I was born in Denmark but now living in Australia where this issue is debated widely. So I quoted this statistics only to be told the 30% it is only the target of energistyrelsen: http://www.ens.dk/politik/dansk-klima-energipolitik
    Can you perhaps help me understand how you got the statistics you published?
    Many thanks
    Ole

    • Bob_Wallace

      Apparently they came from the source linked at the bottom of the article.

      That page no longer exists.

      Have you checked the Danish Energy Agency site and looked at their releases from last year?

      • Bob_Wallace

        Based on the European Union method of calculation, Denmark saw renewable energy account for 23.6% of energy consumption in 2011, at the same time that electricity production based on renewable energy accounted for 40.7% of domestic electricity produced in the country.

        Have you figured out how they teased out ” 40.7% of domestic electricity produced in the country”? Might it be that the the total amount of renewable produced in 2011 divided by total use in-country = 40.7%?

        That would mean, in essence, that the extra non-renewable electricity they produced was used by other countries.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_NGU3DAAIHVPK6K3B7Z323X6IXM jack

    No question that an engineering problem can be solved at some price. What is the cost of electrcity in Denmark? Is the cost of electricity in Denmark competitive with the cost in China? Cement factories, steel mills, auto assembly plants, pharmaceutical manufacturers, textile mills, internet server farms, aircraft manufacturers, aluminum smelters, chemical companies, are looking to relocate.

    • Bob_Wallace

      Wind generated electricity is clearly cheaper than new nuclear or coal. Additionally, there is a cost for shipping from China to Europe.

      There’s a point at which it becomes cheaper to produce locally than to import. Especially seeing that China’s labor costs are increasing.

    • Anne

      There are more than 10 cents of hidden healthcare and environmental costs associated with each kWh of coal. Climate change is already costing the world economy a significant amount. Can afford that?

      The low price for fossil energy doesn’t mean it is cheap.

  • Anne

    No surprise here. Just more real-world proof for the anti-renewable energy advocates to ignore.

    To those that payed attention it has been clear for years that switching to renewable energy will
    not tank the economy, melt the grid or send us back to the stone age.

    We can have a modern life stye without fossil fuels. It is just a matter of will. End of discussion.

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