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Batteries Peugeot-Velv-1

Published on September 27th, 2011 | by Charis Michelsen

6

Peugeot Jumps on the Tiny-e-Car Bandwagon

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September 27th, 2011 by  

Tiny short-range electric cars with room for one or two were not uncommon at the IAA 2011 – VW brought the Nils, Audi had the Urban Concept, and Opel showed the Rak e. Peugeot missed the auto show, but has announced its own tiny electric car anyway – the Velv.

Velv is short for “Véhicule électrique léger de ville,” which the dictionary tells me is something like “city light electric vehicle.” Weighing only 1,433 lbs, the prototype is designed to have a range of about 60 miles and a top speed of 65 mph. So far, these numbers seem to be on paper only.

Space for three passengers is the Velv’s way of standing out. The seats are arranged in a sort of triangle, with the driver’s seat front and center. The passengers are to the rear. All three seats are accessible by gull-wing glass windows (above), and standard doors (below).

The gull-wing “doors” are powered by the 20kW electric engine (produced by Valeo), which draws its power from a lithium ion battery pack with a capacity of 8.5 kWh (produced by Johnson Controls). However, whether production of the Velv will maintain the same components as the prototype is still in question.

Rounding out the Velv’s striking and not particularly Peugeot-like appearance are the twin tires and narrow brake lights in the rear, below the small storage space nestled behind the passenger seats.

For photos, check out the gallery below.

Source | Gallery: Auto Motor Und Sport

 

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About the Author

spent 7 years living in Germany and Japan, studying both languages extensively, doing translation and education with companies like Bosch, Nissan, Fuji Heavy, and others. Charis has a Bachelor of Science degree in biology and currently lives in Chicago, Illinois. She also believes that Janeway was the best Star Trek Captain.



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  • Electric38

    Smaller batteries mean the use of solar is even more feasible. Changing a battery to charge it (via a canopy or rooftop solar installation), while using a fresh one becomes easier as they become smaller. Hopefully the price will come in at around $6,000-$7000, targeting volume sales rather than try to gouge consumers. The savings on fuel would be more than the cost of the vehicle itself.

  • http://thomerich.wordpress.com/ Tom Rich

    This little guy is pretty cool. Even if it only gets about half of the estimated miles on a charge it could still accommodate the average commuter and with a top speed of 65 mph it wouldn’t be suicidal to drive around town. The price would have to be right though as you would probably need a second car for any longer trips.

  • Anonymous

    I love the concept, but this puppy is one big cup of ugly.

    Batteries are expensive and heavy. Making lightweight EVs so that one can get there and back with fewer batteries makes a lot of sense. This one uses about half as many kW per mile as does the Nissan Leaf. (8.5kW/60 miles vs. 24kW/100miles)

    It would make for a significantly cheaper to purchase car (assuming the lightweight materials aren’t overly expensive) and would cost more like two cents rather than four cents per mile to drive (Leaf 0.35kWh/mile and $010/kWh electricity).

    (Eight cents per mile for a 50MPG Prius using $4/gallon gas.)

    These mini-EVs could be a hit for those who need an affordable moderate range ride. And this one seats more than one, unlike the Nils. But could someone step up and design something that looks more like a Cobra and less like a sneaker for seven year olds?

    • Anonymous

      Haha, I like the design. :D

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