CleanTechnica is the #1 cleantech-focused
website
 in the world. Subscribe today!


Clean Power working-metal-with-sunlight

Published on September 13th, 2011 | by Charis Michelsen

2

Solar-Powered Metalworking

Share on Google+Share on RedditShare on StumbleUponTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on FacebookPin on PinterestDigg thisShare on TumblrBuffer this pageEmail this to someone

September 13th, 2011 by
 
Solar power has as many applications as any other type of electricity, but it has been specifically adapted in a number of ways. BINE Information Services in Germany has recently released a report on yet another specific adaptation of solar power – metalworking.

Since industrial process heating is responsible for about 10% of Germany’s total electricity consumption, on the surface it seems like a natural choice for solar energy. In the town of Ennepetal, a metal processing plant has integrated 12 TVP (thermophotovoltaic) collectors – which track the sun’s position – into its existing steam network to take advantage of solar technology. The process is still in its early stages, and further testing and optimizing are planned. It is hoped that the procedures developed here will be particularly useful in more southern climates.

BINE’s report focuses on saturated steam – which is steam that is in equilibrium with heated water at the same pressure – which is used in many industrial production processes at a temperature of about 200°C. In the pilot plant in Ennepetal, absorbers in parabolic trough collectors directly produce steam. Without the parabolic trough collectors to concentrate the solar power, it is difficult if not impossible to generate steam at temperatures above 100°C. Using the collectors also makes it possible to avoid a specialized heat exchanger, which improves efficiency. The steam is then used, for example, to quickly heat various chemical baths to a variety of temperatures between 60°C and 110°C (here, for aluminum refinement). Again, the solar steam generators have been directly integrated into the existing systems.

The initial results are labeled by BINE as promising – while not much power was actually generated by the solar arrays, the integration was successful and power was produced. The groundwork has been laid for further long-term testing of what BINE calls a promising procedure for solar steam generation. Other potential uses for solar steam generation include desiccation processes, refrigeration, anything that uses conventional electricity.

BINE’s project information report – alliteratively titled “The Sunny Side of Saturated Steam” – is available for download from their website at no charge.

Source | Picture: Oekonews.at.

Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.

Print Friendly

Share on Google+Share on RedditShare on StumbleUponTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on FacebookPin on PinterestDigg thisShare on TumblrBuffer this pageEmail this to someone

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,


About the Author

spent 7 years living in Germany and Japan, studying both languages extensively, doing translation and education with companies like Bosch, Nissan, Fuji Heavy, and others. Charis has a Bachelor of Science degree in biology and currently lives in Chicago, Illinois. She also believes that Janeway was the best Star Trek Captain.



Back to Top ↑