CleanTechnica is the #1 cleantech-focused
website
 in the world. Subscribe today!


Biofuels solar-energy-water-use

Published on October 15th, 2010 | by Zachary Shahan

28

Water & Energy Facts (Blog Action Day on Water)

Share on Google+Share on RedditShare on StumbleUponTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on FacebookPin on PinterestDigg thisShare on TumblrBuffer this pageEmail this to someone
October 15th, 2010 by Zachary Shahan
 
This post is part of our participation in Blog Action Day 2010, which is on the topic of Water.

If you didn’t know, we use water to pump crude oil out of the ground, remove pollutants from power plant exhaust, flush residue after fossil fuels are burned, cool power plants, and much more. Our energy resources rely on water, much more than we probably realize. Exactly how much water?

A study from the Virginia Water Resources Research Center found a couple of years ago that:

1. “Fossil-fuel-fired thermoelectric power plants consume more than 500 billion L of fresh water per day,” or about 95 L of water for 1 kilowatt-hour of electricity.

2. Comparing water use efficiency of different fuel sources, natural gas is the most efficient fuel source and biodiesel is the least efficient (this analysis did not include solar or wind energy).

water use according to fuel source

3. When it comes to power generation technologies, hydroelectric, ironically, is the most water efficient, followed by geothermal and solar thermal. Nuclear energy is by far the least efficient, followed by fossil fuel thermoelectric (also very high).

Water Use According to Power Generation Technology

How Do Solar PV and Wind Compare?


Want some water use info on solar PV and wind energy? This is what the California Energy Commission found regarding the water use efficiency of solar PV and wind energy:

WATER CONSUMPTION–WIND AND SOLAR

Technology gallons/kWh liters/kWh

Wind [1] 0.001 0.004
PV [2] 0.030 0.110

 

Now, compare that to what the California Energy Commission found regarding water use efficiency of conventional power plants:

WATER CONSUMPTION–CONVENTIONAL POWER PLANTS

Technology gallons/kWh liters/kWh

Nuclear 0.62 2.30
Coal 0.49 1.90
Oil 0.43 1.60
Combined Cycle 0.25 0.95

 

As the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) notes, “Wind therefore uses less than 1/600 as much water per unit of electricity produced as does nuclear, and approximately 1/500 as much as coal.” Solar PV isn’t quite as water-efficient as wind energy, but it is also tremendously more efficient than other energy sources.

So, aside from the other environmental benefits of solar and wind energy, water is another big one to take note of. With water resources being used up at completely unsustainable rates, this will become an increasingly important part of the equation and will surely have a stronger and stronger effect on the costs of different energy sources.

Photo Credit: bkusler via flickr

Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.

Print Friendly

Share on Google+Share on RedditShare on StumbleUponTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on FacebookPin on PinterestDigg thisShare on TumblrBuffer this pageEmail this to someone

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,


About the Author

spends most of his time here on CleanTechnica as the director/chief editor. Otherwise, he's probably enthusiastically fulfilling his duties as the director/editor of Solar Love, EV Obsession, Planetsave, or Bikocity. Zach is recognized globally as a solar energy, electric car, and wind energy expert. If you would like him to speak at a related conference or event, connect with him via social media. You can connect with Zach on any popular social networking site you like. Links to all of his main social media profiles are on ZacharyShahan.com.



Back to Top ↑