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Clean Power Atlantis AK1000 Wave Energy Largest Tidal Turbine

Published on August 19th, 2010 | by Zachary Shahan

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World’s Largest Tidal Turbine, in Scotland

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August 19th, 2010 by Zachary Shahan
 
Atlantis AK1000 Wave Energy Largest Tidal Turbine

The world’s largest tidal turbine was unveiled last week in Invergordon, Scotland. The AK1000, as it is called, developed by Atlantis Resources Corporation, will be installed on the sea bed and connected to the grid later this summer.



The turbine can reportedly generate enough electricity to power more than 1,000 homes. It is “designed for harsh weather and rough, open ocean environments such as those off the Scottish coast.”

“The giant AK1000 turbine has an 18 metre rotor diameter, weighs 130 tonnes and stands 22.5 metres high. It is capable of dispatching 1MW of predictable power at a water velocity of 2.65m/s,” Business Green reports.

This marks a pretty big milestone in the marine energy industry. It is one big project, but it is also the culmination of years of work to get the marine energy industry on the same stage as other forms of renewable energy and ready for commercial production.

“The AK1000 is capable of unlocking the economic potential of the marine energy industry in Scotland and will greatly boost Scotland’s renewable generation capacity in the years to come,” Atlantis chief executive Timothy Cornelius says. “Today is not just about our technology, it is about the emergence of tidal power as a viable asset class that will require the development of local supply chains employing local people to deliver sustainable energy to the local grid. The AK1000 takes the industry one step closer to commercial-scale tidal power projects.”

Cornelius says that with proper support (equal to the support that fossil fuel energy gets), marine energy could be a major source of energy in the future.

“We are at the start of a new industrial boom, akin to the development of the North Sea oil and gas fields,” said Cornelius. “If we receive the same support from all levels of government that the oil and gas industry received to make the North Sea the success that it is, then the future is very bright for marine power and even brighter for Scotland.”

Photo Credit: Atlantis Resources Corporation

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About the Author

is the director of CleanTechnica, the most popular cleantech-focused website in the world, and Planetsave, a world-leading green and science news site. He has been covering green news of various sorts since 2008, and he has been especially focused on solar energy, electric vehicles, and wind energy since 2009. Aside from his work on CleanTechnica and Planetsave, he's the founder and director of Solar Love, EV Obsession, and Bikocity. To connect with Zach on some of your favorite social networks, go to ZacharyShahan.com and click on the relevant buttons.



  • EMorientes

    What happened to this? Did it work? Is it connected to the grid?

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