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Climate Change Major League Baseball embarks on sustainability campaign involving all 30 teams

Published on April 15th, 2010 | by Tina Casey

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All 30 Major League Baseball Teams Throw Curve to Climate Change Deniers



Major League Baseball embarks on sustainability campaign involving all 30 teamsAmerica’s national pastime is leading the way on climate action by adopting a comprehensive conservation and greenhouse gas-reducing program, including a public outreach component at National League and American League ballparks this summer.  The new sustainability drive involves all 30 Major League Baseball teams from coast to coast, in partnership with the Natural Resources Defense Council.

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One main feature of the program is a multi-year environmental data collection drive for Major League Baseball operations that will include energy use, waste generation and disposal (including recycling), water use, and paper goods — quite a lot of effort by a legendary American industry to get in front of a global issue that our own U.S. Chamber of Commerce refuses to address.

Major League Baseball and Sustainability

In addition to public education and data collection, major league teams have adopted an array of actions including installing solar panels (Red Sox), using staff shirts made of recycled PET bottles (Reds), purchasing Renewable Energy Credits to offset carbon emissions (Phillies), and installing a giant rainwater havesting system (Twins).

U.S. Sports and Sustainability

Major League Baseball is in good company when it comes to addressing climate change.  Sustainability has been a key issue for the U.S. ski industry for a number of years, the National Football League has paired the Superbowl and sustainability for the past four years, and even golf is looking to conserve water, cut its reliance on chemical landscape care, and promote sustainable practices among golf enthusiasts throughout the sport.

Image: Autographed baseball by aturkus on flickr.com.

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About the Author

Tina Casey specializes in military and corporate sustainability, advanced technology, emerging materials, biofuels, and water and wastewater issues. Tina’s articles are reposted frequently on Reuters, Scientific American, and many other sites. You can also follow her on Twitter @TinaMCasey and Google+.



  • http://www.pitchingmachinessupply.com/ Ryan Knox

    great to hear the twins are going green with their stadium. I just might have to convert to an M’s fan now :)

    your loyal baseball fan,
    Ryan

  • http://www.pitchingmachinesnow.com/ pitching machines

    Putting the ball in play on the ground is not always a bad thing, but turning ground balls into line drives will definitely help the hitter’s batting average and chances of playing baseball at the higher levels. Hitters with good speed can prosper by hitting the ball on the ground, especially in youth baseball, but at some point the ability to drive the ball into the outfield is necessary. Of course, hitting ground balls is better than hitting pop-ups but hitting the ball consistently on the ground is a sign of a faulty fundamental swing.

  • http://solar.calfinder.com/blog Taylen

    love the Twins and so glad they built green into the stadium…the new football stadium at the U of M is certified green as well!

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