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CO2 Emissions rawsolar

Published on August 30th, 2009 | by Susan Kraemer

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Backyard Solar Dish Melts Steel

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August 30th, 2009 by  

We’re all familiar with the vast solar thermal power stations in the desert that use mirrors to make steam to drive turbines. Giant solar thermal arrays are already making electricity in the desert in Spain and California. But what if we could have just one of these units in the backyard, just for our own use?

That’s what motivated a team of MIT students to find the way to make the cheapest solar power station out there. Mass produce it for the home user and market it under their own new start up RawSolar.

Sure, it melts steel. But even more practically for the home owner, it makes steam in a flash:

By directing the dish at the more typical target for solar thermal power stations – water – you create steam instantly. Steam that could drive your own little turbine, making your own little supply of electricity. Or you could direct it to supplying heat for a floorboard radiator setup or a radiant flooring system. Initially the team is not using the steam to make electricity, like the desert arrays. But that will be next, I’m sure.

Solar thermal power stations are far more inexpensive and efficient than solar pv, because they’re just made of mirrors held up in a metal structure. The energy of typical sunlight can be concentrated by a factor of 1,000.

The team assembled this 12-foot dish in several weeks. The design is exceedingly simple and inexpensive. The frame is composed of aluminum tubing and mirrors are attached to it. The steam is relatively low temperature steam – at about 212 to 400 degrees Fahrenheit; not the 700 degrees steam the desert arrays make.

The team comprised Spencer Ahrens, a MIT mechanical engineering graduate, Sloan MBA Micah Sze, UC Berkeley mechanical engineering grad Eva Markiewicz, Olin College student Matt Ritter and MIT materials science student Anna Bershteyn.

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About the Author

writes at CleanTechnica, CSP-Today, PV-Insider , SmartGridUpdate, and GreenProphet. She has also been published at Ecoseed, NRDC OnEarth, MatterNetwork, Celsius, EnergyNow, and Scientific American. As a former serial entrepreneur in product design, Susan brings an innovator's perspective on inventing a carbon-constrained civilization: If necessity is the mother of invention, solving climate change is the mother of all necessities! As a lover of history and sci-fi, she enjoys chronicling the strange future we are creating in these interesting times.    Follow Susan on Twitter @dotcommodity.



  • Lauren@GreenGlobalTravel

    Go MIT students for furthering the world’s knowledge of our sun’s true potential for renewable energy. Thanks for sharing.

  • Mike

    One of those old fiberglass dishes would probably work great and you could even electro plate it with chrome or some other extremely reflective material

  • Mike

    One of those old fiberglass dishes would probably work great and you could even electro plate it with chrome or some other extremely reflective material

  • http://www.harbornet.com/sunflower/pvdish.html Doug Wood

    High-intensity photovoltaic cells, like Spectrolab’s type III-V cells, make better power than do small heat engines. RawSolar is still looking for startup funding, has none.

  • http://www.harbornet.com/sunflower/pvdish.html Doug Wood

    High-intensity photovoltaic cells, like Spectrolab’s type III-V cells, make better power than do small heat engines. RawSolar is still looking for startup funding, has none.

  • MD

    I’m wondering if anyone has tried this with one of those old school satellite dishes from the 80’s, coupled with a sterling engine.

    I know that the Ford Motor Company has been doing R&D on similar projects to this for a very long time. They have the manufacturing capacity to make these abundant and economical.

  • MD

    I’m wondering if anyone has tried this with one of those old school satellite dishes from the 80’s, coupled with a sterling engine.

    I know that the Ford Motor Company has been doing R&D on similar projects to this for a very long time. They have the manufacturing capacity to make these abundant and economical.

  • Susan Kraemer

    Hope you’re keeping track; MIT team: there’s a first order!

    @Tom, but these companies only serve municipalities, utilities, islands, governments, etc — not individual home owners.

    Is it hard to add an electricity-producing turbine to this type of solar thermal at the backyard level?

  • Susan Kraemer

    Hope you’re keeping track; MIT team: there’s a first order!

    @Tom, but these companies only serve municipalities, utilities, islands, governments, etc — not individual home owners.

    Is it hard to add an electricity-producing turbine to this type of solar thermal at the backyard level?

  • Fcarrera

    I am iterested in your backyard solar dish, please contact me at fcarrera@comcast.net

  • Fcarrera

    I am iterested in your backyard solar dish, please contact me at fcarrera@comcast.net

  • Tom Lakosh

    Zenith Solar has a similar dish and they use it as a PV/T collector with type III-V solar cells that have a low temperature coeficient. I’ve suggested that they run the low temperature themal output frin multiple dishes through an Organic Rankine Cycle generator to produce another 10-20% electricity before using the heat for space, water, process or digester heat. Others such as HelioDynamics, Menova Engineering, Priono AB, Arontis Solar Solutions also have concentrating PV/T systems.

  • Tom Lakosh

    Zenith Solar has a similar dish and they use it as a PV/T collector with type III-V solar cells that have a low temperature coeficient. I’ve suggested that they run the low temperature themal output frin multiple dishes through an Organic Rankine Cycle generator to produce another 10-20% electricity before using the heat for space, water, process or digester heat. Others such as HelioDynamics, Menova Engineering, Priono AB, Arontis Solar Solutions also have concentrating PV/T systems.

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