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Biofuels charcoal

Published on February 10th, 2009 | by Ariel Schwartz

5

Scientists Develop Ultra-Efficient Biomass Charcoal Heater

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February 10th, 2009 by  

Millions of people around the world heat their homes with charcoal burned on small grills. Now a group of Japanese scientists has developed a biomass charcoal combustion heater with a thermal efficiency of 60-81 percent— a big step up from current biomass stoves, which have an efficiency of 46-53 percent.

The heater could be especially useful in Japan, where biomass is a plentiful source of renewable energy. According to scientists, large-scale use of the biomass charcoal combustion heater could potentially cut CO2 emissions by 4.46 million tons.

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About the Author

was formerly the editor of CleanTechnica and is a senior editor at Co.Exist. She has contributed to SF Weekly, Popular Science, Inhabitat, Greenbiz, NBC Bay Area, GOOD Magazine, and more. A graduate of Vassar College, she has previously worked in publishing, organic farming, documentary film, and newspaper journalism. Her interests include permaculture, hiking, skiing, music, relocalization, and cob (the building material). She currently resides in San Francisco, CA.



  • Char4heat

    If the charcoal making process is commercialized by burning the tar and pyroligneous acid produced during carbonization in a boiler. As pyrolysis is an exothermic process and only sensible heat to raise the temperature is needed for carbonization. By utilizing the heat from tar and pyroligneous acid the charcoal making process can be made energy efficient and sustainable.

  • Char4heat

    If the charcoal making process is commercialized by burning the tar and pyroligneous acid produced during carbonization in a boiler. As pyrolysis is an exothermic process and only sensible heat to raise the temperature is needed for carbonization. By utilizing the heat from tar and pyroligneous acid the charcoal making process can be made energy efficient and sustainable.

  • libra58

    This article is raising more questions than it informs.

    What is that source of abundant biomass? How is that

    biomass turned into bio charoal? The efficiecy rating is

    about the same or less as with using wood pellets.

    Are they actually using biomass charcoal or pellets

    and if so would the same furnace be able to use pellets? Is this new heater idea actually commercially

    viable? Was this article written by amateur dabbler?

    Real facts please.

  • http://GlobalPatriot.com Global Patriot

    While most of us focus on the efficiencies of central heating for our homes, there are millions around the world using a more basic method for heat.

    Significantly improving the thermal efficiency of charcoal heaters and stoves will have a significant effect on lowering CO2 emissions and reducing pollution.

  • http://GlobalPatriot.com Global Patriot

    While most of us focus on the efficiencies of central heating for our homes, there are millions around the world using a more basic method for heat.

    Significantly improving the thermal efficiency of charcoal heaters and stoves will have a significant effect on lowering CO2 emissions and reducing pollution.

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