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Consumer Technology ecofont

Published on December 11th, 2008 | by Ariel Schwartz

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Ecofont Uses Up to 20% Less Ink

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December 11th, 2008 by
 
ecofont

A Dutch company called SPRANQ has developed a simple yet brilliant way to save ink: the Ecofont. According to the its creators, the font saves up to 20 percent of the ink normally used in printing.

The key to Ecofont is its style of white dots filled inside each letter which minimize ink usage. Ecofont looks best with font size 9 or 10, and is only available in a sans serif version.

You can download it here.

Photo Credit: Ecofont

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About the Author

was formerly the editor of CleanTechnica and is a senior editor at Co.Exist. She has contributed to SF Weekly, Popular Science, Inhabitat, Greenbiz, NBC Bay Area, GOOD Magazine, and more. A graduate of Vassar College, she has previously worked in publishing, organic farming, documentary film, and newspaper journalism. Her interests include permaculture, hiking, skiing, music, relocalization, and cob (the building material). She currently resides in San Francisco, CA.



  • justin

    ok, it saves black ink maybe, but look at how much more white ink is needed

  • justin

    ok, it saves black ink maybe, but look at how much more white ink is needed

  • Jason

    This is horrible typography. If you want to reduce ink use by 20%, try printing in 80% black, using a typeface with a small x-height, or using a typeface with a light or ultra-light varitation.

  • Jason

    This is horrible typography. If you want to reduce ink use by 20%, try printing in 80% black, using a typeface with a small x-height, or using a typeface with a light or ultra-light varitation.

  • http://www.business-strategies-etc.com Gail Nickel-Kailing

    I downloaded the font and compared it with Arial 11pt – which is what I generally use.

    The kerning and leading of the font, as well as the size – the Eco-Font 11pt appears much larger when printed than the Arial 11pt – resulted in a document that was probably 20% larger.

    Doesn’t really make sense to save 20% on the ink or toner when you could be using more sheets of paper.

    G.

  • http://www.business-strategies-etc.com Gail Nickel-Kailing

    I downloaded the font and compared it with Arial 11pt – which is what I generally use.

    The kerning and leading of the font, as well as the size – the Eco-Font 11pt appears much larger when printed than the Arial 11pt – resulted in a document that was probably 20% larger.

    Doesn’t really make sense to save 20% on the ink or toner when you could be using more sheets of paper.

    G.

  • Justin W

    lol kinda cool! Thanks for sharing

  • Justin W

    lol kinda cool! Thanks for sharing

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