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Clean Power solar thermal

Published on November 11th, 2008 | by Ariel Schwartz

5

Utilities Testing Solar Thermal Tech at Traditional Power Plants

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November 11th, 2008 by
 
solar thermal

The Electric Power Research Institute announced yesterday that two utility companies (Dynasty Inc and NV Energy) will test out the addition of solar thermal energy to natural gas plants in Arizona and Nevada. The EPRI is conducting the project to determine if using solar thermal at fossil fuel plants will reduce fuel costs and plant emissions.

The natural gas plants will add steam created by solar thermal fields to the conventional natural gas-powered steam cycle. Ultimately, EPRI plans to add solar thermal technology to coal-powered plants as well.

In addition to reducing costs and greenhouse gas emissions, EPRI believes that solar thermal technology could also boost coal and natural gas power enough in existing plants to eliminate the need for new infrastructure. And since fossil fuel plants aren’t going anywhere, giving them renewable energy capabilities makes a great deal of sense.

Photo Credit: National Renewable Energy Laboratory

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About the Author

was formerly the editor of CleanTechnica and is a senior editor at Co.Exist. She has contributed to SF Weekly, Popular Science, Inhabitat, Greenbiz, NBC Bay Area, GOOD Magazine, and more. A graduate of Vassar College, she has previously worked in publishing, organic farming, documentary film, and newspaper journalism. Her interests include permaculture, hiking, skiing, music, relocalization, and cob (the building material). She currently resides in San Francisco, CA.



  • Wu.zhonghua

    Solar Energy Projects to Seek Cooperation From China

    Dear Sir / Madam:
    I come from Xi’an, China, is a mechanical engineer, aged 60 years old already, I spent nearly 15 years developed a new type of solar thermal power generation and urban residential winter heating system. The present invention completely solves the world’s solar energy can not solve the technical problems of long-term storage. Long-term storage of heat from solar energy. China has won a number of national patents. Are due to financial problems can not be resolved, the project developed a temporary halt.
    Now for the global search for new energy venture capitalists interested in the project pre-development funding requirements of about $ 1.5 million U.S Dollars..
    The funds raised for the project complete the initial trial prototype equipment, technical testing, identification and post-project technology transfer and product promotion.
    Investors can receive funds throughout regulation and the use of flexible cooperation.
    Can also be invited to go abroad to develop projects or provide Patent technology transfer.
    Welcome domestic and foreign investors interested to inspect the project in Xi’an, China, the project meet the requirements of investors to discuss further details of cooperation.
    I have the authenticity and reliability of the project to bear legal responsibility.
    If you are interested please contact us:
    E-Mail: wuzhonghua2011@hotmail.com
    Office Address:
    Contact person: Wu.zhonghua Engineer
    No:7#-1-406 Building
    Wei-Qing-North Road Xu-Jia-Wan
    Xi’an city Shaanxi Province china

    People’s Republic of china
    Postcord:710021

    Best Regards:
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    Wu.zhonghua Engineer
    Ocoter, 08.2011

  • http://www.abc.net.au/7.30/content/2007/s1837616.htm xoddam

    The large coal-fired power station at Liddell in the Hunter River valley in New South Wales, Australia has been using supplemental heat from a solar array for about two years now. This mid-scale demonstration project (currently contributing 38MWth on sunny days towards the power station’s 2000MWe capacity) has been an all-round success and is being expanded. Eventually the solar component of the power plant’s output may approach 25%.

    http://www.abc.net.au/7.30/content/2007/s1837616.htm

    http://www.abc.net.au/local/stories/2008/10/16/2393169.htm?site=upperhunter

    This was the demonstration plant that proved the linear fresnel concentrating mirror technology now being commercialised in the USA by the firm Ausra. Ausra’s Canadian-born founder, David Mills, developed the technique whilst an academic at the University of Sydney.

  • http://www.abc.net.au/7.30/content/2007/s1837616.htm xoddam

    The large coal-fired power station at Liddell in the Hunter River valley in New South Wales, Australia has been using supplemental heat from a solar array for about two years now. This mid-scale demonstration project (currently contributing 38MWth on sunny days towards the power station’s 2000MWe capacity) has been an all-round success and is being expanded. Eventually the solar component of the power plant’s output may approach 25%.

    http://www.abc.net.au/7.30/content/2007/s1837616.htm

    http://www.abc.net.au/local/stories/2008/10/16/2393169.htm?site=upperhunter

    This was the demonstration plant that proved the linear fresnel concentrating mirror technology now being commercialised in the USA by the firm Ausra. Ausra’s Canadian-born founder, David Mills, developed the technique whilst an academic at the University of Sydney.

  • pat parent

    Great idea!

    Now, you need only connect the cold water intake to the solar arrays, then send the resulting warm water to the furnaces to bring it to a boil. That way the solar arrays will not radiate away their heat energy.

    Very elegant.

  • pat parent

    Great idea!

    Now, you need only connect the cold water intake to the solar arrays, then send the resulting warm water to the furnaces to bring it to a boil. That way the solar arrays will not radiate away their heat energy.

    Very elegant.

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