CleanTechnica is the #1 cleantech-focused
website
 in the world. Subscribe today!


CO2 Emissions carbon capturing rock

Published on November 5th, 2008 | by Ariel Schwartz

15

Scientists: Rocks Could Be Used to Capture CO2

Share on Google+Share on RedditShare on StumbleUponTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on FacebookPin on PinterestDigg thisShare on TumblrBuffer this pageEmail this to someone

November 5th, 2008 by
 
carbon capturing rock

According to researchers at Columbia University, peridotite rocks could be harnessed to capture carbon dioxide in large quantities, potentially offsetting billions of tons of CO2 emissions each year. The rocks, found in Oman, California, New Guinea and elsewhere, produce calcium carbonate and magnesium carbonate rock (both solids) upon contact with CO2.

Previous attempts to transport the rock to power plants and combine it with smokestack gases have been seen as too expensive. But the Columbia researchers have discovered a high rate of reaction underground—in the Omani desert, peridotite is naturally absorbing 10,000 to 100,000 tons of CO2 each year.

As a result, CO2 could be sent to the rocks at a much lower cost. Columbia’s scientists believe that they could speed up the carbon-locking process by 100,000 times by boring into the ground and injecting heated water containing CO2. And since the CO2 would be stored in the form of rock, there would be no chance of it leaking out.

The researchers have completed successful tests of their theory in Oman, and now want to test on a larger scale. Whether they will reap such successful results elsewhere remains to be seen.

Whatever the case, this is a promising development—carbon sequestration techniques currently run the risk of earthquakes or other natural events releasing massive amounts of buried CO2 into the atmosphere. Eliminating that risk makes the practice seem much more viable in the long term.

Photo Credit: Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory

Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.

Print Friendly

Share on Google+Share on RedditShare on StumbleUponTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on FacebookPin on PinterestDigg thisShare on TumblrBuffer this pageEmail this to someone

Tags: , , , , ,


About the Author

was formerly the editor of CleanTechnica and is a senior editor at Co.Exist. She has contributed to SF Weekly, Popular Science, Inhabitat, Greenbiz, NBC Bay Area, GOOD Magazine, and more. A graduate of Vassar College, she has previously worked in publishing, organic farming, documentary film, and newspaper journalism. Her interests include permaculture, hiking, skiing, music, relocalization, and cob (the building material). She currently resides in San Francisco, CA.



  • Uncle B

    It has already been well established that in making Bio-Diesel from Algae, CO2 is required component to stimulate the process to the point of practical efficiency! SEE: {http://www.itsgood4.us/biodiesel.htm

    Algae can produce oil. Estimates using today’s production techniques are 400 gallons per acre. The University of New Hampshire is exploring ways of forced production of algae for biodiesel that is yielding 10,000 gallons per acre and uses salty water. Their calculations show that a tiny area of the Sonoran desert in New Mexico (about 9%) is enough area to produce all of the transportation fuel in the U.S. using their production techniques. Already, one company is experimenting with algae production stations at a power plant to capture the CO2 from the exhaust and use it to make algae for biodiesel.} Mining anything is a very expensive deal! peridotite is a very hard rock, will required crushing, is heavy and needs transporting, is labor intensive and dangerous and needs at least open-pit mining! Great idea, but not practical, or the best solution available! Why not build Algae based CO2 absorbing bio diesel plants attached to coal burning power plants, and kill two birds with one stone, have a win-win, reduce foreign oil consumption at the same time as burning coal cleanly, produce power and oil all at once, and make cinder blocks from the ash while your at it, make a mega-employer, an industrial complex to build a town around – a new , clean safe America! DO IT! don’t red tape it to death, America, move on it! Do something before you die from the (GRD) great republican depression, which is now eating you alive!

  • Uncle B

    It has already been well established that in making Bio-Diesel from Algae, CO2 is required component to stimulate the process to the point of practical efficiency! SEE: {http://www.itsgood4.us/biodiesel.htm

    Algae can produce oil. Estimates using today’s production techniques are 400 gallons per acre. The University of New Hampshire is exploring ways of forced production of algae for biodiesel that is yielding 10,000 gallons per acre and uses salty water. Their calculations show that a tiny area of the Sonoran desert in New Mexico (about 9%) is enough area to produce all of the transportation fuel in the U.S. using their production techniques. Already, one company is experimenting with algae production stations at a power plant to capture the CO2 from the exhaust and use it to make algae for biodiesel.} Mining anything is a very expensive deal! peridotite is a very hard rock, will required crushing, is heavy and needs transporting, is labor intensive and dangerous and needs at least open-pit mining! Great idea, but not practical, or the best solution available! Why not build Algae based CO2 absorbing bio diesel plants attached to coal burning power plants, and kill two birds with one stone, have a win-win, reduce foreign oil consumption at the same time as burning coal cleanly, produce power and oil all at once, and make cinder blocks from the ash while your at it, make a mega-employer, an industrial complex to build a town around – a new , clean safe America! DO IT! don’t red tape it to death, America, move on it! Do something before you die from the (GRD) great republican depression, which is now eating you alive!

  • Uncle B

    It has already been well established that in making Bio-Diesel from Algae, CO2 is required component to stimulate the process to the point of practical efficiency! SEE: {http://www.itsgood4.us/biodiesel.htm

    Algae can produce oil. Estimates using today’s production techniques are 400 gallons per acre. The University of New Hampshire is exploring ways of forced production of algae for biodiesel that is yielding 10,000 gallons per acre and uses salty water. Their calculations show that a tiny area of the Sonoran desert in New Mexico (about 9%) is enough area to produce all of the transportation fuel in the U.S. using their production techniques. Already, one company is experimenting with algae production stations at a power plant to capture the CO2 from the exhaust and use it to make algae for biodiesel.} Mining anything is a very expensive deal! peridotite is a very hard rock, will required crushing, is heavy and needs transporting, is labor intensive and dangerous and needs at least open-pit mining! Great idea, but not practical, or the best solution available! Why not build Algae based CO2 absorbing bio diesel plants attached to coal burning power plants, and kill two birds with one stone, have a win-win, reduce foreign oil consumption at the same time as burning coal cleanly, produce power and oil all at once, and make cinder blocks from the ash while your at it, make a mega-employer, an industrial complex to build a town around – a new , clean safe America! DO IT! don’t red tape it to death, America, move on it! Do something before you die from the (GRD) great republican depression, which is now eating you alive!

  • http://url.ie/h1b?552544090 design

    Paper, CO2, Scissors?

  • http://url.ie/h1b?552544090 design

    Paper, CO2, Scissors?

  • http://url.ie/h1b?552544090 design

    Paper, CO2, Scissors?

  • http://uk-tv-guide.com TV Guide

    Interesting…dig up carbon, burn it, release carbon dioxide and try to bury it again.

  • http://uk-tv-guide.com TV Guide

    Interesting…dig up carbon, burn it, release carbon dioxide and try to bury it again.

  • Just wondering

    If the rocks absorb CO2 the will the atmosphere shink and the rocks grow.

    And don’t we need CO2 for oxygen.

    I understand that we have a LOT of CO2. But sun is hotter than “normal”. So do we really have a CO2 problem, needs us to bury CO2. Wouldn’t that cause a problem in the future?

    Just Wondering…

  • Just wondering

    If the rocks absorb CO2 the will the atmosphere shink and the rocks grow.

    And don’t we need CO2 for oxygen.

    I understand that we have a LOT of CO2. But sun is hotter than “normal”. So do we really have a CO2 problem, needs us to bury CO2. Wouldn’t that cause a problem in the future?

    Just Wondering…

  • Just wondering

    If the rocks absorb CO2 the will the atmosphere shink and the rocks grow.

    And don’t we need CO2 for oxygen.

    I understand that we have a LOT of CO2. But sun is hotter than “normal”. So do we really have a CO2 problem, needs us to bury CO2. Wouldn’t that cause a problem in the future?

    Just Wondering…

  • http://www.acaiberrydrink.org/ J. Acai

    Imagine being able to successfully turn any waste byproduct into carbon again. We would truly have mastered the elements.

  • http://www.acaiberrydrink.org/ J. Acai

    Imagine being able to successfully turn any waste byproduct into carbon again. We would truly have mastered the elements.

  • http://www.ntopics.com ntopics

    What a great idea to reduce CO2 emissions.

    I wonder how often sites like these can

    be found.

    thanks from tony

  • http://www.ntopics.com ntopics

    What a great idea to reduce CO2 emissions.

    I wonder how often sites like these can

    be found.

    thanks from tony

Back to Top ↑