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Clean Transport high-speed train

Published on August 12th, 2008 | by Ariel Schwartz

20

Sweden Rolling Out 183 MPH High-Speed Green Train

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August 12th, 2008 by
 
high-speed train

Maybe you’ve heard about the proposed high-speed train in California. Well, Sweden is beating the West Coast to the punch with their Green Train.

The Green Train, or Gröna Tåget, will cut energy use on rail lines by 30 percent through lowered operational costs and journey times. Top speeds reached 183 MPH on a test run.

Best of all, the Green Train can operate on the current rail infrastructure. That means there’s no need to lay down new tracks.

Energy saving measures on the train include a permanent magnet motor to increase propulsion chain efficiency and a system that saves up to 15 percent of traction energy by assisting drivers with speed and traction force information.

While the Green Train is significantly slower than California’s proposed high-speed rail (and the same speed as the French high-speed train), it has set a Swedish speed record. Additionally, it is already in the testing stages, while the California rail won’t be ready for at least 20 years. Research on the Green Train will conclude in 2010 or 2011, so it shouldn’t be too long before the system is operational.

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About the Author

was formerly the editor of CleanTechnica and is a senior editor at Co.Exist. She has contributed to SF Weekly, Popular Science, Inhabitat, Greenbiz, NBC Bay Area, GOOD Magazine, and more. A graduate of Vassar College, she has previously worked in publishing, organic farming, documentary film, and newspaper journalism. Her interests include permaculture, hiking, skiing, music, relocalization, and cob (the building material). She currently resides in San Francisco, CA.



  • jean cartier

    Thank You

  • jack the wack

    To be used in the USA, the existing infrastructure would have to be abandoned. Too many collapseable bridges in use.

  • jack the wack

    To be used in the USA, the existing infrastructure would have to be abandoned. Too many collapseable bridges in use.

  • Keith Langton

    How is the Swedish train propelled? Is it maglev, hybrid or fuel cell. How can it travel at 183 mph on ols style tracks?

  • Keith Langton

    How is the Swedish train propelled? Is it maglev, hybrid or fuel cell. How can it travel at 183 mph on ols style tracks?

  • James

    With respect ot what david has said. We wouldn’t have to build new rail beds or infra-structures. We could utilize the Interstate Highway System. As fuel for cars and trucks wain, the highways will be vastly under utilized. We could shut down one side of the two lane roads and use it for rail beds. The other side could be made into two lane roads to handle two-way traffic. As the trains near big cities or small towns, they could make stops to deliver the passengers, mail, and goods.

  • James

    With respect ot what david has said. We wouldn’t have to build new rail beds or infra-structures. We could utilize the Interstate Highway System. As fuel for cars and trucks wain, the highways will be vastly under utilized. We could shut down one side of the two lane roads and use it for rail beds. The other side could be made into two lane roads to handle two-way traffic. As the trains near big cities or small towns, they could make stops to deliver the passengers, mail, and goods.

  • http://www.carbonoffsetsdaily.com/ Christopher Keys

    David I agree.

    Plus maybe funding can come from the carbon market to get this show on the road.

  • http://www.carbonoffsetsdaily.com/ Christopher Keys

    David I agree.

    Plus maybe funding can come from the carbon market to get this show on the road.

  • Pom

    Oooh, you’ve gone and changed the units on us. It’s 295km/h.

  • Pom

    Oooh, you’ve gone and changed the units on us. It’s 295km/h.

  • http://www.foxtrotphotographics.com David

    Europe has been the leader in railroad technology since the airlines and automobile made passenger rail obsolete here in America. The fact that they are testing something that already exists in another country means that rollout of a fully-functional system in Sweden will be much quicker, with limited operations easily within the scope of 2 years and full operations within 5. Trying to do the same thing in the US would take a minimum of 15 years simply because the infrastructure would have to be either built from scratch or upgraded from existing facilities. In all honesty, the best way to bring passenger rail to the States today would be to build an all-new infrastructure, literally buying needed routes from the Class-1 freighters or laying out new.

    Fast and efficient passenger rail is needed in the US. Airlines are getting too expensive for the shorter runs and the cars that have the comfort for longer don’t have the gas mileage they need. Passenger rail can work to help focus transportation around the country, serving as the spokes to the airlines’ hub-and-spoke system which would reduce airline costs by eliminating short hops and provide relatively cheap and very efficient short-to-medium-range transportation to everybody.

    It works in the rest of the world. It can work here too.

  • http://www.foxtrotphotographics.com David

    Europe has been the leader in railroad technology since the airlines and automobile made passenger rail obsolete here in America. The fact that they are testing something that already exists in another country means that rollout of a fully-functional system in Sweden will be much quicker, with limited operations easily within the scope of 2 years and full operations within 5. Trying to do the same thing in the US would take a minimum of 15 years simply because the infrastructure would have to be either built from scratch or upgraded from existing facilities. In all honesty, the best way to bring passenger rail to the States today would be to build an all-new infrastructure, literally buying needed routes from the Class-1 freighters or laying out new.

    Fast and efficient passenger rail is needed in the US. Airlines are getting too expensive for the shorter runs and the cars that have the comfort for longer don’t have the gas mileage they need. Passenger rail can work to help focus transportation around the country, serving as the spokes to the airlines’ hub-and-spoke system which would reduce airline costs by eliminating short hops and provide relatively cheap and very efficient short-to-medium-range transportation to everybody.

    It works in the rest of the world. It can work here too.

  • Jim McDIsh

    Nice! Fast trains totally rock!

    JT

    http://www.FireMe.To/udi

  • Jim McDIsh

    Nice! Fast trains totally rock!

    JT

    http://www.FireMe.To/udi

  • ed

    The article is a bit misleading, as it depicts the train as green and somehow fast.

    It might be green but it is not exactly a bullet train.

    The french TGV’s recent record is 357.2 mph (april 2007), the link you refer to about the TGV is 15 year old.

  • ed

    The article is a bit misleading, as it depicts the train as green and somehow fast.

    It might be green but it is not exactly a bullet train.

    The french TGV’s recent record is 357.2 mph (april 2007), the link you refer to about the TGV is 15 year old.

  • Pingback: Need a more efficient train, how about one that never stops? - The Environment Site Forums

  • http://www.lifefeed.se P-M Nordkvist

    This article makes it sound like sweden is rolling out large scale high speed green trains wich is not true at all. Gröna Tåget is a small scale research project. The swedish opposition demands high speed lanes between the three largest cities in sweden. Malmö – Göteborg – Stockholm. But this is at least 5-10 years in the future.

    Very interesting though.

  • http://www.lifefeed.se P-M Nordkvist

    This article makes it sound like sweden is rolling out large scale high speed green trains wich is not true at all. Gröna Tåget is a small scale research project. The swedish opposition demands high speed lanes between the three largest cities in sweden. Malmö – Göteborg – Stockholm. But this is at least 5-10 years in the future.

    Very interesting though.

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