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Clean Power Wind Farm

Published on July 29th, 2008 | by Ariel Schwartz

73

World's Largest Wind Farm Planned In Oregon

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July 29th, 2008 by  

Wind Farm

The Portland Business Journal reports that Oregon has just been given the go-ahead by The Oregon Energy Facility Siting Council to build a 909 MW wind farm in the north-central part of the state. That’s enough energy to power 200,000 homes.

The Shepherd’s Flat Wind Farm will contain 303 wind turbines and will double the state’s wind-generating capacity. It will boost the local economy by creating 250 to 300 new jobs, and lease payments to landowners will supplement farm incomes.

However, the farm does face one challenge: Northwest power agencies claim to only be able to handle 1500 more megawatts of wind power on the grid. With new renewable energy projects popping up all over the place, it might be time to start thinking about some serious solutions to this problem.

If all goes according to plan, the Oregonian wind farm—scheduled to be in operation by 2010— will ultimately be overtaken in capacity by T. Boone Pickens’ 4000 MW Texas wind farm, which should be completed by 2014.

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About the Author

was formerly the editor of CleanTechnica and is a senior editor at Co.Exist. She has contributed to SF Weekly, Popular Science, Inhabitat, Greenbiz, NBC Bay Area, GOOD Magazine, and more. A graduate of Vassar College, she has previously worked in publishing, organic farming, documentary film, and newspaper journalism. Her interests include permaculture, hiking, skiing, music, relocalization, and cob (the building material). She currently resides in San Francisco, CA.



  • Melissa

    Does the The Shepherd’s Flat Wind Farm give Scholarships to high school graduates?

  • Pingback: Europe’s Largest Wind Farm Gets Approval in Sweden : CleanTechnica

  • alank

    Not to worry about over capacity. Since water use is drying up the lakes, many hydroelectric power stations will go offline. Wind blows 24 hrs a day, these turbines needs no storage, no pollution, and are magnificent to watch.

    Those against wind farms will always be around to offer scary stories and totally fabricated problems. I recall one argument that had birds falling out of the sky as they run into the blades. Unsubstantiated and certainly not based on facts.

    We need to guard against frivolous lawsuits and move quickly to stay ahead of the curve for clean sources of electricity.

  • alank

    Not to worry about over capacity. Since water use is drying up the lakes, many hydroelectric power stations will go offline. Wind blows 24 hrs a day, these turbines needs no storage, no pollution, and are magnificent to watch.

    Those against wind farms will always be around to offer scary stories and totally fabricated problems. I recall one argument that had birds falling out of the sky as they run into the blades. Unsubstantiated and certainly not based on facts.

    We need to guard against frivolous lawsuits and move quickly to stay ahead of the curve for clean sources of electricity.

  • alank

    Not to worry about over capacity. Since water use is drying up the lakes, many hydroelectric power stations will go offline. Wind blows 24 hrs a day, these turbines needs no storage, no pollution, and are magnificent to watch.

    Those against wind farms will always be around to offer scary stories and totally fabricated problems. I recall one argument that had birds falling out of the sky as they run into the blades. Unsubstantiated and certainly not based on facts.

    We need to guard against frivolous lawsuits and move quickly to stay ahead of the curve for clean sources of electricity.

  • http://coastalyurts@gmail.com dan shultz

    I love the whole Idea about being able to look out side of the box. There is at least one right way to solve every problem. lets find the answer.

    Dan Shultz

  • http://coastalyurts@gmail.com dan shultz

    I would like to say that there is no reason that we cant farm solar energy in eastern oregon in between brotheres and burns a hundred miles north and a hundred miles south. That is a 3 hour drive of nearly flat desert that has nothing but sage and the invasive juniper tree. We would have a little snow fall during the winter but the last trip I made out there was in boardmen with is north and it was in february and it was over a 100 degrees all day every day. there is always sun beating down on the baren desert maybe even over 300 days a year. I have traveled the desert in the whole area and the great thing is there is a giant set of power lines that go from the columbia gorge and north, strait down to california. I could set up a government grant to lease a 10,000 acre property for the next 100 years and set up a system for the public to be able to invest in their future, by buying their own panels at a workable price. and as the system builds cash flow then we would buy more and more panels. There is no reason that we cant make our usage from solar to nearly 75%or more. If I built a solar farm in eastern oregon I could produce more than enough energy to power every home in the usa. I am not even talking about when all our cars will be electric. we will probably be fueling our autos in our garage with a charger system in the future. How much energy will we be using then? It can all come from natural energy. We should give up burning fuel. We should save it for all the plastic thing we will need for the next 1000 years. it takes millions of dollars in energy to grow our giant trees if we had to use all the electricity to grow them for 45 years, that energy is freeeeeeeeeee for trees. We can harvest energy so easy from many natural systems, Like falling water, and the never ending wind, and the waves, rivers flowing that could turn generators. I think that it is silly how there is always naysayers about the good solutions and no one cares to change the whole energy system. when the whole answer is found by looking up.

    Eventually all of our cars will be powered by either a battery charger that we change and swap out for a fresh charged one or we will have battery charge stations located like our current fuel stops.

    We always think stupid crap like “the wind turbines kill seagulls” that is f*#%ed! who gives a crap about the seagulls they will never die off. we are killing our entire ecosystem off by the BURNING of fuels. I worked in the biofuel industry and it is not the answer.

    I can not see any reason why we cant be harvesting the greatest energy source in the universe… The SUN!!!!!!

    it is selfish that we have not already taken the step to change our bad habbits. I drive a one ton crew cab duramax diesel chevy truck that I use for my business, and I spend thousands of dollars each quarter on just getting to the jobs!! it sucks. why cant we be solving this damn problem already!!!!!!!!!!

    Ok I know i am ranting. and I know that humans are animals of nessesity but come on its about past nessesary. If no one else starts farming the sun here in the great state of Oregon then I will! just look for it. We need to take it into our own hands and stop blogging about it and take care of our grandkids or we will just be stuck.

    Oregon has always been the experimental state. When there is a new idea, some crazy oregonian goes out in the desert and welds some shit up and solves big problems. It will happen.

    Dan Shultz

    541 350 3996

    oregondanman@gmail.com

    if you want in then get a hold of me!

  • Pingback: Oregon Launching First Solar Highway in the US : CleanTechnica

  • brc

    Wind is intermittent,John, so we will never be able to be 100% wind.

    And wind is NOT 100% “green”. Everything comes with a price; bats and birds are at risk in our new wind economy, as are forests, which many power speculators have an eye to cut down on the windiest ridges. And all these wind farms in rural areas support sprawl to get workers near them, they encourage road building to remote locations, and they require massive amounts of production inputs.

    We are still trying to engineer our way out of the core problem: too many people using too many resources.

  • brc

    Wind is intermittent,John, so we will never be able to be 100% wind.

    And wind is NOT 100% “green”. Everything comes with a price; bats and birds are at risk in our new wind economy, as are forests, which many power speculators have an eye to cut down on the windiest ridges. And all these wind farms in rural areas support sprawl to get workers near them, they encourage road building to remote locations, and they require massive amounts of production inputs.

    We are still trying to engineer our way out of the core problem: too many people using too many resources.

  • brc

    Wind is intermittent,John, so we will never be able to be 100% wind.

    And wind is NOT 100% “green”. Everything comes with a price; bats and birds are at risk in our new wind economy, as are forests, which many power speculators have an eye to cut down on the windiest ridges. And all these wind farms in rural areas support sprawl to get workers near them, they encourage road building to remote locations, and they require massive amounts of production inputs.

    We are still trying to engineer our way out of the core problem: too many people using too many resources.

  • http://askabouttech.com/ Tyler

    I hope more and more cities do this, 200,000 homes is such a significate number. Dugg.

  • http://askabouttech.com/ Tyler

    I hope more and more cities do this, 200,000 homes is such a significate number. Dugg.

  • http://askabouttech.com/ Tyler

    I hope more and more cities do this, 200,000 homes is such a significate number. Dugg.

  • Pingback: 2,000 MW Wind Farm Will Send Power from Wyoming to Southern California : CleanTechnica

  • Jim

    Wind farms , Nuclear, Solar take too long to implement and require huge amounts of capital. For a 20 year lifecycle after all that investment.

    Ethanol can do all this now! In World War 2 when we were embargoed we changed over to ethanol in 6 mos.

    500b spent on Iraq would have made made us energy independent.

    5% of unusable farmland would do it

    Learn here

    http://peswiki.com/index.php/Review:Alcohol_can_be_a_Gas

  • Jim

    Wind farms , Nuclear, Solar take too long to implement and require huge amounts of capital. For a 20 year lifecycle after all that investment.

    Ethanol can do all this now! In World War 2 when we were embargoed we changed over to ethanol in 6 mos.

    500b spent on Iraq would have made made us energy independent.

    5% of unusable farmland would do it

    Learn here

    http://peswiki.com/index.php/Review:Alcohol_can_be_a_Gas

  • Jim

    Wind farms , Nuclear, Solar take too long to implement and require huge amounts of capital. For a 20 year lifecycle after all that investment.

    Ethanol can do all this now! In World War 2 when we were embargoed we changed over to ethanol in 6 mos.

    500b spent on Iraq would have made made us energy independent.

    5% of unusable farmland would do it

    Learn here

    http://peswiki.com/index.php/Review:Alcohol_can_be_a_Gas

  • Steve Monahan

    John (Vertography) wrote:

    “Not sure why they would single out wind power, after all, once generated it is the same as any other power on the grid. So, if that means their grid can only handle another 1500MW of power…”

    I think it has to do with the intermittent nature of wind. The grid can only use so much from an inconsistent source such as wind. An online lecture found at Stanford on iTunes includes a good explanation of this problem while offering the solution of combining numerous wind farms to increase reliability. It’s a very recent addition to the “Woods Energy Seminar.” It’s called “The Importance of Wind Power in a Clean and Renewable Future.”

  • Steve Monahan

    John (Vertography) wrote:

    “Not sure why they would single out wind power, after all, once generated it is the same as any other power on the grid. So, if that means their grid can only handle another 1500MW of power…”

    I think it has to do with the intermittent nature of wind. The grid can only use so much from an inconsistent source such as wind. An online lecture found at Stanford on iTunes includes a good explanation of this problem while offering the solution of combining numerous wind farms to increase reliability. It’s a very recent addition to the “Woods Energy Seminar.” It’s called “The Importance of Wind Power in a Clean and Renewable Future.”

  • Steve Monahan

    John (Vertography) wrote:

    “Not sure why they would single out wind power, after all, once generated it is the same as any other power on the grid. So, if that means their grid can only handle another 1500MW of power…”

    I think it has to do with the intermittent nature of wind. The grid can only use so much from an inconsistent source such as wind. An online lecture found at Stanford on iTunes includes a good explanation of this problem while offering the solution of combining numerous wind farms to increase reliability. It’s a very recent addition to the “Woods Energy Seminar.” It’s called “The Importance of Wind Power in a Clean and Renewable Future.”

  • Pingback: World’s Largest Wind Farm Planned In Oregon « Hermosaman’s Weblog

  • http://redgreenandblue.org Rod Adams

    androo:

    I spent the first 17 years of my life very close to the Florida shore line. I often gazed out over a flat calm ocean and even spent some days water skiing on that ocean.

    Even on the shore, the wind can often be gone for many hours at a time. In addition, those large structures – and their underwater supporting structures will either be put into deep water or interfere with an already stressed coral reef system.

    Wind is not a panacea and not always the best environmental choice. That is especially true in areas like the entire southeast section of the US – including Florida – where wind maps show that the potential for power production is low.

  • http://redgreenandblue.org Rod Adams

    androo:

    I spent the first 17 years of my life very close to the Florida shore line. I often gazed out over a flat calm ocean and even spent some days water skiing on that ocean.

    Even on the shore, the wind can often be gone for many hours at a time. In addition, those large structures – and their underwater supporting structures will either be put into deep water or interfere with an already stressed coral reef system.

    Wind is not a panacea and not always the best environmental choice. That is especially true in areas like the entire southeast section of the US – including Florida – where wind maps show that the potential for power production is low.

  • Tex928

    No doubt, this is good. Solar needs attention too, and geothermal, and … All forms should be used in geographic areas where they make sense. At the same time people should not be naive by thinking we can escape fossil fuels quickly. The big problem is that the U.S. needs a broad based, well founded*** national energy policy that will address today’s problems with today’s wherewithal (like more oil production, clean-coal technology, etc., that some don’t like), while working toward a more secure (economically, enviornmentally, …) future. The plan needs to be devloped by engineers (like me), not politicians. I think it is almost hopeless though; there are too many special interests, too much ignorance about energy technologies, too much bureaucracy, …

    *** example of this is the push toward ethanol fuel. It was not well founded in that it did not recognize the effect on food prices. Now, the ethanol idea is not all bad, it just needs to be folded into the broad based, well founded energy policy I cited here.

  • Tex928

    No doubt, this is good. Solar needs attention too, and geothermal, and … All forms should be used in geographic areas where they make sense. At the same time people should not be naive by thinking we can escape fossil fuels quickly. The big problem is that the U.S. needs a broad based, well founded*** national energy policy that will address today’s problems with today’s wherewithal (like more oil production, clean-coal technology, etc., that some don’t like), while working toward a more secure (economically, enviornmentally, …) future. The plan needs to be devloped by engineers (like me), not politicians. I think it is almost hopeless though; there are too many special interests, too much ignorance about energy technologies, too much bureaucracy, …

    *** example of this is the push toward ethanol fuel. It was not well founded in that it did not recognize the effect on food prices. Now, the ethanol idea is not all bad, it just needs to be folded into the broad based, well founded energy policy I cited here.

  • Tex928

    No doubt, this is good. Solar needs attention too, and geothermal, and … All forms should be used in geographic areas where they make sense. At the same time people should not be naive by thinking we can escape fossil fuels quickly. The big problem is that the U.S. needs a broad based, well founded*** national energy policy that will address today’s problems with today’s wherewithal (like more oil production, clean-coal technology, etc., that some don’t like), while working toward a more secure (economically, enviornmentally, …) future. The plan needs to be devloped by engineers (like me), not politicians. I think it is almost hopeless though; there are too many special interests, too much ignorance about energy technologies, too much bureaucracy, …

    *** example of this is the push toward ethanol fuel. It was not well founded in that it did not recognize the effect on food prices. Now, the ethanol idea is not all bad, it just needs to be folded into the broad based, well founded energy policy I cited here.

  • PowerEngineer

    Power form wind and solar is a great idea… in theory, but there is one major problem… its not consistent. The sun doesn’t always shine and the wind doesn’t always blow. So what do we do when we hit peak power for the day and theres no wind? we burn coal or natural gas or use nuclear. Wind and solar are great supplements and should be used whenever possible, but everyone needs to understand its not always feasible.

    Also, what about all the land that wind farms and solar panels take up… if we wanted to power the US only wiht solar every single square inch would need to be covered by panels.

  • PowerEngineer

    Power form wind and solar is a great idea… in theory, but there is one major problem… its not consistent. The sun doesn’t always shine and the wind doesn’t always blow. So what do we do when we hit peak power for the day and theres no wind? we burn coal or natural gas or use nuclear. Wind and solar are great supplements and should be used whenever possible, but everyone needs to understand its not always feasible.

    Also, what about all the land that wind farms and solar panels take up… if we wanted to power the US only wiht solar every single square inch would need to be covered by panels.

  • PowerEngineer

    Power form wind and solar is a great idea… in theory, but there is one major problem… its not consistent. The sun doesn’t always shine and the wind doesn’t always blow. So what do we do when we hit peak power for the day and theres no wind? we burn coal or natural gas or use nuclear. Wind and solar are great supplements and should be used whenever possible, but everyone needs to understand its not always feasible.

    Also, what about all the land that wind farms and solar panels take up… if we wanted to power the US only wiht solar every single square inch would need to be covered by panels.

  • http://www.revenuerobot.com androo

    this is great! now we just need some in Florida along the shore lines… (ocean breeze)

  • http://www.revenuerobot.com androo

    this is great! now we just need some in Florida along the shore lines… (ocean breeze)

  • http://www.revenuerobot.com androo

    this is great! now we just need some in Florida along the shore lines… (ocean breeze)

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  • http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2008/jul/25/renewableenergy.alternativeenergy Paul

    Take a look at this guardian article. Seems China will soon have some of the worlds biggest windfarms. Although they refuse to commit to specific targets, the work they are doing looks ambitious and quite promising.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2008/jul/25/renewableenergy.alternativeenergy

  • http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2008/jul/25/renewableenergy.alternativeenergy Paul

    Take a look at this guardian article. Seems China will soon have some of the worlds biggest windfarms. Although they refuse to commit to specific targets, the work they are doing looks ambitious and quite promising.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2008/jul/25/renewableenergy.alternativeenergy

  • http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2008/jul/25/renewableenergy.alternativeenergy Paul

    Take a look at this guardian article. Seems China will soon have some of the worlds biggest windfarms. Although they refuse to commit to specific targets, the work they are doing looks ambitious and quite promising.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2008/jul/25/renewableenergy.alternativeenergy

  • Ernie

    Amazing news!! I am confident that Oregon, though small, leads much of the nation in being “green”. I am very proud to live here.

    That said, what is the hold-up for more of these types of farms? It seems like a no-brainer to me.

    Solar power is following suit closely, keep your eyes peeled!

  • Ernie

    Amazing news!! I am confident that Oregon, though small, leads much of the nation in being “green”. I am very proud to live here.

    That said, what is the hold-up for more of these types of farms? It seems like a no-brainer to me.

    Solar power is following suit closely, keep your eyes peeled!

  • lasse

    Do you know what company will be supplying the windmills?

  • http://zeeol.com/Blog zeeol

    I’m all for this. But the population of Portland is 568,380 so they need to build nearly 3 farms to power just that one city. The awesome thing about this is just how much is needed just to replace the existing power structure. I think that building windmills and solar panels could be the next huge industry for this country.

  • lasse

    Do you know what company will be supplying the windmills?

  • http://zeeol.com/Blog zeeol

    I’m all for this. But the population of Portland is 568,380 so they need to build nearly 3 farms to power just that one city. The awesome thing about this is just how much is needed just to replace the existing power structure. I think that building windmills and solar panels could be the next huge industry for this country.

  • Ariel Schwartz

    Rod – interesting that you say that. I’m an east coaster as well, but I recently moved out west. The amount of open space here still amazes me, and I agree that it does inspire a certain amount of optimism that is difficult to conjure up when you’re from the NYC suburbs (such as myself).

  • Rich

    It’ll be a close one as to whether it will ever be the world’s largest wind farm. The London Array is also due for completion in 2010, will have 341 turbines, and produce 1GW (or 1.5GW – depends who you ask) of power. It will provide power for 750,000 homes – approximately a quarter of London’s homes.

  • Rich

    It’ll be a close one as to whether it will ever be the world’s largest wind farm. The London Array is also due for completion in 2010, will have 341 turbines, and produce 1GW (or 1.5GW – depends who you ask) of power. It will provide power for 750,000 homes – approximately a quarter of London’s homes.

  • Rich

    It’ll be a close one as to whether it will ever be the world’s largest wind farm. The London Array is also due for completion in 2010, will have 341 turbines, and produce 1GW (or 1.5GW – depends who you ask) of power. It will provide power for 750,000 homes – approximately a quarter of London’s homes.

  • http://atomicinsights.blogspot.com Rod Adams

    I think I am finally figuring out why I am such a skeptic about wind and solar power. I have lived almost all of my life on the US east coast where we do not have vast open spaces and desert climates.

    Instead we have extensive forests, densely populated cities, marshes, clouds, rain, cold winters, and still, muggy summers. All of those do not inspire one to think about large wind farms or multi-acre solar arrays. Even rooftop solar is not very inspiring for those of us who purposely plant shade trees to keep our homes cool in the summer or who work in high rise office buildings with roofs that are quite small in relationship to the power consumption inside the building.

    Your associated photo and the ones that I have seen cropping up in Pickens commercials have finally gotten through to me – people who live in the western US simply see the world through a different lens.

  • http://atomicinsights.blogspot.com Rod Adams

    I think I am finally figuring out why I am such a skeptic about wind and solar power. I have lived almost all of my life on the US east coast where we do not have vast open spaces and desert climates.

    Instead we have extensive forests, densely populated cities, marshes, clouds, rain, cold winters, and still, muggy summers. All of those do not inspire one to think about large wind farms or multi-acre solar arrays. Even rooftop solar is not very inspiring for those of us who purposely plant shade trees to keep our homes cool in the summer or who work in high rise office buildings with roofs that are quite small in relationship to the power consumption inside the building.

    Your associated photo and the ones that I have seen cropping up in Pickens commercials have finally gotten through to me – people who live in the western US simply see the world through a different lens.

  • http://atomicinsights.blogspot.com Rod Adams

    I think I am finally figuring out why I am such a skeptic about wind and solar power. I have lived almost all of my life on the US east coast where we do not have vast open spaces and desert climates.

    Instead we have extensive forests, densely populated cities, marshes, clouds, rain, cold winters, and still, muggy summers. All of those do not inspire one to think about large wind farms or multi-acre solar arrays. Even rooftop solar is not very inspiring for those of us who purposely plant shade trees to keep our homes cool in the summer or who work in high rise office buildings with roofs that are quite small in relationship to the power consumption inside the building.

    Your associated photo and the ones that I have seen cropping up in Pickens commercials have finally gotten through to me – people who live in the western US simply see the world through a different lens.

  • indy

    “I don’t see why they would stop using wind power until 100% of the north west’s power was coming from clean, renewable sources. And even then they can start “exporting” it to other regions too…”

    Because renewable energy is inconsistent. Wind peaks in the early a.m. (if at all) and solar mid-day and obviously not at night…

  • indy

    “I don’t see why they would stop using wind power until 100% of the north west’s power was coming from clean, renewable sources. And even then they can start “exporting” it to other regions too…”

    Because renewable energy is inconsistent. Wind peaks in the early a.m. (if at all) and solar mid-day and obviously not at night…

  • http://ipod-converter-soft.blogspot.com/ silencer01

    That is a good news, More and more countries will build wind farm, make the world green and peace.

  • http://ipod-converter-soft.blogspot.com/ silencer01

    That is a good news, More and more countries will build wind farm, make the world green and peace.

  • http://blog.vertography.com/ John (Vertography)

    “Northwest power agencies claim to only be able to handle 1500 more megawatts of wind power on the grid.”

    Not sure why they would single out wind power, after all, once generated it is the same as any other power on the grid. So, if that means their grid can only handle another 1500MW of power, I see two possible options (not mutually exclusive):

    a) Expand the capacity of the grid (based on demand for power of course, not just because we’re generating more);

    b) Switch off some non-renewable fuel power stations, or generate less with them, as wind farms come online.

    I don’t see why they would stop using wind power until 100% of the north west’s power was coming from clean, renewable sources. And even then they can start “exporting” it to other regions too…

  • http://blog.vertography.com/ John (Vertography)

    “Northwest power agencies claim to only be able to handle 1500 more megawatts of wind power on the grid.”

    Not sure why they would single out wind power, after all, once generated it is the same as any other power on the grid. So, if that means their grid can only handle another 1500MW of power, I see two possible options (not mutually exclusive):

    a) Expand the capacity of the grid (based on demand for power of course, not just because we’re generating more);

    b) Switch off some non-renewable fuel power stations, or generate less with them, as wind farms come online.

    I don’t see why they would stop using wind power until 100% of the north west’s power was coming from clean, renewable sources. And even then they can start “exporting” it to other regions too…

  • Ariel Schwartz

    No problem. And I agree – it’s a good thing when we have 2 plans competing for the number 1 spot in the country.

  • http://www.replacingoil.com crenauer

    Thanks Ariel,

    was that last sentence there before? I must be going blind in my old age.

    Whatever the case, it’s exciting to see our vast wind resources being used on such a large scale!

  • http://www.replacingoil.com crenauer

    Thanks Ariel,

    was that last sentence there before? I must be going blind in my old age.

    Whatever the case, it’s exciting to see our vast wind resources being used on such a large scale!

  • Ariel Schwartz

    Crenauer – see the last sentence of the post. The Oregon wind farm is currently further ahead in the planning stages than the Pickens plan (it is scheduled to be completed in 2010, while the Texas farm won’t be ready until 2014)- although you are correct in stating that Pickens’ farm will ultimately produce more energy.

  • http://www.replacingoil.com crenauer

    Am I missing something?

    How is a 303 turbine larger than the upcoming 667 turbine farm being built in Texas by T. Boone Pickens?

    http://www.replacingoil.com/2008/05/t-boone-pickens-building-worlds-largest-wind-farm/

    Are the turbines more than twice the size of the ones in Texas?

  • http://www.replacingoil.com crenauer

    Am I missing something?

    How is a 303 turbine larger than the upcoming 667 turbine farm being built in Texas by T. Boone Pickens?

    http://www.replacingoil.com/2008/05/t-boone-pickens-building-worlds-largest-wind-farm/

    Are the turbines more than twice the size of the ones in Texas?

  • http://www.replacingoil.com crenauer

    Am I missing something?

    How is a 303 turbine larger than the upcoming 667 turbine farm being built in Texas by T. Boone Pickens?

    http://www.replacingoil.com/2008/05/t-boone-pickens-building-worlds-largest-wind-farm/

    Are the turbines more than twice the size of the ones in Texas?

  • http://www.brightfuture.us Tim

    Well gosh darn T Boone Pickens for stealing all the glory from us! Ah well, with all their oil drilling, Texas needs a little help catching up to Oregon on the green curve.

    Really though, this is great news. When I’ve driven through Eastern Oregon and Washington I’ve always noticed a conspicuous absence of windmills on Oregon hilltops in comparison with what’s literally right across the border in Washington. So about time Oregon put in a big project like this. We still have a lot of offshore capacity that I would like to see developed though: Wind Energy in Oregon.

  • http://www.brightfuture.us Tim

    Well gosh darn T Boone Pickens for stealing all the glory from us! Ah well, with all their oil drilling, Texas needs a little help catching up to Oregon on the green curve.

    Really though, this is great news. When I’ve driven through Eastern Oregon and Washington I’ve always noticed a conspicuous absence of windmills on Oregon hilltops in comparison with what’s literally right across the border in Washington. So about time Oregon put in a big project like this. We still have a lot of offshore capacity that I would like to see developed though: Wind Energy in Oregon.

  • http://www.brightfuture.us Tim

    Well gosh darn T Boone Pickens for stealing all the glory from us! Ah well, with all their oil drilling, Texas needs a little help catching up to Oregon on the green curve.

    Really though, this is great news. When I’ve driven through Eastern Oregon and Washington I’ve always noticed a conspicuous absence of windmills on Oregon hilltops in comparison with what’s literally right across the border in Washington. So about time Oregon put in a big project like this. We still have a lot of offshore capacity that I would like to see developed though: Wind Energy in Oregon.

  • larryhagedon

    It just keeps on coming. Folks this is what we need, competing energy sources all building for the future. It all keeps adding up.

    Larryhagedon

    AmericanFlexFuelExperience-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

    http://finance.groups.yahoo.com/group/AmericanFlexFuelExperience/

  • larryhagedon

    It just keeps on coming. Folks this is what we need, competing energy sources all building for the future. It all keeps adding up.

    Larryhagedon

    AmericanFlexFuelExperience-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

    http://finance.groups.yahoo.com/group/AmericanFlexFuelExperience/

  • larryhagedon

    It just keeps on coming. Folks this is what we need, competing energy sources all building for the future. It all keeps adding up.

    Larryhagedon

    AmericanFlexFuelExperience-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

    http://finance.groups.yahoo.com/group/AmericanFlexFuelExperience/

  • Ariel Schwartz

    GB – Duly noted. I’ll fix that.

  • GB

    “That’s enough energy to power 200,000 homes each year.”

    Each year? What is that supposed to mean? We’re talking about power. It should read: That’s enough energy to power 200,000 homes “period”

  • GB

    “That’s enough energy to power 200,000 homes each year.”

    Each year? What is that supposed to mean? We’re talking about power. It should read: That’s enough energy to power 200,000 homes “period”

  • GB

    “That’s enough energy to power 200,000 homes each year.”

    Each year? What is that supposed to mean? We’re talking about power. It should read: That’s enough energy to power 200,000 homes “period”

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