CleanTechnica is the #1 cleantech-focused
website
 in the world. Subscribe today!


Energy Efficiency

Published on July 29th, 2008 | by Joshua S Hill

19

US Army Works to Cut its Carbon "Bootprint"… ba da bum!

Share on Google+Share on RedditShare on StumbleUponTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on FacebookPin on PinterestDigg thisShare on TumblrBuffer this pageEmail this to someone

July 29th, 2008 by
 
533206475_3ad845bad0 In what is just another example in a long stream of such, the US Army is beginning to realize that it is not only good for publicity, but essentially cheaper, to turn their operations green… er. Going green was never solely about making some cheap points on the PR board; it has, from the start, been a cheaper option across the board.

The Army had begun pushing for environmental sustainability in all of their bases, starting with Fort Bragg in North Carolina. And they’re thinking it through as well; not only are they thinking about the current footprint (I’m not going to say it), they’re thinking about the future as well. Since 2001, each village set up within Fort Bragg for training purposes has been made up of shipping containers, reducing the cost from $400,000 to $25,000, and keeping the shipping containers out of the solid waste stream.

But the goal is not solely to save money, but also lives as well.

One of the most common reports we would hear in the early days of the Iraq war and the War on Terror in Afghanistan, would be convoys encountering IED’s, or Improvised Explosive Devices, along the side of the road.

The main reason that these convoys had to make the long trek to the forward command posts was to transfer fuel from A to B. And the more trucks in the convoys, the more soldiers there were, and thus the more risk there was to more people.

“If we can reduce consumption on our forward operating bases by using renewable energy, let’s say wind or solar instead of a diesel generator outside the tent … then we can reduce the number of these supply convoys that need to come forward that are getting hit by these IEDs,” said Tad Davis, deputy assistant secretary for environment, safety and occupational health.

Another saving that the Army has made of late is to spray their tents with foam insulation. After a recent survey of U.S. forward bases in Djibouti, Kuwait, Iraq and Afghanistan showed that 85 percent or more of the power was used for air conditioning, to provide comfort sleeping and keep communications equipment cool, something had to be done. The foam insulation has now shown to cut the loss of energy by 45%.

One aspect of the military that has hit a sticking point in going green is Army vehicles. Keeping our troops safe is a priority, and shouldn’t be put by the sidelines for anything. Hence, many of the vehicles have to rely on heavy armor to prevent lessening the safety for troops inside. However, according to Davis, “There’s emerging technology that is providing lighter-weight armor, so I think at some point … you’re going to see more hybrid vehicles in the tactical military fleet.”

And as for the notion that the US military is the world’s biggest emitter of greenhouse gasses on the planet, Davis questions the notion, and hopes that an online tracking program started in June will bring a favorable result.

Source

U.S. Army photo by Pfc. Micah E. Clare

Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.

Print Friendly

Share on Google+Share on RedditShare on StumbleUponTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on FacebookPin on PinterestDigg thisShare on TumblrBuffer this pageEmail this to someone

Tags: , , , , , , ,


About the Author

I'm a Christian, a nerd, a geek, a liberal left-winger, and believe that we're pretty quickly directing planet-Earth into hell in a handbasket! I also write for Fantasy Book Review (.co.uk), and can be found writing articles for a variety of other sites. Check me out at about.me for more.



  • http://Super-Therm.com David

    Foam is not the best solution at all to insulate tents in hot environments. It’s too bulky, it absorbs and holds heat in, it offgasses over time and it deteriorates. A ceramic insulation coating (Super Therm)is significantly thinner (only 10 dry mils) is flexible, is lighter and is non-deteriorating and does NOT absorb heat therefore there is less load on the airconditioning equipment and less reliance on such equipment.

  • http://Super-Therm.com David

    Foam is not the best solution at all to insulate tents in hot environments. It’s too bulky, it absorbs and holds heat in, it offgasses over time and it deteriorates. A ceramic insulation coating (Super Therm)is significantly thinner (only 10 dry mils) is flexible, is lighter and is non-deteriorating and does NOT absorb heat therefore there is less load on the airconditioning equipment and less reliance on such equipment.

  • Pingback: Army Wants to Build World’s Most Powerful Solar Array : CleanTechnica

  • http://www.sprayfoam.biz/ Brett

    Another saving that the Army has made of late is to spray their tents with foam insulation. After a recent survey of U.S. forward bases in Djibouti, Kuwait, Iraq and Afghanistan showed that 85 percent or more of the power was used for air conditioning, to provide comfort sleeping and keep communications equipment cool, something had to be done. The foam insulation has now shown to cut the loss of energy by 45%.

  • http://www.sprayfoam.biz/ Brett

    Another saving that the Army has made of late is to spray their tents with foam insulation. After a recent survey of U.S. forward bases in Djibouti, Kuwait, Iraq and Afghanistan showed that 85 percent or more of the power was used for air conditioning, to provide comfort sleeping and keep communications equipment cool, something had to be done. The foam insulation has now shown to cut the loss of energy by 45%.

  • http://www.sprayfoam.biz/ James

    Another saving that the Army has made of late is to spray their tents with foam insulation. After a recent survey of U.S. forward bases in Djibouti, Kuwait, Iraq and Afghanistan showed that 85 percent or more of the power was used for air conditioning, to provide comfort sleeping and keep communications equipment cool, something had to be done.

  • http://www.sprayfoam.biz/ James

    Another saving that the Army has made of late is to spray their tents with foam insulation. After a recent survey of U.S. forward bases in Djibouti, Kuwait, Iraq and Afghanistan showed that 85 percent or more of the power was used for air conditioning, to provide comfort sleeping and keep communications equipment cool, something had to be done.

  • Tyler

    That’s good I guess. But it’s not the Army who should be going green, it’s the entire civilian population that should.

  • davewill

    @cj given that ranchland is some of the most depleted in terms of soil and biodiversity you can’t really expect anyone here to agree with you can you?

    The Army have been pretty damn good environmental stewards of the lands under their management (see Fort Hunter-Liggett in CA as probably the finest example)

  • davewill

    @cj given that ranchland is some of the most depleted in terms of soil and biodiversity you can’t really expect anyone here to agree with you can you?

    The Army have been pretty damn good environmental stewards of the lands under their management (see Fort Hunter-Liggett in CA as probably the finest example)

  • Tyler

    That’s good I guess. But it’s not the Army who should be going green, it’s the entire civilian population that should.

  • Pingback: Deliggit.com | The social sites' most interesting urls

  • http://zeeol.com/Blog zeeol

    This isn’t really that surprising. The Department of Defense and various military branches (esp. the Navy) were some of the first to adopt alternative energy programs such as using biodiesel in military vehicles. But they’d use synfuel made from coal in a hot second if it was cheaper. So I guess you have to conflate green with the bottom line…

  • http://zeeol.com/Blog zeeol

    This isn’t really that surprising. The Department of Defense and various military branches (esp. the Navy) were some of the first to adopt alternative energy programs such as using biodiesel in military vehicles. But they’d use synfuel made from coal in a hot second if it was cheaper. So I guess you have to conflate green with the bottom line…

  • cj

    If the army is so interested in going green, why are they trying to take prime ranchland and intact short grass prairie in se colorado. I mean the entire se quadrant of the state of colorado. I suggest you check out pinon canyon.

  • cj

    If the army is so interested in going green, why are they trying to take prime ranchland and intact short grass prairie in se colorado. I mean the entire se quadrant of the state of colorado. I suggest you check out pinon canyon.

  • Pingback: Politics in the Zeros. Anti-war, global warming, peak oil, progressive politics » US Army wants to get green too

  • Gustavion

    It’s great to see the army take the lead in the eco movement. We, as consumers, need to follow suit. I think it important for us to support businesses that not only provide a desirable utility but also benefit the environment. For example, http://www.simplestop.net stops your postal junk mail and benefits the environment.

  • Gustavion

    It’s great to see the army take the lead in the eco movement. We, as consumers, need to follow suit. I think it important for us to support businesses that not only provide a desirable utility but also benefit the environment. For example, http://www.simplestop.net stops your postal junk mail and benefits the environment.

Back to Top ↑