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Cars obama energy policy

Published on June 5th, 2008 | by Sarah Lozanova

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Obama's Plan to Reduce Foreign Oil Dependence

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June 5th, 2008 by  


obama energy policyAs Americans spend $41 million in foreign oil an hour and are left broke at the pump, what plan does Obama have to solve this problem?

Oil is destined to be a heated issue in this upcoming presidential election and Barack Obama’s opposition to the gas tax “holiday” has already been a hot topic. Obama has made it clear that national energy policy needs to be taken in a new direction.

“We send a billion dollars to foreign nations every single day and we are melting the polar ice caps in the bargain,” said Obama. “That has to change.”

Here are some of the key elements of Obama’s energy plan:

Fuel Economy Standards

Doubling fuel economy standards within the next 18 years is a priority to Obama. Research in engines and advanced lightweight materials will help meet this goal. He also wants to assist auto makers in increasing fuel economy standards through loan guarantees and tax credits for domestic auto manufacturers.

“We are going to raise fuel efficiency standards on cars because that is the only way that we can actually lower gas prices over the long-term and I know you need that,” said Obama.

Next Generation Biofuels

Obama’s goal is to have two billion gallons of cellulosic ethanol in use by 2013. He plans to use tax incentives, government contracts and cash prizes to help this industry mature and specifically wants to encourage farmer-owned refineries. He would like renewable fuel standards to increase, such that 60 billion gallons of advanced biofuels are in the fuel supply by 2030.

A National Low Carbon Fuel Standard is a mechanism that Obama plans to use that requires fuel suppliers to decrease carbon emissions from fuels by 10% by 2020 and he specifically wants to encourage non-petroleum fuels to reach this target.

“The only way we are going to seriously reduce the price of gas is if we actually start investing in alternative fuels and we raise fuel standards on cars,” said Obama.

solar panel installationRenewable Energy

By 2025, Obama would like 25% of U.S. electricity to be generated from clean, renewable sources including wind, solar and geothermal with a Renewable Portfolio Standard. Obama calls for $150 billion to be invested over 10 years in clean energy and infrastructure to support it. Investment in a national digital electric grid would allow greater amounts of renewable energy to be utilized and make plug-in hybrids more environmentally sound.

“For the sake of our security, our economy, our jobs and our planet, the age of oil must end in our time,” said Obama.

Sarah Lozanova is passionate about the new green economy and is a regular contributor to environmental and energy publications and websites, including Energy International Quarterly, ThinkGreen.com, Triple Pundit, Green Business Quarterly, Renewable Energy World, and Green Business Quarterly. Her experience includes work with small-scale solar energy installations and utility-scale wind farms. She earned an MBA in sustainable management from the Presidio Graduate School and is a co-founder of Trees Across the Miles, an urban reforestation initiative.

Related Posts on Renewable Energy:

Germans Debate Renewable Energy Supports

Solar Thermal Electricity: Can it Replace Coal, Gas, and Oil

Consumer-First Energy Act of 2008 Lacks Support

Congressional Bills that Address Climate Change

Image credit: Radiospike Photography at Flickr under a Creative Commons license

Lower Image Credit: Compliments of Solar Service Inc.

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About the Author

is passionate about the new green economy and renewable energy. Sarah's experience includes work with small-scale solar energy installations and utility-scale wind farms. She earned an MBA in sustainable management from the Presidio Graduate School and is a co-founder of Trees Across the Miles, an urban reforestation initiative. When she can escape the internet vortex, she enjoys playing in the forest, paddling down rivers, or twisting into yoga poses.



  • Justinc

    4 years later.. and how much of this was done? ZIP. What a smooth talker, but a complete failure. Wool over the eyes. And you dumb sheep fell for it.

    • Bob_Wallace

      Are you lying or misinformed?

      If misinformed, get back to us and we’ll try to bring you up to speed.

      (I’m pretty sure you’re lying, but just in case….)

      • http://profile.yahoo.com/FXZPNZ5TZ5JD6U4GTJ4QWX5OII Purple

        actually Justin is right whats happenin is “we are drilling our way out” with horizontal drilling and fracking. definitely not what Obama wanted in 2008.

        • Bob_Wallace

          CAFE standards have been increased. They will

          increase each year until they have doubled in 2025.

          We have not started making cellulose ethanol.

          During the first half of 2012 we obtained 5.7% of our electricity from non-hydro renewables (3.5% from wind).

          Two out of three.

          Yes, we are now producing more oil in-country due to new drilling techniques, but that doesn’t deal with our climate problems. That problem can only be dealt with by cutting our oil (and other fossil fuel) usage.

          More in-country oil production does help the country in the short term. It lowers our balance of trade problem, it decreases the leverage of the “oil sheiks”, and it means that our oil is coming from wells that operate under tighter environmental controls.

          Long term – higher mileage requirements (done), more non-petroleum liquid fuel options (underway), and a lot more renewable electricity generation (going gangbusters).

  • joejo

    Wind Is the key way out of this America has the most wind production any where else in the world and is conveniatly located right in the middle of America we can use that until they find another resource.

    vist Pickensplan.org

  • joejo

    Wind Is the key way out of this America has the most wind production any where else in the world and is conveniatly located right in the middle of America we can use that until they find another resource.

    vist Pickensplan.org

  • tyler g

    OBAMA 4 EVER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • tyler g

    OBAMA 4 EVER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • http://www.GasRhonda.myffi.biz Rhonda

    There is a product right now that can increase your gas mileage 10-14%, reduce emissions 75%.

    It works. I’ve been using it in a 2007 Toyota for a year. Is easy to use, pop a pill in the tank.

    Mechanics use it and have tested it. Has had thousands and thousands of controlled mile testing, but hey, until gas hit $3.

    If every car on the road was using it, folks would save money, clear the air, & reduce foreign oil dependence. It’s used worldwide.

    A trucker saving $13,000 a year. Another saving half on his fuel bill. It is here and now folks. http://www.GasRhonda.myffi.biz

    Don’t mean to step on any toes, but google the Obama UN bill. Is that before or after we give $845 billion to the UN in our tax dollars?

  • http://www.GasRhonda.myffi.biz Rhonda

    There is a product right now that can increase your gas mileage 10-14%, reduce emissions 75%.

    It works. I’ve been using it in a 2007 Toyota for a year. Is easy to use, pop a pill in the tank.

    Mechanics use it and have tested it. Has had thousands and thousands of controlled mile testing, but hey, until gas hit $3.

    If every car on the road was using it, folks would save money, clear the air, & reduce foreign oil dependence. It’s used worldwide.

    A trucker saving $13,000 a year. Another saving half on his fuel bill. It is here and now folks. http://www.GasRhonda.myffi.biz

    Don’t mean to step on any toes, but google the Obama UN bill. Is that before or after we give $845 billion to the UN in our tax dollars?

  • Pingback: Obama?s Plan to Reduce Foreign Oil Dependence « Quilt Racks

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  • http://www.congresscheck.com/tag/pakistani-isi/ Pakistani ISI

    The love of liberty is the love of others; the love of power is the love of ourselves.WilliamHazlittWilliam Hazlitt

  • http://www.congresscheck.com/tag/pakistani-isi/ Pakistani ISI

    The love of liberty is the love of others; the love of power is the love of ourselves.WilliamHazlittWilliam Hazlitt

  • http://www.ghgblog.com Karlamandabell

    It is not clear enough what the plan is by Barack Obama. Today Barack Obama committed himself in Berlin to stand as one on Climate Change and he said he wants to save the planet. How?www.lamarguerite.wordpress.com . The comments on this blog echo my thoughts. What is the plan for weaning us off our dependence on oil and will car manufacturers start making vehicles that use alternative fuels? How does that dove-tail in with his plans for the middle-east?The world community needs to know what is Barack Obama’s plan.

    Andy Grove of Harvard Business School and former head of Intel Corp is unimpressed with the energy policies of the leading presidential candidates, Republican Senator John McCain and Barack Obama. Grove maintains the most important issue is getting away from the dependence on oil, not moving to renewable energy by 2018, as recommended by Al Gore which `is addressing the second most important problem,” Grove said.

    Carmakers should adopt open-source policies to share technology and commit to honoring warranties when consumers do such modifications. Grove says he is encouraged by conversions of pickups and other autos that have been done by individuals and small shops for years. Batteries and motors are installed to add all- electric range and reduce vehicle’s gasoline use.

    “I would love to give a lot of light and limelight to these people who have been doing this in their garages because there are a lot of them,” Grove said. “This is how the computer industry became a very large industry.” http://www.bloomberg.com

    Grove is calling for the U.S. to offer tax credits or interest-free loans to retrofit vehicles. Grove maintains, “All these objections are absolutely valid in a peace state,” said Grove, such as high costs, a lack of batteries sturdy enough for daily use, no recharging infrastructure, and harmful environmental effects if coal-fired plants are the main energy source are not valid in these times.

    In Silicon Valley, Grove is prodding venture capitalists to fund electric vehicle technologies and he is aiming to tap the entrepreneurial drive that led the region to dominate software and Internet businesses.

    find out more at: http://www.ghgblog.com

  • http://www.ghgblog.com Karlamandabell

    It is not clear enough what the plan is by Barack Obama. Today Barack Obama committed himself in Berlin to stand as one on Climate Change and he said he wants to save the planet. How?www.lamarguerite.wordpress.com . The comments on this blog echo my thoughts. What is the plan for weaning us off our dependence on oil and will car manufacturers start making vehicles that use alternative fuels? How does that dove-tail in with his plans for the middle-east?The world community needs to know what is Barack Obama’s plan.

    Andy Grove of Harvard Business School and former head of Intel Corp is unimpressed with the energy policies of the leading presidential candidates, Republican Senator John McCain and Barack Obama. Grove maintains the most important issue is getting away from the dependence on oil, not moving to renewable energy by 2018, as recommended by Al Gore which `is addressing the second most important problem,” Grove said.

    Carmakers should adopt open-source policies to share technology and commit to honoring warranties when consumers do such modifications. Grove says he is encouraged by conversions of pickups and other autos that have been done by individuals and small shops for years. Batteries and motors are installed to add all- electric range and reduce vehicle’s gasoline use.

    “I would love to give a lot of light and limelight to these people who have been doing this in their garages because there are a lot of them,” Grove said. “This is how the computer industry became a very large industry.” http://www.bloomberg.com

    Grove is calling for the U.S. to offer tax credits or interest-free loans to retrofit vehicles. Grove maintains, “All these objections are absolutely valid in a peace state,” said Grove, such as high costs, a lack of batteries sturdy enough for daily use, no recharging infrastructure, and harmful environmental effects if coal-fired plants are the main energy source are not valid in these times.

    In Silicon Valley, Grove is prodding venture capitalists to fund electric vehicle technologies and he is aiming to tap the entrepreneurial drive that led the region to dominate software and Internet businesses.

    find out more at: http://www.ghgblog.com

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  • Mr.Jones

    Well karl things like this cant change over night otherwise you would crash the whole economy (for the U.S. we need oil for our economy to work)

  • http://www.damonclifford.com/blog/ Damon Clifford

    Sarah,

    I like your review on both of the presidential candidates energy policy.

    Each of the plans have pluses and minus, but neither of them matter if they don’t execute, actually implement their plan, and see them through while their in office.

    I think the bigger question to ask is which president will better execute their plan?

    Damon

  • http://www.damonclifford.com/blog/ Damon Clifford

    Sarah,

    I like your review on both of the presidential candidates energy policy.

    Each of the plans have pluses and minus, but neither of them matter if they don’t execute, actually implement their plan, and see them through while their in office.

    I think the bigger question to ask is which president will better execute their plan?

    Damon

  • Bill

    Please Pete, get real. Quit buying from ExxonMobil? They don’t care, they’ll just sell to China or India. I was just informed that gas in Taiwan is $10/liter. I’m sure they’d love to buy more. Besides, Exxon is offloading their service stations because the margin for gasoline at the retail level is so little. All you do is hurt the independent business owner.

    Yes, we need to do a lot of things and do them quickly. The first is for every American to put pressure on his or her representatives in Washington and their respective states to do everything they can “for the American people” to reduce energy costs by exploring and producing energy sources here in the US. That includes oil, clean coal, nuclear, solar, wind.

    If the car dealers can change from trucks to hybrids in less than two years on the assembly line then they can change from 20mpg vehicles to 50mpg vehicles in five years.

    And don’t forget common sense transit systems that are driven by need and not special interests. Goes back to those elected officials.

    Oh, and last, who is making the most from all of this? The government of the US in your taxes. And why don’t they change? Special interests. You as a citizen are not putting pressure on them yet to represent you. It doesn’t matter what party they’re in, once they’re in office most stop representing you and me. Didn’t they just decide to end debate on extending tax credits for renewable energy research and development????? Why? Could the answer lie with those special interests, who ar non American, who hold the purse strings of our national debt?

    I know, there’s a lot here, but nothing can be done unless it starts with each citizen and their individual representatives in their state capital and Washington DC. Get personal with them on a regular basis and let them know they won’t be there unless they represent you!

  • Bill

    Please Pete, get real. Quit buying from ExxonMobil? They don’t care, they’ll just sell to China or India. I was just informed that gas in Taiwan is $10/liter. I’m sure they’d love to buy more. Besides, Exxon is offloading their service stations because the margin for gasoline at the retail level is so little. All you do is hurt the independent business owner.

    Yes, we need to do a lot of things and do them quickly. The first is for every American to put pressure on his or her representatives in Washington and their respective states to do everything they can “for the American people” to reduce energy costs by exploring and producing energy sources here in the US. That includes oil, clean coal, nuclear, solar, wind.

    If the car dealers can change from trucks to hybrids in less than two years on the assembly line then they can change from 20mpg vehicles to 50mpg vehicles in five years.

    And don’t forget common sense transit systems that are driven by need and not special interests. Goes back to those elected officials.

    Oh, and last, who is making the most from all of this? The government of the US in your taxes. And why don’t they change? Special interests. You as a citizen are not putting pressure on them yet to represent you. It doesn’t matter what party they’re in, once they’re in office most stop representing you and me. Didn’t they just decide to end debate on extending tax credits for renewable energy research and development????? Why? Could the answer lie with those special interests, who ar non American, who hold the purse strings of our national debt?

    I know, there’s a lot here, but nothing can be done unless it starts with each citizen and their individual representatives in their state capital and Washington DC. Get personal with them on a regular basis and let them know they won’t be there unless they represent you!

  • Sarah Lozanova

    The margin for Exxon for retail gas is about 10-15% and it is about three times that amount for crude oil production.

    http://www.reuters.com/article/wtMostRead/idUSN1238193020080612?pageNumber=2&virtualBrandChannel=0

  • Sarah Lozanova

    The margin for Exxon for retail gas is about 10-15% and it is about three times that amount for crude oil production.

    http://www.reuters.com/article/wtMostRead/idUSN1238193020080612?pageNumber=2&virtualBrandChannel=0

  • http://AvangionQ.stumbleupon.com AvangionQ

    Putting petroleum, alternative energy, renewable energy and our upcoming energy crisis at the forefront of political discussion will be the fastest way to bring about the political will necessary to overcome the upcoming energy crisis …

  • http://AvangionQ.stumbleupon.com AvangionQ

    Putting petroleum, alternative energy, renewable energy and our upcoming energy crisis at the forefront of political discussion will be the fastest way to bring about the political will necessary to overcome the upcoming energy crisis …

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  • Bill

    Obama is easing into the energy problem – he’s not in charge yet, and this is a country who elected the GW Bush disaster not once, but twice. This is a radical concept for the O’Rly set to grasp as it is.

    Once the masses begin to see their world isn’t going to fall apart without their precious SUV’s – we can take steps toward real solutions.

  • Bill

    Obama is easing into the energy problem – he’s not in charge yet, and this is a country who elected the GW Bush disaster not once, but twice. This is a radical concept for the O’Rly set to grasp as it is.

    Once the masses begin to see their world isn’t going to fall apart without their precious SUV’s – we can take steps toward real solutions.

    • esmeralda mendes

      “the masses???”

      marxist swine.

  • mark

    Alot of hot air that will cost billions in tax dollars that he doesn’t say where they will come from.

    Sure, lets just mandate detroit have cars that get 200mpg. Wouldn’t that just solve the problem?

    We will come up with good alternatives, but to not bankrupt the country, it will take 20 to 40 years. In the meantime, we sit here with our thumbs up our butts buying oil from the Arabs, and let envirowhackos like O bama and friends tell us we can’t drill in the US. We have tons of oil here, but we are blocked from getting it. Had Clinton not blocked Anwar in 1996, we’d already be getting a ton from there today.

    Solving the made up global warming issue AND lowering the cost of energy in the next 20 years are INCOMPATIBLE objectives.

    Decide what is more important, the Polar Bear, or the US and world economy…

  • mark

    Alot of hot air that will cost billions in tax dollars that he doesn’t say where they will come from.

    Sure, lets just mandate detroit have cars that get 200mpg. Wouldn’t that just solve the problem?

    We will come up with good alternatives, but to not bankrupt the country, it will take 20 to 40 years. In the meantime, we sit here with our thumbs up our butts buying oil from the Arabs, and let envirowhackos like O bama and friends tell us we can’t drill in the US. We have tons of oil here, but we are blocked from getting it. Had Clinton not blocked Anwar in 1996, we’d already be getting a ton from there today.

    Solving the made up global warming issue AND lowering the cost of energy in the next 20 years are INCOMPATIBLE objectives.

    Decide what is more important, the Polar Bear, or the US and world economy…

  • Joe

    to be generated from clean, renewable sources including wind, solar and geothermal…

    Actually, none of those are “renewable” sources. And the last — geothermal — it the most unreliable of them all. One good earthquake and the source dries up.

    ——-

    Apparently you don’t understand what renewable is. They are renewable energy sources. The wind doesn’t run out forever like oil. I think you need some basic education.

  • Joe

    to be generated from clean, renewable sources including wind, solar and geothermal…

    Actually, none of those are “renewable” sources. And the last — geothermal — it the most unreliable of them all. One good earthquake and the source dries up.

    ——-

    Apparently you don’t understand what renewable is. They are renewable energy sources. The wind doesn’t run out forever like oil. I think you need some basic education.

  • Jeremy

    In response to Pete’s comment about not buying gas from Exxon and Mobile in order to reduce gas prices I say, the last thing this country needs to do is reduce gas prices. Just this past year millions of peoples are driving less, using more mass transit, walking and biking to work, and flying less. High gas prices lead to fewer carbon emissions. It also makes alternative fuels more viable and increases demand for fuel efficient vehicles, hybrid and electric cars.

    Despite the obvious drawbacks (increased food and shipping costs, and pain in the pocket book for those who still have to commute by car) the benefits to high fuel prices are too many to ignore. It’s the only way to really change Americans’ habits and begin the transition away from a carbon economy. I can’t wait for $5.00 or $7.00 a gallon gas!

  • Jeremy

    In response to Pete’s comment about not buying gas from Exxon and Mobile in order to reduce gas prices I say, the last thing this country needs to do is reduce gas prices. Just this past year millions of peoples are driving less, using more mass transit, walking and biking to work, and flying less. High gas prices lead to fewer carbon emissions. It also makes alternative fuels more viable and increases demand for fuel efficient vehicles, hybrid and electric cars.

    Despite the obvious drawbacks (increased food and shipping costs, and pain in the pocket book for those who still have to commute by car) the benefits to high fuel prices are too many to ignore. It’s the only way to really change Americans’ habits and begin the transition away from a carbon economy. I can’t wait for $5.00 or $7.00 a gallon gas!

  • Kurt

    Obama’s jet uses more fuel on the runway then my SUV uses all year. The way to save fuel is make the politicians take the bus. What ever happened to lead by example?

  • Kurt

    Obama’s jet uses more fuel on the runway then my SUV uses all year. The way to save fuel is make the politicians take the bus. What ever happened to lead by example?

  • john

    “Mia Wandizbig said on June 5th, 2008 at 9:13 pm

    Simple, buy oil from Venezuela and quit worrying about the damn Saudi’s”

    The majority America’s oil comes from Canada and Mexico; Valuation is set according to world market prices. Venezuela gets its oil cheap because their industry is nationalized.

    Gasoline in the U.S. is still much cheaper than in Canada(US$5.30/gallon) and Europe (US$7.50++/gallon). take comfort in that.

  • john

    “Mia Wandizbig said on June 5th, 2008 at 9:13 pm

    Simple, buy oil from Venezuela and quit worrying about the damn Saudi’s”

    The majority America’s oil comes from Canada and Mexico; Valuation is set according to world market prices. Venezuela gets its oil cheap because their industry is nationalized.

    Gasoline in the U.S. is still much cheaper than in Canada(US$5.30/gallon) and Europe (US$7.50++/gallon). take comfort in that.

  • Nick

    Actually, cellulosic ethanol isn’t coming from food. Do your homework. Also, there’s a big spin campaign from an oil lobbying organization called, i think, The American Petroleum Institute, who’s fighting for oil to remain the only major energy source. it’s called the “Fuel or Food” campaign to spin the argument in their favor. There is still a TON of additional arable land that can be cultivated in the US alone to make ethanol. In fact, some of the waste product from these types of ethanols are more effective as animal feed than corn, more efficient and making animals something like 15% larger, ultimately.

    The ethanol=food argument is entirely too simplistic and demands further investigation if you’re going to criticize it. Like criticize it for the possibility of additional methane being released into the atmosphere, which is a possibility.

  • Nick

    Actually, cellulosic ethanol isn’t coming from food. Do your homework. Also, there’s a big spin campaign from an oil lobbying organization called, i think, The American Petroleum Institute, who’s fighting for oil to remain the only major energy source. it’s called the “Fuel or Food” campaign to spin the argument in their favor. There is still a TON of additional arable land that can be cultivated in the US alone to make ethanol. In fact, some of the waste product from these types of ethanols are more effective as animal feed than corn, more efficient and making animals something like 15% larger, ultimately.

    The ethanol=food argument is entirely too simplistic and demands further investigation if you’re going to criticize it. Like criticize it for the possibility of additional methane being released into the atmosphere, which is a possibility.

  • Kevin

    Obama will do nothing to lower the price of fuel, period. Democrats want higher fuel prices and always have. Read Al Gore’s book, where he calls for higher taxes on fuel to spur development of substitutions and encourage conservation.

    We need more oil, period. All the rest are just pipe dreams that we’ve been hearing about since the 1970’s. Solar, wind, bio-fuels, etc. can never replace oil as the fuel of our economy. The government will simply have more federal programs and take money from its citizens and the producers of energy and give it to their buddies in the alternative energy “business”, which has never made a profit without heavy government subsidies. If alternative energy is a viable option, companies and researchers would be rushing to bring these profit making technologies to market, without government assistance.

    Imports are not “Evil”, the top four importers of oil to the U.S., in order are; Canada, Saudi Arabia, Mexico, Nigeria and Venezuela. The U.S. could certainly do more to allow drilling in all 50 states and offshore. There is no valid economic or environmental reason to not drill for oil wherever we can find it. What is the moral difference between allowing drilling in the “pristine” Saudi deserts and not allow drilling in the “pristine” Arctic National Wildlife (ANWR) reserve? Who knows are untapped reserves are located in the 30.400 square miles of land, equal to the size of the entire nation of Scotland? The 1,500 people who visit ANWR each year would likely never see an oil rig in their travel if drill where allowed and we could increase our domestic production of oil by 25%, no small amount.

    Oil company profits account for 4% of the price of gas at the pump, which includes exploration, drilling, transporting, refining and distribution and all overhead associated with conducting their business. The Government adds another 15% to the price at the pump in taxes for doing, ZIP, ZERO, NOTHING. They just steel from us and claim it goes to build roads, bridges, etc.

    The only thing a president Obama could do to lower the price of gas at the pump would be to Nuke China & India, to reduce demand. This is actually more likely to happen, than the other alternative, eliminating all federal and state taxes on fuel.

  • Kevin

    Obama will do nothing to lower the price of fuel, period. Democrats want higher fuel prices and always have. Read Al Gore’s book, where he calls for higher taxes on fuel to spur development of substitutions and encourage conservation.

    We need more oil, period. All the rest are just pipe dreams that we’ve been hearing about since the 1970’s. Solar, wind, bio-fuels, etc. can never replace oil as the fuel of our economy. The government will simply have more federal programs and take money from its citizens and the producers of energy and give it to their buddies in the alternative energy “business”, which has never made a profit without heavy government subsidies. If alternative energy is a viable option, companies and researchers would be rushing to bring these profit making technologies to market, without government assistance.

    Imports are not “Evil”, the top four importers of oil to the U.S., in order are; Canada, Saudi Arabia, Mexico, Nigeria and Venezuela. The U.S. could certainly do more to allow drilling in all 50 states and offshore. There is no valid economic or environmental reason to not drill for oil wherever we can find it. What is the moral difference between allowing drilling in the “pristine” Saudi deserts and not allow drilling in the “pristine” Arctic National Wildlife (ANWR) reserve? Who knows are untapped reserves are located in the 30.400 square miles of land, equal to the size of the entire nation of Scotland? The 1,500 people who visit ANWR each year would likely never see an oil rig in their travel if drill where allowed and we could increase our domestic production of oil by 25%, no small amount.

    Oil company profits account for 4% of the price of gas at the pump, which includes exploration, drilling, transporting, refining and distribution and all overhead associated with conducting their business. The Government adds another 15% to the price at the pump in taxes for doing, ZIP, ZERO, NOTHING. They just steel from us and claim it goes to build roads, bridges, etc.

    The only thing a president Obama could do to lower the price of gas at the pump would be to Nuke China & India, to reduce demand. This is actually more likely to happen, than the other alternative, eliminating all federal and state taxes on fuel.

  • Perry

    Karl, there’s a difference between the ethanol production we’re all used to an cellulose ethanol. Read up champ, before your ignorance spreads.

  • Perry

    Karl, there’s a difference between the ethanol production we’re all used to an cellulose ethanol. Read up champ, before your ignorance spreads.

  • christina

    To all you guys complaining about ethanol…

    if you had googled the term “cellulosic ethanol” you would have found out in about 3 seconds that it is NOT the same thing as ethanol from products like corn!

    Cellulosic ethanol is basically dead plants and the waste generated from plants and other natural sources like switchgrass and woodchips. This would not necessarily mean growing food to feed the cars, but using what we already have.

    Just look it up.

  • christina

    To all you guys complaining about ethanol…

    if you had googled the term “cellulosic ethanol” you would have found out in about 3 seconds that it is NOT the same thing as ethanol from products like corn!

    Cellulosic ethanol is basically dead plants and the waste generated from plants and other natural sources like switchgrass and woodchips. This would not necessarily mean growing food to feed the cars, but using what we already have.

    Just look it up.

  • Chris Foster

    These are all really swell IDEAS; they are, however, not an energy POLICY. Specifically, an energy policy would include how this would all be paid for. Where does this money come from for “cash prizes?” Where do we make up lost revenue for tax incentives, etc.?

    I’m sure not overjoyed about the alternative, (McCain) but these sorts of grandiose ideas without any real-world thought as to how to implement them is exactly the sort of thing that Obama is quite justly criticized for.

  • Chris Foster

    These are all really swell IDEAS; they are, however, not an energy POLICY. Specifically, an energy policy would include how this would all be paid for. Where does this money come from for “cash prizes?” Where do we make up lost revenue for tax incentives, etc.?

    I’m sure not overjoyed about the alternative, (McCain) but these sorts of grandiose ideas without any real-world thought as to how to implement them is exactly the sort of thing that Obama is quite justly criticized for.

  • Joe

    @ karl

    “yeah, because nothing can go wrong with using FOOD as fuel.”

    Uh, the whole point of cellulosic ethanol is that you DON’T have to use food grade products, you can use everything from sawdust to lawn clippings.

  • Joe

    @ karl

    “yeah, because nothing can go wrong with using FOOD as fuel.”

    Uh, the whole point of cellulosic ethanol is that you DON’T have to use food grade products, you can use everything from sawdust to lawn clippings.

  • 30meridian

    sold my truck…bought a scooter and a bicycle. maybe not practical for everyone, but if it is you should definitely consider…no more insurance payments + i feel better already from the exercise. the bike is free to ride and i get 80+ mpg on the scooter.

  • 30meridian

    sold my truck…bought a scooter and a bicycle. maybe not practical for everyone, but if it is you should definitely consider…no more insurance payments + i feel better already from the exercise. the bike is free to ride and i get 80+ mpg on the scooter.

  • Bob

    How about that fact that oil companies don’t make that much money on the dollar for gas 8 cents whereas other companies such as pharmaceutical companies make around 30 cents.

  • Thomas

    LOL @ The ignorant UK citizen.

    Have you ever stopped to think that your “soooo expensive” $9 per L. Here’s a few things to consider:

    1) How’s that government sponsored FREE HEALTHCARE THAT YOUR GOVERNMENT PAYS FOR?

    2) How about your overall taxes?

    3) Your country is so much smalled/condensed than ours

    4) Other social services programs?

    You have to remember the average American drives about 25 miles to work. 25 miles. I bet you drive 25 miles once a week On top of that, WE DONT GET FREE UNIVERSAL HEALTHCARE. On top of that, we lose 35% of our paychecks – and we’re pegged and dimed with 10% taxes just about everywhere else.

    I’m sure if we were provided healthcare for free, our gas would be $7-8 a gallon, too. But we’re not..

  • Thomas

    LOL @ The ignorant UK citizen.

    Have you ever stopped to think that your “soooo expensive” $9 per L. Here’s a few things to consider:

    1) How’s that government sponsored FREE HEALTHCARE THAT YOUR GOVERNMENT PAYS FOR?

    2) How about your overall taxes?

    3) Your country is so much smalled/condensed than ours

    4) Other social services programs?

    You have to remember the average American drives about 25 miles to work. 25 miles. I bet you drive 25 miles once a week On top of that, WE DONT GET FREE UNIVERSAL HEALTHCARE. On top of that, we lose 35% of our paychecks – and we’re pegged and dimed with 10% taxes just about everywhere else.

    I’m sure if we were provided healthcare for free, our gas would be $7-8 a gallon, too. But we’re not..

  • ChrisK

    Whoa…

    Obama also mentioned the need to expand mass transit infrastructure. Trains running on steel rails, using electric motors can be significantly more efficient at transporting either people and freight than rubber-wheeled vehicles.

    Obama actually understands that transit and smart growth go together and they’re part of a greener and less oil-dependent future.

  • yoda callmesome

    The key points here are:

    1.) Reduce demand. Although it is doubtful we will ever see cheap gas again, using it wisely is at least sane. Under Bush, people were actually receiving subsidies for wasting fuel.

    2.) There is a definite concern about using food for fuel. One of the best alternatives is seaweed cellulose.

    3.) Increasing fuel mileage standards actually creates jobs.

    4.) Investment in solar/wind technologies is long overdue. Or perhaps we should just sit on our hands and let China develop the technology?

  • yoda callmesome

    The key points here are:

    1.) Reduce demand. Although it is doubtful we will ever see cheap gas again, using it wisely is at least sane. Under Bush, people were actually receiving subsidies for wasting fuel.

    2.) There is a definite concern about using food for fuel. One of the best alternatives is seaweed cellulose.

    3.) Increasing fuel mileage standards actually creates jobs.

    4.) Investment in solar/wind technologies is long overdue. Or perhaps we should just sit on our hands and let China develop the technology?

  • GNFNRS97

    If elected he’s out in 2012, What’s he going to do now?

  • GNFNRS97

    If elected he’s out in 2012, What’s he going to do now?

  • Andrew @ Intl Desk

    Digger, wow… narrow.

    I can tell you don’t read up much on the subject, but I guess I’ll respond because I’ve got nothing else to do right now. Part of your statement is true – producers are artificially limiting their supply, but only to extend their profitability before supplies run out and new opportunities arise (see my way-too-long comment above). Look up ‘Khurais’ or ‘Manifa’ – they’re the reserve fields that the Saudis have just tapped to maintain their own supplies. Growing domestic production of petrochemicals, an oil-thirsty industry in Saudi Arabia, has lowered even their exports for sale. On that note, the “governments and politicians” you refer to only account for the royal families in the Middle East who have controlling interests in their national oil companies. While they’re major players, the oil market is far greater than that.

    There is a limit to the supply. Even with booming consumption by the US, China, India and Brazil, I don’t believe we’ll run out of oil for at least 50 years, but the supply is draining. It’s not the supply itself people are worried about, though. It’s the downward slope after the peak. If alternatives aren’t found, we’ll ride it to the bottom, fast and hard. It’ll be 50 bucks a gallon and we’ll be hoarding it like an army of Mad Max extras. We’ll have to move on eventually.

    The gas shortages of the late 70s were political and fake. There’s nothing fake about this — production plateaued in late 2005, 2.5 years ago. The Department of Energy has statistics on it, whether you believe them or not is up to you.

  • Hayden

    Gah, I hope Obama soon realizes that biofuels are stupid. This 18-year plan crap is not going to help anything. We need a JFK-style 10 year ultimatum – complete oil independence by 2018. We need serious investment in large-scale solar and electric vehicles.

    Still better than McCain.

  • Hayden

    Gah, I hope Obama soon realizes that biofuels are stupid. This 18-year plan crap is not going to help anything. We need a JFK-style 10 year ultimatum – complete oil independence by 2018. We need serious investment in large-scale solar and electric vehicles.

    Still better than McCain.

  • Andrew @ Intl Desk

    Let the market sort it out:

    Let’s try to focus this on one problem: fueling the transportation of goods and people, over shipping lines, railways, trucks and commuter vehicles. We need cheap fuel so we can afford to drive to work, and can afford the goods we buy. Duh.

    Obviously, we’re not going to put nuclear reactors in our cars and trucks, so let’s set that aside for now.

    We’ve all pretty much figured out that ethanol is unsustainable in a global market. There just isn’t enough arable land on Earth to host both our energy and food supplies for 6 billion people, even if we push crop engineering to its limits to get the highest of yields. We’re already straining our fresh water supplies. The global food shortage isn’t due entirely (or even mostly) to growing ethanol-producing crops instead of food — droughts in southeast Asia and Australia have played a major factor — but let’s not digress.

    Bio-engineering firms like Synthetic Genomics and Amyris Biotech are experimenting with ways to produce fuel from animal waste. Amyris, for example, is engineering bugs that produce jet fuel. Great, sounds cool and renewable, but that technology is 10 years away. The good news is that we can use existing infrastructures to transport, store and distribute such fuels if they ever become profitable to manufacture.

    Hydrogen cars are already in the market. The Honda Clarity is available for lease in the Santa Monica area, where hydrogen fuel pumps have already been added to a few Shell stations. GM and the Department of Energy are conducting tests of how to expand on that. Current research suggests producing and storing hydrogen is way more expensive, and way less efficient than anyone previously thought, meaning oil companies and automakers won’t pursue it if it’s not profitable. Again, it’s a test case, and a decade away. But if you live in Santa Monica (and surrounding cities) and can afford a $600/month lease for a Honda, try it out. The car’s pretty slick looking, if you like sci-fi movie props.

    The conclusion: look at the Department of Energy’s statistics on global oil production for the past 20 years. We’ve plateaued. We are at peak oil right now. The supply of oil will never increase significantly again. The price of gas is rising because OPEC’s members need to extend that supply for as many years as possible to: 1) stay in business, 2) collect the funds to find new fields (which are multi-billion-dollar operations), and 3) research alternatives for the long term. Of course, the oil money goes elsewhere. Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum also thinks he needs a few hundred more skyscrapers in his little economic zone project called Dubai, for some reason — when I went there in 2005 half the hotel rooms and condo buildings were empty — but again, I digress.

    We’re going to be paying higher prices for at least another decade. Cheap oil for America is over — remember that Europe has been suffering prices far higher than $4/gallon for a long time. They’ve survived, albeit with a lot of economic assistance from us over the past 70 years. A new infrastructure — whether it’s biofuel, hydrogen or another miracle as plentiful and accessible as oil — will take at least a decade to develop and become profitable. But humanity’s progress in technology accelerates exponentially, so you may be driving a fairy-dust-powered car to the grocery store before you know it.

    Transport is the largest infrastructure in the world and won’t change overnight, so what we need is patience and incentives for research. As a libertarian, I believe the market will figure it out for itself. Believe it or not, you can trust the automakers and oil companies to find a new solution and implement it on a global scale. They may delay as long as possible, but they know better than we do how long the supply will last, and they want to stay in business for decades to come. They have to prove their viability to their investors, shareholders, etc. in the long term to maintain their value, and of course, stay stinking, filthy rich. Trust that they will do just that. The unfortunate part is that this shift from an oil-based economy to a renewables-based economy will be the most expensive transition in history, because its funding will come straight from our (the middle class) pockets. If you can’t wait that long, I suggest you go back to school, get a PhD in bioengineering or something, and get to work. Meanwhile, I’ll be living closer to work, avoiding driving, and eagerly awaiting your answers.

    Trust the market, and the answers will come. The President of the United States, whoever he will be, will have a lot less power in this issue than most think. And I’d personally like to keep it that way. To put so much faith and power in a single federal representative is both dangerous and a philosophical violation of the Constitution — but again, I digress. Trust the market, not your emperor or king.

  • Daniel

    Yeah sounds like a great idea to me. Let’s put starving guy’s rice into a fuel tank of an ultra-efficient hybrid. Brilliant!

  • Daniel

    Yeah sounds like a great idea to me. Let’s put starving guy’s rice into a fuel tank of an ultra-efficient hybrid. Brilliant!

  • http://blog.kevitivity.com Kevitivity

    This only goes to show how poor Obama is on this issue. We need to start drilling – yesterday. Also, why no nuclear? And ethanol is a disaster. I really don’t understand what people see in this guy. Hi gives good speeches as long as he has a teleprompter, but his politics are down right scare – the guys an out of touch radical.

  • http://blog.kevitivity.com Kevitivity

    This only goes to show how poor Obama is on this issue. We need to start drilling – yesterday. Also, why no nuclear? And ethanol is a disaster. I really don’t understand what people see in this guy. Hi gives good speeches as long as he has a teleprompter, but his politics are down right scare – the guys an out of touch radical.

  • Paul

    Karl wrote “yeah, because nothing can go wrong with using FOOD as fuel. NOTHING, im sure the laws of supply and demand wont cause food prices to sky rocket while millions starve to death. great plan there.”

    Karl is ignorant of what cellulosic ethanol is made from. It’s not food. Cellulosic ethanol is made from mostly inedible plant parts like corn stover, switchgrass, miscanthus and woodchips. Y’know, the leftover stuff that some farmers burn and others turn into mulch.

    Example from Wikipedia: Switchgrass is often considered a good candidate for biofuel — especially ethanol fuel — production due to its hardiness against poor soil and climate conditions, rapid growth and low fertilization and herbicide requirements. Switchgrass is also perennial, unlike corn, and has a huge biomass output, the raw plant material used to make biofuel, of 6-10 tons per acre.

    Switchgrass has the potential to produce the biomass required for production of up to 100 gallons (380 liters) of ethanol per metric ton. This gives switchgrass the potential to produce 1000 gallons of ethanol per acre, compared to 665 gallons for sugarcane and 400 gallons for corn.

    Switchgrass, which uses C4 carbon fixation, tolerates heat and drought conditions and requires far less water, whereas most plants use C3 carbon fixation, and 97% of water taken up is lost to the atmosphere. Also, even though C4-type plants make up only 5% of the Earth’s biomass, they account for 30% of carbon fixation from the atmosphere.

    But honestly, Karl, I doubt knowing the truth of Obama’s wisdom here now would change your views of Obama anyway. You’re just grasping for straws.

  • Paul

    Karl wrote “yeah, because nothing can go wrong with using FOOD as fuel. NOTHING, im sure the laws of supply and demand wont cause food prices to sky rocket while millions starve to death. great plan there.”

    Karl is ignorant of what cellulosic ethanol is made from. It’s not food. Cellulosic ethanol is made from mostly inedible plant parts like corn stover, switchgrass, miscanthus and woodchips. Y’know, the leftover stuff that some farmers burn and others turn into mulch.

    Example from Wikipedia: Switchgrass is often considered a good candidate for biofuel — especially ethanol fuel — production due to its hardiness against poor soil and climate conditions, rapid growth and low fertilization and herbicide requirements. Switchgrass is also perennial, unlike corn, and has a huge biomass output, the raw plant material used to make biofuel, of 6-10 tons per acre.

    Switchgrass has the potential to produce the biomass required for production of up to 100 gallons (380 liters) of ethanol per metric ton. This gives switchgrass the potential to produce 1000 gallons of ethanol per acre, compared to 665 gallons for sugarcane and 400 gallons for corn.

    Switchgrass, which uses C4 carbon fixation, tolerates heat and drought conditions and requires far less water, whereas most plants use C3 carbon fixation, and 97% of water taken up is lost to the atmosphere. Also, even though C4-type plants make up only 5% of the Earth’s biomass, they account for 30% of carbon fixation from the atmosphere.

    But honestly, Karl, I doubt knowing the truth of Obama’s wisdom here now would change your views of Obama anyway. You’re just grasping for straws.

  • john

    You know, I actually need a large vehicle. I get angry when people just stereotype that we they see me in an SUV. It’s a humble SUV mind you, a basic Honda, but sometimes I have to do work that requires me to move things around that don’t fit in my car (Which I drive most of the time).

    Now that said, here’s the kicker: I live less than a mile from where I work. About the same to most shopping. I walk or bike to work relatively often. And yet, I get things like “Gas Hog” written on my SUV’s windshield. People, I could drive a TANK to work and have a smaller carbon footprint than most people. My “gas hog” needs to be filled up about once a month, at best. Why? Because a few years ago I made the realization that suburban lifestyles are the real “hogs.” If you want to show real change, live in the country and be more self sufficient, or live near work/shopping/community, it’s FAR more efficient than living 20 miles from work, I don’t care what you drive. Stop judging what others drive, and start evaluating how you live.

  • john

    You know, I actually need a large vehicle. I get angry when people just stereotype that we they see me in an SUV. It’s a humble SUV mind you, a basic Honda, but sometimes I have to do work that requires me to move things around that don’t fit in my car (Which I drive most of the time).

    Now that said, here’s the kicker: I live less than a mile from where I work. About the same to most shopping. I walk or bike to work relatively often. And yet, I get things like “Gas Hog” written on my SUV’s windshield. People, I could drive a TANK to work and have a smaller carbon footprint than most people. My “gas hog” needs to be filled up about once a month, at best. Why? Because a few years ago I made the realization that suburban lifestyles are the real “hogs.” If you want to show real change, live in the country and be more self sufficient, or live near work/shopping/community, it’s FAR more efficient than living 20 miles from work, I don’t care what you drive. Stop judging what others drive, and start evaluating how you live.

  • Teh_environmentalist

    I have read articles suggesting, that genetically modified algae will be a highly effective source of biofuel. You simply contain the algae in a reservoir, and it grows so fast that you can harvest it every week.

    I’M NOT SAYING that this is the solution the the oil prises and energy crisis. But I don’t feel that biofuel made out of food is the right way to go. Just now millions of people are starving because of the record high food prices (which are partly due to the production of biofuel. 20% of the USA’s corn production was used to create biofuel opposed to feed ppl in Mexico.) It’s not fair, that people need to starve just so we can drive around in fuel-inefficient cars.

    Mind you, I do like Obama’s plan to increase fuel efficiency.

    AND LETS NOT FORGET RENEWABLE ENERGY (which I’m sure is the way to go.

    Innovations like this:

    http://www.dailytech.com/New+System+Shows+Customers+Solar+Savings+Using+Satellite+Images/article11550.htm

    … makes solar power a lot more cheep. With the increasing electricity prices, people who live in sunny regions in the US can save money by installing solar panels of their roofs. Most manufactures give the solar cells a 25 year guaranty, and you also get rid of the electricity transmission loss (about 7%).

    If private people were able to acquire cheep government loans, it would be plausible for many more people to replace some or all of their electricity demand by solar power.

  • Teh_environmentalist

    I have read articles suggesting, that genetically modified algae will be a highly effective source of biofuel. You simply contain the algae in a reservoir, and it grows so fast that you can harvest it every week.

    I’M NOT SAYING that this is the solution the the oil prises and energy crisis. But I don’t feel that biofuel made out of food is the right way to go. Just now millions of people are starving because of the record high food prices (which are partly due to the production of biofuel. 20% of the USA’s corn production was used to create biofuel opposed to feed ppl in Mexico.) It’s not fair, that people need to starve just so we can drive around in fuel-inefficient cars.

    Mind you, I do like Obama’s plan to increase fuel efficiency.

    AND LETS NOT FORGET RENEWABLE ENERGY (which I’m sure is the way to go.

    Innovations like this:

    http://www.dailytech.com/New+System+Shows+Customers+Solar+Savings+Using+Satellite+Images/article11550.htm

    … makes solar power a lot more cheep. With the increasing electricity prices, people who live in sunny regions in the US can save money by installing solar panels of their roofs. Most manufactures give the solar cells a 25 year guaranty, and you also get rid of the electricity transmission loss (about 7%).

    If private people were able to acquire cheep government loans, it would be plausible for many more people to replace some or all of their electricity demand by solar power.

  • mark

    food? does cellulosic ethanol come from food? read up on it before you post, karl

    mark

  • mark

    food? does cellulosic ethanol come from food? read up on it before you post, karl

    mark

  • http://www.theleetgeeks.com 4four1ones

    Our government needs to put the KIBOSH on the oil companies and I hope someone drops a pair and gets that accomplished or we really will face armageddon…

    4four1ones

  • http://www.theleetgeeks.com 4four1ones

    Our government needs to put the KIBOSH on the oil companies and I hope someone drops a pair and gets that accomplished or we really will face armageddon…

    4four1ones

  • http://www.theleetgeeks.com 4four1ones

    Did anyone watch the congressional hearings with the big oil company execs? Anyone? If you did, were you listening? These large oil companies amassed 128 billion dollars in PROFITS…yes, PROFITS and were handed 107 billion dollars in TAX BREAKS. Anyone smell a rat? When the head of Exxon was questioned in regards to the amount of their portion of the profits – approx 40 billion, how much they were investing in renewable energy research, he answered 30 million of the 40 billion dollar profit was donated to fund that research….WTF!!!! I swear the government is run by the oil companies.

    4four1ones

  • http://www.theleetgeeks.com 4four1ones

    Did anyone watch the congressional hearings with the big oil company execs? Anyone? If you did, were you listening? These large oil companies amassed 128 billion dollars in PROFITS…yes, PROFITS and were handed 107 billion dollars in TAX BREAKS. Anyone smell a rat? When the head of Exxon was questioned in regards to the amount of their portion of the profits – approx 40 billion, how much they were investing in renewable energy research, he answered 30 million of the 40 billion dollar profit was donated to fund that research….WTF!!!! I swear the government is run by the oil companies.

    4four1ones

  • Digger

    US is starving for OIL because the US Congress has prohibited drilling / new refinerys. It’s an artificial ‘Peak Oil’ crisis. The earth is constantly producing oil. We will never consume more oil than the earth produces. Governments and politicians limit the amount of Crude available by articially controlling where and when drilling/refining can happen.

  • Digger

    US is starving for OIL because the US Congress has prohibited drilling / new refinerys. It’s an artificial ‘Peak Oil’ crisis. The earth is constantly producing oil. We will never consume more oil than the earth produces. Governments and politicians limit the amount of Crude available by articially controlling where and when drilling/refining can happen.

  • http://www.yayboo.com Don

    I love Obama, but he’s going to have to increase his energy goals:

    Two interesting people to follow on this topic:

    Michael Klare (outlines the magnitude of the problem)

    Amory Lovins (outlines the solutions)

    http://www.ted.com/index.php/talks/view/id/51

  • http://www.yayboo.com Don

    I love Obama, but he’s going to have to increase his energy goals:

    Two interesting people to follow on this topic:

    Michael Klare (outlines the magnitude of the problem)

    Amory Lovins (outlines the solutions)

    http://www.ted.com/index.php/talks/view/id/51

  • electic

    Who killed the electric car?

  • electic

    Who killed the electric car?

  • John

    Hey Pete,

    Before you jabber on more about not buying gas, you should spend your time learning about economics first.

    Because gas is such a need based item for our economy it is inelastic demand. Even not buying gas for a day wont help longterm gas prices when supply continues to decrease, maybe save you a penny at most.

    Karl is right.. using food is not a good idea.. thats why %^&*( chicken is expensive now….. have you seen the price for a gallon of milk too?

    and MeToo… i have a 6 cylinder car.. and my mom has a 8 cylinder lexus that get gets 23-28 miles a gallon depending on how you drive. I have a v6 02 maxima..i get 26 miles a gallon.. i would easily get 30+ if i had more than 4 gears. Although engine size is a large factor in mileage, i believe the way its tuned and your gears have a MUCH MORE significant impact.

    i want an Audi R8 next.. outlaw v8s!? that car is soo sexy and it gets decent mileage…. thats an unamerican statement … outlaw v8s!? vroooooom vrooom! you terrorist!

  • John

    Hey Pete,

    Before you jabber on more about not buying gas, you should spend your time learning about economics first.

    Because gas is such a need based item for our economy it is inelastic demand. Even not buying gas for a day wont help longterm gas prices when supply continues to decrease, maybe save you a penny at most.

    Karl is right.. using food is not a good idea.. thats why %^&*( chicken is expensive now….. have you seen the price for a gallon of milk too?

    and MeToo… i have a 6 cylinder car.. and my mom has a 8 cylinder lexus that get gets 23-28 miles a gallon depending on how you drive. I have a v6 02 maxima..i get 26 miles a gallon.. i would easily get 30+ if i had more than 4 gears. Although engine size is a large factor in mileage, i believe the way its tuned and your gears have a MUCH MORE significant impact.

    i want an Audi R8 next.. outlaw v8s!? that car is soo sexy and it gets decent mileage…. thats an unamerican statement … outlaw v8s!? vroooooom vrooom! you terrorist!

  • ChrisK

    Whoa…

    Obama also mentioned the need to expand mass transit infrastructure. Trains running on steel rails, using electric motors can be significantly more efficient at transporting either people and freight than rubber-wheeled vehicles.

    Obama actually understands that transit and smart growth go together and they’re part of a greener and less oil-dependent future.

  • pidgas

    That’s it? Seriously?

  • pidgas

    That’s it? Seriously?

  • Otis

    Hey Karl, cellulosic ethanol doesn’t have to come from corn or soybeans anymore. Straw and plant wastes can be used to create the same quality of fuel. Good times.

  • Otis

    Hey Karl, cellulosic ethanol doesn’t have to come from corn or soybeans anymore. Straw and plant wastes can be used to create the same quality of fuel. Good times.

  • Dustin

    Ok, I was listening to what the above post had to say, until the very end. I do not believe that this guy is a mathematician at all. If he were he would surely know that his whole method for reaching 300 million people is totally flawed. A little something called the birthday paradox applies to situations like this, and I don’t believe any mathematician worth listening to would forget about it long enough to propose such a plan.

  • Dustin

    Ok, I was listening to what the above post had to say, until the very end. I do not believe that this guy is a mathematician at all. If he were he would surely know that his whole method for reaching 300 million people is totally flawed. A little something called the birthday paradox applies to situations like this, and I don’t believe any mathematician worth listening to would forget about it long enough to propose such a plan.

  • http://www.evanhilldesign.com Evan

    I really expected more from Obama. At least he’s not advocating cutting the gas tax.

    I would like to see tax credits for people who can prove they cut their consumption (i.e. moved closer to work, took public transit or took their bikes).

    Also, what about a public (rather than private) sponsored X-prize challenge for the team who can do the most to improve fuel economy.

    Also, how about more grants/tax credits to people and municipalities that switch to more fuel efficient cars.

    Plus, let’s lead by example. Ground Air Force One and take the train across country more often. Hell, if Bush can take entire months off from the Presidency to go and hide in Crawford, Obama could run the country from a train car.

  • http://www.evanhilldesign.com Evan

    I really expected more from Obama. At least he’s not advocating cutting the gas tax.

    I would like to see tax credits for people who can prove they cut their consumption (i.e. moved closer to work, took public transit or took their bikes).

    Also, what about a public (rather than private) sponsored X-prize challenge for the team who can do the most to improve fuel economy.

    Also, how about more grants/tax credits to people and municipalities that switch to more fuel efficient cars.

    Plus, let’s lead by example. Ground Air Force One and take the train across country more often. Hell, if Bush can take entire months off from the Presidency to go and hide in Crawford, Obama could run the country from a train car.

  • UK citizen

    *laughs*

    Yes, four American dollars per 4.55L, how very expensive. Cry some more. Some of us are more used to two American dollars per litre. You know how much that is per gallon? Nine American dollars per gallon.

    Aww, you want it to cost two dollars? The mean oil companies are being nasty again?

  • UK citizen

    *laughs*

    Yes, four American dollars per 4.55L, how very expensive. Cry some more. Some of us are more used to two American dollars per litre. You know how much that is per gallon? Nine American dollars per gallon.

    Aww, you want it to cost two dollars? The mean oil companies are being nasty again?

  • Ben

    Ethanol is not a good alternative. We are talking about adding more and more alcohol to fuel. Brazil tried alcohol based fuels that and ended up with a country with destroyed engines. Alcohol is the solution to a problem that makes a bigger problem. Instead of alcohol we should be running something like acetone which not only promotes a complete combustion but also:

    Increases mileage by 15-30%

    Reduces emissions by HALF or MORE

    Due to a complete burn, fuel isn’t being pushed past the piston rings and dirtying the oil

    Only requires a mere 2-3ounces per 10 gallons of fuel (Gas and Diesel)

    CHEAP!

    Don’t be dumb America. We keep rushing to conclusions and start grabbing for the first alternative we find. Farking morons.

    http://www.pureenergysystems.com/news/2005/03/17/6900069_Acetone/

  • Ben

    Ethanol is not a good alternative. We are talking about adding more and more alcohol to fuel. Brazil tried alcohol based fuels that and ended up with a country with destroyed engines. Alcohol is the solution to a problem that makes a bigger problem. Instead of alcohol we should be running something like acetone which not only promotes a complete combustion but also:

    Increases mileage by 15-30%

    Reduces emissions by HALF or MORE

    Due to a complete burn, fuel isn’t being pushed past the piston rings and dirtying the oil

    Only requires a mere 2-3ounces per 10 gallons of fuel (Gas and Diesel)

    CHEAP!

    Don’t be dumb America. We keep rushing to conclusions and start grabbing for the first alternative we find. Farking morons.

    http://www.pureenergysystems.com/news/2005/03/17/6900069_Acetone/

  • Pete

    THIS IS NOT THE ‘DON’T BUY’ GAS FOR ONE DAY, BUT IT WILL SHOW YOU HOW WE CAN GET GAS BACK DOWN TO $1.30 PER GALLON.

    This was sent by a retired Coca Cola executive. It came from one of his engineer buddies who retired from Halliburton. If you are tired of the gas prices going up AND they will continue t o rise this summer, take time to read this please.

    Phillip Hollsworth offered this good idea.

    This makes MUCH MORE SENSE than the ‘don’t buy gas on a certain day’ campaign that was going around last April or May!

    It’s worth your consideration. Join the resistance!!!!

    I hear we are going to hit close to $ 4.00 a gallon by summer and it might go higher!! Want gasoline prices to come down?

    We need to take some intelligent, united action. The oil companies just laughed at that b ecause they knew we wouldn’t continue to ‘hurt’ ourselves by refusing to buy gas.

    It was more of an inconvenience to us than it was a problem for them.

    BUT, whoever thought of this idea, has come up with a plan that can Really work. Please read on and join with us!

    By now you’re probably thinking gasoline priced at about $2.00 is super cheap. Me too! It is currently $ 3.34 for regular unleaded in my town.

    Now that the oil companies and the OPEC nations have conditioned us to think that the cost of a gallon of gas is CHEAP at $1.50 – $1.75, we need to take aggressive action to teach them that BUYERS control the marketplace…not sellers.

    With the price of gasoline going up more each day, we consumers need to take action.

    The only way we are going to see the price of gas come down is if we hit someone in the pocketbook by not purchasing their gas! And, we can do that WITHOUT hurting ourselves.

    How? Since we all rely on our cars, we can’t just stop buying gas.

    But we CAN have an impact on gas prices if we all act together to force a price war.

    Here’s the idea: For the rest of this year, DON’T purchase ANY gasoline from the two biggest companies (which now are one), EXXON and MOBIL.

    If they are not selling any gas, they will be inclined to reduce their prices. If they reduce their prices, the other companies will have to follow suit.

    But to have an impact, we need to reach literally millions of Exxon and Mobil gas buyers. It’s really simple to do! Now, don’t wimp out on me at this point…keep reading and I’ll explain how simple it is to reach millions of people!!

    I am sending this note to 30 people. If each of us send it to at least ten more (30 x 10 = 300) .. and those 300 send it to at least ten more (300 x 10 = 3,000)…and so on, by the time the message r eaches the sixth group of people, we will have reached over THREE MILLION consumers.

    If those three million get excited and pass this on to ten friends each, then 30 million people will have been contacted!

    If it goes one level further, you guessed it….. THREE HUNDRED MILLION PEOPLE!!!

    Again, all you have to do is send this to 10 people. That’s all!

    (If you don’t understand how we can reach 300 million and all you have to do is send this to 10 people…. Well, let’s face it, you just aren’t a mathematician. But I am.so trust me on this one.

    How long would all that take? If each of us sends this e-mail out to ten more people within one day of receipt, all 300 MILLION people could conceivably be contacted within the next 8 days!!!

    I’ll bet you didn’t think you and I had that much potential, did you !

    Acting together we can make a difference.

    If this makes sense to you, please pass this message on. I suggest that we not buy from EXXON/MOBIL UNTIL THEY LOWER THEIR PRICES TO THE $2.00 RANGE AND KEEP THEM DOWN. THIS CAN REALLY WORK.

    Keep it going

  • Pete

    THIS IS NOT THE ‘DON’T BUY’ GAS FOR ONE DAY, BUT IT WILL SHOW YOU HOW WE CAN GET GAS BACK DOWN TO $1.30 PER GALLON.

    This was sent by a retired Coca Cola executive. It came from one of his engineer buddies who retired from Halliburton. If you are tired of the gas prices going up AND they will continue t o rise this summer, take time to read this please.

    Phillip Hollsworth offered this good idea.

    This makes MUCH MORE SENSE than the ‘don’t buy gas on a certain day’ campaign that was going around last April or May!

    It’s worth your consideration. Join the resistance!!!!

    I hear we are going to hit close to $ 4.00 a gallon by summer and it might go higher!! Want gasoline prices to come down?

    We need to take some intelligent, united action. The oil companies just laughed at that b ecause they knew we wouldn’t continue to ‘hurt’ ourselves by refusing to buy gas.

    It was more of an inconvenience to us than it was a problem for them.

    BUT, whoever thought of this idea, has come up with a plan that can Really work. Please read on and join with us!

    By now you’re probably thinking gasoline priced at about $2.00 is super cheap. Me too! It is currently $ 3.34 for regular unleaded in my town.

    Now that the oil companies and the OPEC nations have conditioned us to think that the cost of a gallon of gas is CHEAP at $1.50 – $1.75, we need to take aggressive action to teach them that BUYERS control the marketplace…not sellers.

    With the price of gasoline going up more each day, we consumers need to take action.

    The only way we are going to see the price of gas come down is if we hit someone in the pocketbook by not purchasing their gas! And, we can do that WITHOUT hurting ourselves.

    How? Since we all rely on our cars, we can’t just stop buying gas.

    But we CAN have an impact on gas prices if we all act together to force a price war.

    Here’s the idea: For the rest of this year, DON’T purchase ANY gasoline from the two biggest companies (which now are one), EXXON and MOBIL.

    If they are not selling any gas, they will be inclined to reduce their prices. If they reduce their prices, the other companies will have to follow suit.

    But to have an impact, we need to reach literally millions of Exxon and Mobil gas buyers. It’s really simple to do! Now, don’t wimp out on me at this point…keep reading and I’ll explain how simple it is to reach millions of people!!

    I am sending this note to 30 people. If each of us send it to at least ten more (30 x 10 = 300) .. and those 300 send it to at least ten more (300 x 10 = 3,000)…and so on, by the time the message r eaches the sixth group of people, we will have reached over THREE MILLION consumers.

    If those three million get excited and pass this on to ten friends each, then 30 million people will have been contacted!

    If it goes one level further, you guessed it….. THREE HUNDRED MILLION PEOPLE!!!

    Again, all you have to do is send this to 10 people. That’s all!

    (If you don’t understand how we can reach 300 million and all you have to do is send this to 10 people…. Well, let’s face it, you just aren’t a mathematician. But I am.so trust me on this one.

    How long would all that take? If each of us sends this e-mail out to ten more people within one day of receipt, all 300 MILLION people could conceivably be contacted within the next 8 days!!!

    I’ll bet you didn’t think you and I had that much potential, did you !

    Acting together we can make a difference.

    If this makes sense to you, please pass this message on. I suggest that we not buy from EXXON/MOBIL UNTIL THEY LOWER THEIR PRICES TO THE $2.00 RANGE AND KEEP THEM DOWN. THIS CAN REALLY WORK.

    Keep it going

  • Sebastian

    Light on policy eh?

  • Sebastian

    Light on policy eh?

  • Andrew @ Intl Desk

    Digger, wow… narrow.

    I can tell you don’t read up much on the subject, but I guess I’ll respond because I’ve got nothing else to do right now. Part of your statement is true – producers are artificially limiting their supply, but only to extend their profitability before supplies run out and new opportunities arise (see my way-too-long comment above). Look up ‘Khurais’ or ‘Manifa’ – they’re the reserve fields that the Saudis have just tapped to maintain their own supplies. Growing domestic production of petrochemicals, an oil-thirsty industry in Saudi Arabia, has lowered even their exports for sale. On that note, the “governments and politicians” you refer to only account for the royal families in the Middle East who have controlling interests in their national oil companies. While they’re major players, the oil market is far greater than that.

    There is a limit to the supply. Even with booming consumption by the US, China, India and Brazil, I don’t believe we’ll run out of oil for at least 50 years, but the supply is draining. It’s not the supply itself people are worried about, though. It’s the downward slope after the peak. If alternatives aren’t found, we’ll ride it to the bottom, fast and hard. It’ll be 50 bucks a gallon and we’ll be hoarding it like an army of Mad Max extras. We’ll have to move on eventually.

    The gas shortages of the late 70s were political and fake. There’s nothing fake about this — production plateaued in late 2005, 2.5 years ago. The Department of Energy has statistics on it, whether you believe them or not is up to you.

  • Ault Sager

    …to be generated from clean, renewable sources including wind, solar and geothermal…

    Actually, none of those are “renewable” sources. And the last — geothermal — it the most unreliable of them all. One good earthquake and the source dries up.

  • Ault Sager

    …to be generated from clean, renewable sources including wind, solar and geothermal…

    Actually, none of those are “renewable” sources. And the last — geothermal — it the most unreliable of them all. One good earthquake and the source dries up.

  • arter2

    this is far too little and will take way too long we need to drastically change our need for foreign oil and to do this we should start investing immediately. With tax incentives as well as high required renewable energy amounts per state.

  • arter2

    this is far too little and will take way too long we need to drastically change our need for foreign oil and to do this we should start investing immediately. With tax incentives as well as high required renewable energy amounts per state.

  • Andrew @ Intl Desk

    Let the market sort it out:

    Let’s try to focus this on one problem: fueling the transportation of goods and people, over shipping lines, railways, trucks and commuter vehicles. We need cheap fuel so we can afford to drive to work, and can afford the goods we buy. Duh.

    Obviously, we’re not going to put nuclear reactors in our cars and trucks, so let’s set that aside for now.

    We’ve all pretty much figured out that ethanol is unsustainable in a global market. There just isn’t enough arable land on Earth to host both our energy and food supplies for 6 billion people, even if we push crop engineering to its limits to get the highest of yields. We’re already straining our fresh water supplies. The global food shortage isn’t due entirely (or even mostly) to growing ethanol-producing crops instead of food — droughts in southeast Asia and Australia have played a major factor — but let’s not digress.

    Bio-engineering firms like Synthetic Genomics and Amyris Biotech are experimenting with ways to produce fuel from animal waste. Amyris, for example, is engineering bugs that produce jet fuel. Great, sounds cool and renewable, but that technology is 10 years away. The good news is that we can use existing infrastructures to transport, store and distribute such fuels if they ever become profitable to manufacture.

    Hydrogen cars are already in the market. The Honda Clarity is available for lease in the Santa Monica area, where hydrogen fuel pumps have already been added to a few Shell stations. GM and the Department of Energy are conducting tests of how to expand on that. Current research suggests producing and storing hydrogen is way more expensive, and way less efficient than anyone previously thought, meaning oil companies and automakers won’t pursue it if it’s not profitable. Again, it’s a test case, and a decade away. But if you live in Santa Monica (and surrounding cities) and can afford a $600/month lease for a Honda, try it out. The car’s pretty slick looking, if you like sci-fi movie props.

    The conclusion: look at the Department of Energy’s statistics on global oil production for the past 20 years. We’ve plateaued. We are at peak oil right now. The supply of oil will never increase significantly again. The price of gas is rising because OPEC’s members need to extend that supply for as many years as possible to: 1) stay in business, 2) collect the funds to find new fields (which are multi-billion-dollar operations), and 3) research alternatives for the long term. Of course, the oil money goes elsewhere. Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum also thinks he needs a few hundred more skyscrapers in his little economic zone project called Dubai, for some reason — when I went there in 2005 half the hotel rooms and condo buildings were empty — but again, I digress.

    We’re going to be paying higher prices for at least another decade. Cheap oil for America is over — remember that Europe has been suffering prices far higher than $4/gallon for a long time. They’ve survived, albeit with a lot of economic assistance from us over the past 70 years. A new infrastructure — whether it’s biofuel, hydrogen or another miracle as plentiful and accessible as oil — will take at least a decade to develop and become profitable. But humanity’s progress in technology accelerates exponentially, so you may be driving a fairy-dust-powered car to the grocery store before you know it.

    Transport is the largest infrastructure in the world and won’t change overnight, so what we need is patience and incentives for research. As a libertarian, I believe the market will figure it out for itself. Believe it or not, you can trust the automakers and oil companies to find a new solution and implement it on a global scale. They may delay as long as possible, but they know better than we do how long the supply will last, and they want to stay in business for decades to come. They have to prove their viability to their investors, shareholders, etc. in the long term to maintain their value, and of course, stay stinking, filthy rich. Trust that they will do just that. The unfortunate part is that this shift from an oil-based economy to a renewables-based economy will be the most expensive transition in history, because its funding will come straight from our (the middle class) pockets. If you can’t wait that long, I suggest you go back to school, get a PhD in bioengineering or something, and get to work. Meanwhile, I’ll be living closer to work, avoiding driving, and eagerly awaiting your answers.

    Trust the market, and the answers will come. The President of the United States, whoever he will be, will have a lot less power in this issue than most think. And I’d personally like to keep it that way. To put so much faith and power in a single federal representative is both dangerous and a philosophical violation of the Constitution — but again, I digress. Trust the market, not your emperor or king.

  • http://thegoreyears.wordpress.com The Gore Years

    Is there any way we can just sort of sneak him in before Bush’s term is over?

  • http://thegoreyears.wordpress.com The Gore Years

    Is there any way we can just sort of sneak him in before Bush’s term is over?

  • Necoras

    More rhetoric. No nuclear power rollout, no space based power. Those are the only real large quantity power sources that we have access to TODAY. Next gen biofuels are great, but we don’t have the technology.

  • Necoras

    More rhetoric. No nuclear power rollout, no space based power. Those are the only real large quantity power sources that we have access to TODAY. Next gen biofuels are great, but we don’t have the technology.

  • MeToo

    Two very simple paths to reducing overall fuel consumption:

    1) Reduce the number of SUVs on the road

    2) Reduce the number or 6-cylinder and 8-cylinder cars on the road.

    For the first, make all vehicles of that classification require a truck driver’s license. That way, those few who have a genuine need for them will still be able to use them, while those who *don’t* need them but still insist on driving them will be better trained in how to handle them (reversing cameras my ass!).

    For the second, just outlaw the damn things – there’s no excuse for them.

  • MeToo

    Two very simple paths to reducing overall fuel consumption:

    1) Reduce the number of SUVs on the road

    2) Reduce the number or 6-cylinder and 8-cylinder cars on the road.

    For the first, make all vehicles of that classification require a truck driver’s license. That way, those few who have a genuine need for them will still be able to use them, while those who *don’t* need them but still insist on driving them will be better trained in how to handle them (reversing cameras my ass!).

    For the second, just outlaw the damn things – there’s no excuse for them.

  • http://www.news.com Mia Wandizbig

    Simple, buy oil from Venezuela and quit worrying about the damn Saudi’s

  • http://www.news.com Mia Wandizbig

    Simple, buy oil from Venezuela and quit worrying about the damn Saudi’s

  • karl

    yeah, because nothing can go wrong with using FOOD as fuel. NOTHING, im sure the laws of supply and demand wont cause food prices to sky rocket while millions starve to death. great plan there.

    as for fuel efficient cars, 20 years?!?! only 30%+ of the worlds totoal fuel supplies will be gone by then, and we will have already hit the fuel peak 10-15 years before that, so thats like saying ‘watter the plant after it dies’.

    and the latter, well thats also a bit too little too late. america and the world needs something a bit more progressive than that trite rhetoric that has been passed around by every new candidate and their grandmas.

  • karl

    yeah, because nothing can go wrong with using FOOD as fuel. NOTHING, im sure the laws of supply and demand wont cause food prices to sky rocket while millions starve to death. great plan there.

    as for fuel efficient cars, 20 years?!?! only 30%+ of the worlds totoal fuel supplies will be gone by then, and we will have already hit the fuel peak 10-15 years before that, so thats like saying ‘watter the plant after it dies’.

    and the latter, well thats also a bit too little too late. america and the world needs something a bit more progressive than that trite rhetoric that has been passed around by every new candidate and their grandmas.

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