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Clean Power loess hill wind farm

Published on May 5th, 2008 | by Sarah Lozanova

59

First Wind Powered City

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May 5th, 2008 by
 

loess hill wind farmRock Port, Missouri is the first 100% wind powered city in the US. Loess Hill Wind Farm, with four 1.25 MW wind turbines is estimated to generate 16 gigawatt hours (16 million kilowatt hours) of electricity annually. 13 gigawatts hours of electricity have historically been consumed annually by the residents and businesses of this town of 1,400 people.

The local electric company, Missouri Public Utility Alliance, will purchase excess electricity when available. They will then supply power when there is not enough wind energy available. Excess wind energy will not be stored but rather fed into the city’s high voltage line, making it an intermittent source of power.

Several factors made this smaller scale project possible. The city has a bluff within the city limits with good resources, John Deere’s Wind Energy financing the project, and proximity to the power grid.

Sarah Lozanova is a freelance writer that is passionate about the new green economy and is a regular contributor to environmental and energy publications and websites, including Energy International Quarterly, ThinkGreen.com, Triple Pundit, Green Business Quarterly, Renewable Energy World, and Green Business Quarterly. Her experience includes work with small-scale solar energy installations and utility-scale wind farms. She earned an MBA in sustainable management from the Presidio Graduate School and is a co-founder of Trees Across the Miles, an urban reforestation initiative.

Related Posts on Renewable Energy:

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The Unlimited Potential of American Wind Power: AWEA

Planetthoughts: First Town in the US to be 100% Wind Powered

Offshore Wind: How Europe Plans to Meet Clean Energy Goals

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About the Author

is passionate about the new green economy and renewable energy. Sarah's experience includes work with small-scale solar energy installations and utility-scale wind farms. She earned an MBA in sustainable management from the Presidio Graduate School and is a co-founder of Trees Across the Miles, an urban reforestation initiative. When she can escape the internet vortex, she enjoys playing in the forest, paddling down rivers, or twisting into yoga poses.



  • http://www.hemendinlesene.com mp3 dinle

    Actually most of Denmark’s energy is produced from Coal power.a

  • http://www.hemendinlesene.com mp3 dinle

    Actually most of Denmark’s energy is produced from Coal power.a

  • Drew

    The town is not supplied 100% by wind. If the wind does not blow the real power company kicks in. That power could be dirty fossil fuels or a river that has a big dam.

  • Drew

    The town is not supplied 100% by wind. If the wind does not blow the real power company kicks in. That power could be dirty fossil fuels or a river that has a big dam.

  • Drew

    The town is not supplied 100% by wind. If the wind does not blow the real power company kicks in. That power could be dirty fossil fuels or a river that has a big dam.

  • Pingback: President George Bush: 'Goodbye from the world's biggest polluter' - Page 12 - Debate Politics Forums

  • http://www.earthcollege.org Earth College

    There are many solutions to our global problem. Wind power is one, cow power is another. There are cars which run on electric batteries only and alternatives are all around us. With many people becoming desperate with the cost of fuel rising to ridiculous rates, they are now even signing a petition to drill for Oil in America, ANYWHERE. Please note this story as well and join in our discussion about creating a counter petition. It is located at http://www.care2.com/news/member/469277529/774632.

    WE need to implement all energy solutions as quickly as possible or we will see continued pollution and destruction world wide for the pursuit of oil.

    Peace, Love and Light,

    Lyra

    Co-founder of http://www.EarthCollege.org

  • http://www.earthcollege.org Earth College

    There are many solutions to our global problem. Wind power is one, cow power is another. There are cars which run on electric batteries only and alternatives are all around us. With many people becoming desperate with the cost of fuel rising to ridiculous rates, they are now even signing a petition to drill for Oil in America, ANYWHERE. Please note this story as well and join in our discussion about creating a counter petition. It is located at http://www.care2.com/news/member/469277529/774632.

    WE need to implement all energy solutions as quickly as possible or we will see continued pollution and destruction world wide for the pursuit of oil.

    Peace, Love and Light,

    Lyra

    Co-founder of http://www.EarthCollege.org

  • http://www.earthcollege.org Earth College

    There are many solutions to our global problem. Wind power is one, cow power is another. There are cars which run on electric batteries only and alternatives are all around us. With many people becoming desperate with the cost of fuel rising to ridiculous rates, they are now even signing a petition to drill for Oil in America, ANYWHERE. Please note this story as well and join in our discussion about creating a counter petition. It is located at http://www.care2.com/news/member/469277529/774632.

    WE need to implement all energy solutions as quickly as possible or we will see continued pollution and destruction world wide for the pursuit of oil.

    Peace, Love and Light,

    Lyra

    Co-founder of http://www.EarthCollege.org

  • Mark M.

    I think wind power and solar power are our future. We will not be able to get rid of coal and crude oil altogether, but we can use green power to help it out. I built my own solar water heater panel. I live in southwest Louisiana. On sunny days I get all of my hot water from solar. It truely works.

  • Mark M.

    I think wind power and solar power are our future. We will not be able to get rid of coal and crude oil altogether, but we can use green power to help it out. I built my own solar water heater panel. I live in southwest Louisiana. On sunny days I get all of my hot water from solar. It truely works.

  • Mark M.

    I think wind power and solar power are our future. We will not be able to get rid of coal and crude oil altogether, but we can use green power to help it out. I built my own solar water heater panel. I live in southwest Louisiana. On sunny days I get all of my hot water from solar. It truely works.

  • mark

    I am very pleased to hear such a story. We need more of this. It is time for people to be rethinking the way they live, being more conservative, less wasteful and rethinking the whole ecomonic picture. I believe we don’t have a choice but pursue this direction. I am strongly encouraging our smaller school districts to think about utilizing these types of resources to help offset some costs especially when upgrading/remodeling their facilities.

  • mark

    I am very pleased to hear such a story. We need more of this. It is time for people to be rethinking the way they live, being more conservative, less wasteful and rethinking the whole ecomonic picture. I believe we don’t have a choice but pursue this direction. I am strongly encouraging our smaller school districts to think about utilizing these types of resources to help offset some costs especially when upgrading/remodeling their facilities.

  • mark

    I am very pleased to hear such a story. We need more of this. It is time for people to be rethinking the way they live, being more conservative, less wasteful and rethinking the whole ecomonic picture. I believe we don’t have a choice but pursue this direction. I am strongly encouraging our smaller school districts to think about utilizing these types of resources to help offset some costs especially when upgrading/remodeling their facilities.

  • Sarah Lozanova

    The California wind farm that the article refers to has been a nightmare for birds. As one of the first large-scale wind farms, a lot has been learned from it and changed since then.

    Two of the big problems with that installation were the speed of the tip of the turbines and the fact that it is a huge corridor for migratory birds.

    Wind developers now have to prove that the farm won’t have this kind of effect on birds to obtain permits and turbine blades are much larger now, therefore moving slower.

    The developers of the GSG Wind Farm in Illinois say that each turbine kills about 1 to 2 birds a year. How many birds does climate change kill?

  • http://www.thearticlewriter.com/blog Matt Keegan

    Not so fast — wind turbines kill birds:

    http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2005-01-04-windmills-usat_x.htm

    Please, I don’t want to hear the argument that cats kill more birds either.

  • http://www.thearticlewriter.com/blog Matt Keegan

    Not so fast — wind turbines kill birds:

    http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2005-01-04-windmills-usat_x.htm

    Please, I don’t want to hear the argument that cats kill more birds either.

  • http://www.thearticlewriter.com/blog Matt Keegan

    Not so fast — wind turbines kill birds:

    http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2005-01-04-windmills-usat_x.htm

    Please, I don’t want to hear the argument that cats kill more birds either.

  • http://www.water4gas-scam.com Chuck

    Simply amazing. You know these methods should be especially introduced to countries from the developing world. I saw on this website that there are whole villages powered by hydrogen in Japan and Denmark. Apparently hydrogen can be used to run cars too, infact according to this website http://www..water4gas-scam.com Iceland’s buses already run on hydrogen and now we can convert our cars to run on hydrogen for a minimal cost. This would really help the world go green I guess

  • http://www.water4gas-scam.com Chuck

    Simply amazing. You know these methods should be especially introduced to countries from the developing world. I saw on this website that there are whole villages powered by hydrogen in Japan and Denmark. Apparently hydrogen can be used to run cars too, infact according to this website http://www..water4gas-scam.com Iceland’s buses already run on hydrogen and now we can convert our cars to run on hydrogen for a minimal cost. This would really help the world go green I guess

  • http://www.water4gas-scam.com Chuck

    Simply amazing. You know these methods should be especially introduced to countries from the developing world. I saw on this website that there are whole villages powered by hydrogen in Japan and Denmark. Apparently hydrogen can be used to run cars too, infact according to this website http://www..water4gas-scam.com Iceland’s buses already run on hydrogen and now we can convert our cars to run on hydrogen for a minimal cost. This would really help the world go green I guess

  • http://www.water4gas-scam.com Chuck

    Simply amazing. You know these methods should be especially introduced to countries from the developing world. I saw on this website that there are whole villages powered by hydrogen in Japan and Denmark. Apparently hydrogen can be used to run cars too, infact according to this website http://www..water4gas-scam.com Iceland’s buses already run on hydrogen and now we can convert our cars to run on hydrogen for a minimal cost. This would really help the world go green I guess

  • http://cheatbuzz.com/ MajorJJH

    Now that’s awesome, even though the government’s aren’t doing anything, the small communities, cities and states are at least stepping up to the plate!

  • http://cheatbuzz.com/ MajorJJH

    Now that’s awesome, even though the government’s aren’t doing anything, the small communities, cities and states are at least stepping up to the plate!

  • Brian

    I think the comment by “yo bro” was sarcastic. If it wasn’t sarcastic then that makes it downright funny.

    There is a vocal minority who oppose wind power, but rarely are they so brazen as to come out and give their real selfish reasons for opposing wind- which virtually always comes down to the view.

    I am pleased to hear so much positive commentary, usually those in favor of wind power take for granted that it is a universal positive, and see no need to stand up and say something in support.

  • Brian

    I think the comment by “yo bro” was sarcastic. If it wasn’t sarcastic then that makes it downright funny.

    There is a vocal minority who oppose wind power, but rarely are they so brazen as to come out and give their real selfish reasons for opposing wind- which virtually always comes down to the view.

    I am pleased to hear so much positive commentary, usually those in favor of wind power take for granted that it is a universal positive, and see no need to stand up and say something in support.

  • Brian

    I think the comment by “yo bro” was sarcastic. If it wasn’t sarcastic then that makes it downright funny.

    There is a vocal minority who oppose wind power, but rarely are they so brazen as to come out and give their real selfish reasons for opposing wind- which virtually always comes down to the view.

    I am pleased to hear so much positive commentary, usually those in favor of wind power take for granted that it is a universal positive, and see no need to stand up and say something in support.

  • Brian

    I think the comment by “yo bro” was sarcastic. If it wasn’t sarcastic then that makes it downright funny.

    There is a vocal minority who oppose wind power, but rarely are they so brazen as to come out and give their real selfish reasons for opposing wind- which virtually always comes down to the view.

    I am pleased to hear so much positive commentary, usually those in favor of wind power take for granted that it is a universal positive, and see no need to stand up and say something in support.

  • http://eatdrinkbetter.com bethb

    That’s funny. My grandparents were from there, this tiny town no one had heard of.

  • http://eatdrinkbetter.com bethb

    That’s funny. My grandparents were from there, this tiny town no one had heard of.

  • http://eatdrinkbetter.com bethb

    That’s funny. My grandparents were from there, this tiny town no one had heard of.

  • http://eatdrinkbetter.com bethb

    That’s funny. My grandparents were from there, this tiny town no one had heard of.

  • Megan

    yo bro . . . what can I say; people like you are very frustrating. Are you going to unplug your computer and live off the grid entirely? If not, someone somewhere is going to have to have some kind of power generation equipment in their back yard. Would you rather have the exhaust from a coal stack, the cooling towers of a nuclear power plant, or the beautiful serenity of wind mills. Your choice any of these, or get off the grid. I don’t see wind turbines as destructive of “eco-views” I see them as beautiful sustainable energy in motion.

  • Megan

    yo bro . . . what can I say; people like you are very frustrating. Are you going to unplug your computer and live off the grid entirely? If not, someone somewhere is going to have to have some kind of power generation equipment in their back yard. Would you rather have the exhaust from a coal stack, the cooling towers of a nuclear power plant, or the beautiful serenity of wind mills. Your choice any of these, or get off the grid. I don’t see wind turbines as destructive of “eco-views” I see them as beautiful sustainable energy in motion.

  • Megan

    yo bro . . . what can I say; people like you are very frustrating. Are you going to unplug your computer and live off the grid entirely? If not, someone somewhere is going to have to have some kind of power generation equipment in their back yard. Would you rather have the exhaust from a coal stack, the cooling towers of a nuclear power plant, or the beautiful serenity of wind mills. Your choice any of these, or get off the grid. I don’t see wind turbines as destructive of “eco-views” I see them as beautiful sustainable energy in motion.

  • Megan

    yo bro . . . what can I say; people like you are very frustrating. Are you going to unplug your computer and live off the grid entirely? If not, someone somewhere is going to have to have some kind of power generation equipment in their back yard. Would you rather have the exhaust from a coal stack, the cooling towers of a nuclear power plant, or the beautiful serenity of wind mills. Your choice any of these, or get off the grid. I don’t see wind turbines as destructive of “eco-views” I see them as beautiful sustainable energy in motion.

  • http://ooyes.net website design

    This is great news!

  • http://ooyes.net website design

    This is great news!

  • http://ooyes.net website design

    This is great news!

  • Leon

    Actually most of Denmark’s energy is produced from Coal power.

  • Leon

    Actually most of Denmark’s energy is produced from Coal power.

  • Leon

    Actually most of Denmark’s energy is produced from Coal power.

  • http://www.efeiz.com durgesh nautiyal

    cool at least there are some one concerned about nature and environment. may god help us to lower the pollution.

  • http://www.efeiz.com durgesh nautiyal

    cool at least there are some one concerned about nature and environment. may god help us to lower the pollution.

  • http://www.efeiz.com durgesh nautiyal

    cool at least there are some one concerned about nature and environment. may god help us to lower the pollution.

  • http://www.efeiz.com durgesh nautiyal

    cool at least there are some one concerned about nature and environment. may god help us to lower the pollution.

  • http://got2begreen.com Susan

    This is great. Denmark is even able to supply a surplus of wind power. Because it’s too much they are having to find ways to distribute it to nearby countries.

  • http://got2begreen.com Susan

    This is great. Denmark is even able to supply a surplus of wind power. Because it’s too much they are having to find ways to distribute it to nearby countries.

  • http://got2begreen.com Susan

    This is great. Denmark is even able to supply a surplus of wind power. Because it’s too much they are having to find ways to distribute it to nearby countries.

  • yo bro

    It would destroy my view of the environment. Eco-view sustainability is of the utmost importance.

  • yo bro

    It would destroy my view of the environment. Eco-view sustainability is of the utmost importance.

  • David

    Well Doc Brown could have used one to generate his 1.21 gigawatts of power needed for his time machine!

  • David

    Well Doc Brown could have used one to generate his 1.21 gigawatts of power needed for his time machine!

  • Churry Fox

    Does Rock Port count as a city?

    Looks more like a village to me. Kudos all the same!

  • Churry Fox

    Does Rock Port count as a city?

    Looks more like a village to me. Kudos all the same!

  • Churry Fox

    Does Rock Port count as a city?

    Looks more like a village to me. Kudos all the same!

  • Uncle B

    Sooner than later, charging up a battery car overnight or when wind power is plentiful for spare batteries, will be easy ballast for the grid, paid for buy the consumer, so that if the wind blows strong all night, or even more some days than others, we drive fast and cheap every day. Can we trust the utilities to pass on savings during times of plenty, to offset the cost of spare batteries for our cars? Can we wire timers to charge when there is excess and hold off during peak demand times? I can hardly wait to find out!

  • Uncle B

    Sooner than later, charging up a battery car overnight or when wind power is plentiful for spare batteries, will be easy ballast for the grid, paid for buy the consumer, so that if the wind blows strong all night, or even more some days than others, we drive fast and cheap every day. Can we trust the utilities to pass on savings during times of plenty, to offset the cost of spare batteries for our cars? Can we wire timers to charge when there is excess and hold off during peak demand times? I can hardly wait to find out!

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