Tesla short sellers

The Billion-Dollar Tesla Hit Piece

The New York Times interview of Elon Musk released late in the night of August 16, 2018, clobbered Tesla’s stock price the next day, resulting in a fall of more than $30 a share by the end of Friday’s after-market trading and a single-day transfer of wealth of over a billion dollars from Tesla’s investors to the stock’s short sellers.

The Tesla Short Thesis Just Collapsed — CNN, CNBC, Forbes, & Business Insider Are Still…

We’ve covered the wild world of Tesla short sellers for a while. When the most shorted company on the stock market is a major cleantech company, CleanTechnica just has to dig into this stuff. To much better understand what short sellers are, who shorts Tesla, what the Tesla short theses have been (yes, they change from time to time), and why we’ve largely thought that shorting Tesla is idiotic, check out the 11 stories linked at the bottom of this article.

Tesla Shorts Are Scared, Exposed, & Desperate — Memo To Media: Don’t Be Duped

First of all, let’s be clear — Tesla is such a popular company now that many people in the media have to cover it, or feel inspired to cover it, who know very little about the company, its products, its history, or its finances. Some of those reporters and bloggers may think they got up to speed quickly, got the story straight, and rightfully came in with boxing gloves on to bash the company. The problem is that those people often didn’t get the full story, may have consumed and digested absolutely incorrect information, and may be out of their depths in the general topics they’re briefly covering (manufacturing, finance, cars, technology, etc.). I would say that, by and large, these people aren’t evil — they’ve just been misled.

Is The Possibility Of Perception Perversion The Real Reason Jim Chanos Is Short Tesla?

Tesla has reached its artificial milestone of producing 5,000 Model 3s per week, and media outlets (and buyers) continue to post rave reviews. The company’s three vehicles are the three top-selling EVs in the US market. Model S has been consistently outselling every competing large luxury sedan for a couple of years, and it appears as if Model 3 will similarly dominate the small sedan segment. At least two sets of auto industry experts (Munro & Associates and a group commissioned by German automakers) have performed teardowns of Model 3, and concluded that the new EV should be earning a healthy profit margin. Does this really sound like a company in trouble?