Tesla Model 3 performance

Electric Mazda … Porsche vs. Tesla Launchonanza … Gold-Free Perovskite Solar — CleanTechnica Top 20

Mazda? Mazda? A possibly lame-ass electrification effort from Mazda? Yes, apparently, that was somehow our most popular article of the week last week here on CleanTechnica. Will more than 100,000 people consider — let alone buy — the electric Mazda? I doubt it! But they’ll read about it. (Granted, Tina’s headline must have been part of the appeal, and I did think from the headline the car was going to be edible in some way.)

EV Motor Control 101

Editor’s Note: The team at Mountain Pass Performance are doing some truly cutting edge work and research on EV motor controls. They put together a comprehensive post on EV motors with some help from Chris Brune at Rinehart Motion Systems and were nice enough to let us repost it here. 

What Is A Sleeper Or Stealth Tesla Model 3 Performance?

As new buyers are researching Tesla and deciding which Model 3 version to buy, some of the options can be a bit confusing. And if you delve into the various social media groups and discussion forums, things can get even worse. One particular version of the Model 3 which is a bit of a unicorn is the so-called “Stealth” or “Sleeper” Performance model. And to describe what that is, first let’s go through a brief history of the Tesla Model 3.

Porsche Taycan — Power Hungry, Slower To Charge Than Tesla Model S (Most Of The…

After the unveiling of the new Porsche Taycan yesterday, analysts were quick to call the only electric competitor (the Tesla Model S) “ancient in comparison,” pointing out the “pathbreaking” 800 volt system that “slashes recharging times.” It is true that a higher system voltage can reduce charging times: you can feed more power to the battery without increasing the charge current. But just how good is Porsche’s implementation?

Tesla Recalibrates Model 3 Pricing & Adds Long Range Option For Aussie Customers

Tesla just rolled out a series of updates to the Model 3 configurator that lowered prices across the board in many countries. The new change was accompanied by a flip flop on the base color of all of Tesla’s vehicles — from black to “pearl white.” It is now an extra $750 to add black but no extra charge to choose white. Grey (“midnight silver metallic”) and blue (“deep blue metallic”) cost $1000 and red costs $2000.