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Browsing the "Nissan Altima" Tag

Tesla Model 3 = 7th Best Selling Car In USA*

January 19th, 2020 | by Zachary Shahan

The Tesla Model 3 ended up being the 7th best selling car in the United States in the 4th quarter of 2019 and the 9th best selling car across the whole year*


Tesla Model 3 = 9th Best Selling Car In USA

December 15th, 2019 | by Zachary Shahan

With all of the data tallied, we have one electric car in the top 20*, or in the top 10 actually — the Tesla Model 3. The Model 3, based on our estimates (with support from EV Volumes), lands in the #10 spot in the USA in November among all cars. For the first 11 months of the year, the Model 3 was in the #9 position


Nissan Altima & Maxima vs. Tesla Model 3 — Cost Comparisons Over 5 Years

June 25th, 2019 | by Zachary Shahan

To satisfy my own curiosity (and, apparently, that of millions of other people), I've been running 5-year cost comparisons of the Tesla Model 3 and other top selling cars on the US market. This round of comparisons pits the Tesla Model 3 versus the Nissan Altima and Nissan Maxima


Best Car In USA, Tesla Model 3, Is 13th Best Selling Car In 1st Quarter — What Does That Mean?

April 4th, 2019 | by Zachary Shahan

The "best car" on the market is generally something you'd think to tie to a specific price range, class, or at least body style. In 2019, though, I don't think you have to do that at all. In my humble opinion (and I'll make the case for it in a moment), the best car on the market is now cost-competitive with the highest selling mass market cars on the market. It wasn't in the first quarter, but it is in the second


Tesla Model 3 vs. US Incumbents — Gun In A Knife Fight Or Fair Fight?

March 18th, 2019 | by Vijay Govindan

I recently ran a Twitter poll to decide what to write about next. The top article the voters asked me to write was an article on how the Tesla Model Standard Range (SR) competes against models from incumbent auto manufacturers. The wonderful thing is that Tesla is now price competitive, without incentives. It is very competitive on a total cost of ownership basis. With incentives and TCO factored in, the Model 3 is tough to beat. Let’s take a look


Tesla Model 3 Costs vs. 10 Best Selling Cars In The USA

March 17th, 2019 | by Zachary Shahan

We don't really know how many Tesla Model 3s were sold in the USA in January and February, but the car should be in the top 20. With less than one day remaining to order the Model 3 Standard Range Plus for $37,000, I felt we still hadn't done enough to compare the current Model 3 options with the top selling cars in the USA. So, here's a new rundown comparison focused on one key category: 5 year total cost of ownership


Tesla Model 3 vs. Toyota Camry, Honda Accord, & Nissan Altima

March 14th, 2019 | by Zachary Shahan

There are a lot of ways to compare cars. In most cases, once you whittle down to a specific body style and price range (vehicle class), there's little difference between the options. Toyota Camry vs. Honda Accord vs. Nissan Altima — what's really the difference? BMW 3 Series vs. Audi A4 vs. Mercedes-Benz C-Class — again, the differences largely boil down to style or slight variations in features. The Tesla Model 3 versus any of these cars is an entirely different game


Tesla Model 3 = #11 Best Selling Car in USA in 2018

January 3rd, 2019 | by Zachary Shahan

The Tesla Model 3, adored by millions of Tesla fans from day one (March 31, 2016), was a lighting bolt in the US car market in 2018. The Model 3 has shown why any remaining Tesla critics should really stop doubting the 21st century car company out of Silicon Valley


Tesla Model 3 = #1 Top Selling Luxury Car in USA in October

November 14th, 2018 | by Zachary Shahan

This may have been the longest I've ever taken to create a monthly US sales report, and it may have also been the most difficult. We had a strong sense of how Tesla Model 3 production and deliveries were ramping up through the 3rd quarter, but due to the intense push to get Model 3s out the door and into customers' hands by the end of the quarter, it has been hard to estimate output in subsequent weeks — much of October


Toyota Camry & Honda Accord Buyers, Don’t Assume Tesla Model 3 Is Beyond Your Budget

October 28th, 2018 | by Paul Fosse

Today, I want to update my use of the Edmunds True Cost to Own model to analyze the market for mainstream midsize sedans. I'll compare the Tesla Model 3 Standard Range to all the leaders in the midsize market today. The short story, as you'll see if you go through it all, is that the much quicker, safer, and more luxurious Tesla Model 3 can be cost-competitive with the Toyota Camry, Honda Accord, Kia Optima, and Chevy Malibu


Tesla Model 3 = 4th Best Selling Car In USA* (Maybe)

October 3rd, 2018 | by Zachary Shahan

I just spent a long time — much of the day — putting together 8 charts and graphs comparing Tesla to its luxury brand competitors in the USA. In particular, I took a gander at how the Tesla Model 3 is delivering a swift lebewohl to the small and midsize luxury cars it's competing against


Tesla Model 3 = 5th Best Selling Car In United States

September 6th, 2018 | by Zachary Shahan

Three weeks ago, I published that I expected the Tesla Model 3 would be the 5th best selling car in the United States in August. That has now been confirmed. (Note: we're just talking cars, not SUVs or pickup trucks.)


7 Charts — Tesla Model 3 vs The Competition (US Sales)

August 6th, 2018 | by Zachary Shahan

As Tesla Model 3 production and sales have grown, I've felt more and more inspired to compare the car's scorecard against that of other models. I intended to update my "Small & Midsize Luxury Car Sales" charts and report this weekend, but then got a bit carried away. As a result, below are 7 sales charts regarding the Tesla Model 3 and some of its wide ranging "competition," which includes not only small and midsize luxury cars but also some of the most popular, mass-market cars in the United States



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