Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

CleanTechnica
Following the recent ruling by a court in Germany that cities there have the right to ban diesel cars as a means of improving air quality, the share of the country's total auto market held by diesel cars has been falling sharply.

Clean Transport

Diesel Car Market Share Fell In March In Germany

Following the recent ruling by a court in Germany that cities there have the right to ban diesel cars as a means of improving air quality, the share of the country’s total auto market held by diesel cars has been falling sharply.

Following the recent ruling by a court in Germany that cities there have the right to ban diesel cars as a means of improving air quality, the share of the country’s total auto market held by diesel cars has been falling sharply.

During March of 2017, the market share held by diesel cars apparently fell by around 25%, according to the KBA, following on market share losses of 19.5% in February and 17.6% in January. All of that being said, diesel car sales in Germany are still fairly high.

This drop in market share held by diesel cars has led to local manufacturers such as Volkswagen beginning to offer special incentives meant to sustain sales, such as the so-called “Germany Guarantee.”

Reuters provides a bit more information: “The KBA also said total registrations in Germany fell 3.4% to 347,433 passenger cars, because of two fewer selling days, though first-quarter registrations increased 4% to 878,611 vehicles, confirming what an auto industry source told Reuters. Sales in Spain were up 2.1% in March but fell 5.8% in Italy, with diesel registrations continuing their decline in both markets, according to analysts.”

Adding to the view provided by those figures, a senior partner and automotive specialist at EY, Peter Fuss, noted (as quoted by Reuters): “For the time being, new diesel sales will not recover. Rather, the downtrend looks set to continue in coming months.”

Fuss added that diesel car market share was likely to fall to around 25% over the coming months, down from the current ~31%.

While such a drop is likely to hit the pocketbooks of affected auto manufacturers pretty hard, a 25% market share is still pretty high. How much further will it fall than that?

 
 
Appreciate CleanTechnica’s originality? Consider becoming a CleanTechnica member, supporter, or ambassador — or a patron on Patreon.
 
Sign up for our free daily newsletter to never miss a story.
 
Have a tip for CleanTechnica, want to advertise, or want to suggest a guest for our CleanTech Talk podcast? Contact us here.


New Podcast: Lyft's 100% Electrification Target, Autonomy, Charging

Written By

James Ayre's background is predominantly in geopolitics and history, but he has an obsessive interest in pretty much everything. After an early life spent in the Imperial Free City of Dortmund, James followed the river Ruhr to Cofbuokheim, where he attended the University of Astnide. And where he also briefly considered entering the coal mining business. He currently writes for a living, on a broad variety of subjects, ranging from science, to politics, to military history, to renewable energy.

Comments

You May Also Like

Cars

Carsharing was all the rage a few years ago, and then especially electric carsharing … and then the trend faded. In the city where...

Cars

Plugin electric vehicles (fully electric vehicles as well as plugin hybrids) had a sales increase of 43% in 2020 compared to 2019 according to...

Cars

Germany, Europe's largest auto market, hit 21.7% plugin electric vehicle share in January, up over 3× from January 2021. This is already substantially above...

Cars

Mercedes-Benz has just shown off its incoming EQA full battery electric vehicle, due to start European deliveries in March 2021. The range and charging...

Copyright © 2021 CleanTechnica. The content produced by this site is for entertainment purposes only. Opinions and comments published on this site may not be sanctioned by and do not necessarily represent the views of CleanTechnica, its owners, sponsors, affiliates, or subsidiaries.