Cars

Published on March 25th, 2016 | by Kyle Field

103

World Green Car of the Year Award is Just Another Bad Joke

March 25th, 2016 by  

The New York International Auto Show is in full swing, and with every auto show comes another set of awards. This year, the NYIAS was home to the announcement of the 2016 World Green Car, which was announced on Friday in a press conference.

2015_SEMA_Toyota_BTTF_Mirai_017_33CF40E2CA269E3DCA1B9BC202AEAF8DF8EB744C

I believe I can fly! | Image courtesy Toyota

The award is in its 12th year, and while it was slow on the green car front for the first few years, there are now quite a few battery-electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) that offer owners a much lower carbon footprint and, in some cases, completely enable decoupling driving from emissions.

This award winner is chosen by a panel of 70+ international automotive journalists that vote on a winner each year. The list of 8 finalists was pared down to a short list of 3, which included the Chevrolet Volt (PHEV), the Toyota Prius (Hybrid), and the Toyota Mirai (Hydrogen Fuel Cell). The official press release shared that finalist vehicles had to be:

“All-new, or substantially revised, in production and introduced for sale or lease to the public in quantities of at least 10 in at least one major market during the period beginning January 1, 2015 and ending May 31, 2016.  Tailpipe emissions, fuel consumption, and use of a major advanced power plant technology (beyond engine componentry), aimed specifically at increasing the vehicle’s environmental responsibility, were all taken into consideration.”

The 2016 winner is the Toyota Mirai, which seems like a really odd selection to those of us in the cleantech industry because it’s not actually being sold at the moment and it’s not actually that green. Toyota put deliveries of the Mirai on hold in January because there simply isn’t enough of a fueling station network to make the car viable. The big number here is 23. That’s the number of hydrogen fueling stations in the US today. Total.

fuelingstations_US

Current US hydrogen fueling station network | Image courtesy Energy.gov

We regularly dig into the network of fuel cell fueling stations in the US here on CleanTechnica because it is such a large barrier to the adoption of fuel cell vehicles. Critics point to hydrogen fueling stations being about the same price to install as a gas station, but with hydrogen fueling stations having no widespread customer base to feed.

It’s the ultimate chicken or egg question… but why spend any of it? Basically, would we pay to install a completely new, trillion-dollar infrastructure when battery-electric vehicles just need a normal wall outlet… at any of the billions of locations in the world that already have them? Makes no sense to me.

The Mirai continues the Toyota push for a technology that still has several major hurdles to overcome before it could even be considered a viable car for anyone not living within ~10 miles of the existing hydrogen filling stations. Even beyond that niche market, there are significant issues with hydrogen and fuel cells which we have discussed in great length here and on EV Obsession.

Back to the award, this is another example of mainstream automotive media not penetrating an emerging market sufficiently prior to locking in on a candidate. It’s unfortunate, but as the market continues to evolve, let’s hope that mainstream industry “experts” start doing their research into what a green car actually is before making their collective voices heard… or at least play it safe and vote for the Volt.


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About the Author

I'm a tech geek passionately in search of actionable ways to reduce the negative impact my life has on the planet, save money and reduce stress. Live intentionally, make conscious decisions, love more, act responsibly, play. The more you know, the less you need. TSLA investor. Tesla referral link: http://ts.la/kyle623



  • Michael B

    I think I must have just found Dumb(est?), because I am dumbfounded.

  • Roger Lambert

    Well, you are all hideously wrong, wrong, wrong. ;D

    Hydrogen might yet be the lingua franca of our energy future. A single carbon-free fuel and storage medium useful for auto transportation, aviation, possibly ocean transportation.

    More importantly, you can heat your home with it with almost no additional cost for the billions of homeowners living in cold lattitudes who can’t afford to spend $5000 a room for cold-weather heat pumps. This stuff will burn in boilers and furnaces.

    You can cook with it, run your generator on it, run your refrigerator on it. You can pipe it to all the buildings in a city. It could replace or supplement billions of batteries, and can be generated and stored at scales from a single household to regional facilities.

    The main drawback is that the conversion from electricity to stored hydrogen is not very efficient. The question is – does this matter? It may not matter a whit. If we are smart, we will overbuild our renewable infrastructure by a large amount. Because we must, if we want uninterrupted supply even during sub-optimal conditions. Which means on many days, we will be in overabundant supply of electricity – and then hydrogen may be more useful and cost-effective than gigantic, expensive battery or kinetic stations.

    Hydrogen might be the best way to go IF we want to keep our energy future as low cost as possible. Or, it may not. But we don’t know yet, and that is why the Mirai is worthy of the award.

    • Jonas Blomberg

      I agree with Roger Lambert. Mirai is an admirable achievement. The question of hydrogen stations which are not yet operative is not very relevant. They will soon be. Save your acid comments for the real culprits, the ICE proponents.

      • Bob_Wallace

        Both of you need to engage in deeper thinking.

        To assume that we would have enough ‘unused’ electricity to make hydrogen cheap is unrealistic. Certainly not in amounts necessary to power personal transportation.

      • Joe Viocoe

        “They will be soon” is the single biggest lie they’ve told.
        And they have been spinning this lie,… to keep selling internal combustion as long as possible.
        Toyota isn’t interested in selling hydrogen cars… But to appear green and forward thinking, while they build more hybrids.

        • Harry Johnson

          This explains why the Mirai is so seriously butt-ugly. But the superior Prius isn’t much better…

        • Greg Hudson

          BMW have had a 7 series H powered car for what… 20 years maybe? We can all see how well that has gone down.

      • Kyle Field

        It’s the car of the year award…not the car of next year…or the year after that. This year….today…right now, it’s not practical. They aren’t even selling it anymore.

    • Joe Viocoe

      Except that the real world costs are no where near that fantasy.

    • Kyle Field

      Key word…paragraph 2, word 2: “might”
      Conversion efficiency *might* not matter in the future but it does today. Immensely so as every bit of extra efficiency we can eek out is one less percentage we don’t have to make with fossil fuels. In a future of renewables + storage, efficiency might not matter…we’re just not there yet.

      tl;dr hydrogen might be a great solution in 10 or 20 years. Today? not so much.

    • eveee

      Non starter. This old hat. Get up to date and do some research. Compare.

      “There are two huge problems with FCVs for those who worry about global warming and hence net greenhouse gas emissions:

      In general, some 95% of our hydrogen is currently produced from natural gas, or, rather, from the methane (CH4) that compromises most of natural gas.

      Making hydrogen from renewable resources like carbon-free electricity is expensive and an incredibly wasteful use of that valuable resource.”

      http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2014/08/05/3467115/tesla-toyota-hydrogen-cars-batteries/

      A renewables plus hydrogen transport structure would be enormously more expensive than an electric one.

      While the other applications are interesting, they are not likely to be mainstream if they cant compete with existing tech. Thats not the case with EVs which are now beating ICE in every way in the luxury catagory, and soon in the mid lux category of personal transport.

  • CT needs its own awards for EVs, and a host of other things clean. Zach… 🙂

  • socrateos

    Too bad. It’s always tough for any religious zealot to accept reality. EV zealots are no exception.

    • Philip W

      I’m waiting on the information that you wanted to provide about what reality is…oh wait, right, you didn’t. You just like to throw around empty phrases.

      • socrateos

        EV religion is pretty much a US phenomena. The Elon cult has not spread to the rest of the world. That is the reality, and you cannot see it, can you? Pity.

        • Philip W

          What I don’t see is information in your posts.

        • Joe Viocoe

          Um, the Nissan Leaf is selling very well internationally.

          The Mirai, not so much.

          • socrateos

            Sure Nissan Leaf and other EVs are selling in the rest of the word, including Japan. But it is just another technology and business, not a religion, in the rest of the world.

            It’s totally different here in US, where there is a cult – the EV religion.

          • Joe Viocoe

            It has nothing to with EVs. Americans are very excitable when it comes to car culture. There are Mustang cults, Pickup Truck cults, etc.

          • Bob_Wallace

            Please don’t be a doofus. We’ve already got one, don’t need a second.

        • Kyle Field

          The Tesla Model S is the top rated car that Consumer Reports has ever seen. Ever. That’s statistics. Tell me more about this EV religion you dreamed up…
          http://cdn.meme.am/instances/500x/44819769.jpg

  • Bob Fearn

    The ” 70+ international automotive journalists” have always voted with their wallets.

  • SkyHunter

    Fool cells. Sounds to me like someone is hyping hydrogen.

    • just_jim

      Fool cells. Sounds to me like someone is hyping hydrogen. natural gas.

      FIFY

      • SkyHunter

        Natural gas is currently the biggest source of hydrogen. Although AC Transit uses solar and biogas to power electrolyzers.
        It is the greenest public transportation in the world.

        • Bob_Wallace

          Any idea what their hydrogen costs compared to reformed methane?

          • SkyHunter

            They make it themselves. The solar is virtually free, now that it has been installed. The biogas comes from landfill and nearby farms. I assume the price varies.

          • Joe Viocoe

            Now that it has been installed…. Time to start paying off the equipment, which takes several years if not decades.
            With battery electric cars, that FREE solar could be paid off in 1/3rd the time.

          • Bob_Wallace

            Correct, Joe. The equipment has a cost. The claim of ‘virtually free’ is only a claim that there is no ongoing fuel cost to power the system.

          • Joe Viocoe

            But if used to make hydrogen, there’s the water cost, and electrolysis maintenance.

            And even components don’t last forever… So if payback takes 18 years, and things start needing replacement at 20 years…. It isn’t free either.

          • Kyle Field

            I’m on board with this. I wrote it up a few months ago and it’s just a great fit:
            http://cleantechnica.com/2015/11/13/evs-pvs-driving-sunshine/

          • SkyHunter

            Well, the efficiency of hydrogen electrolysis is not much different than BEV.

          • Joe Viocoe

            Yes, yes it is.

          • Bob_Wallace

            It takes 2x to 3x as much electricity to move a FCEV a mile as it takes to move an EV a mile if the energy is stored as hydrogen rather than in batteries.

            If we drove FCEVs rather than EVs we’d need to install more than two times as many solar panels and wind turbines to make up for the inefficiency of hydrogen.

            The graphic is a bit out of date, fuel cells are somewhat more efficient now than when this was put together.

          • Joe Viocoe

            They’ve reached 60% under optimal conditions.

          • Bob_Wallace

            That’s optimal. I remember hearing 43% for one of the FCEVs.

            But let’s use a higher FC efficiency of 60% and work through the numbers in the graphic.

            Hydrogen arrives in the FCEV tank with an energy equivalent of 51 kWh after starting at 100 kWh.

            At 60% efficiency 30.6 kWh of electricity will be produced. Ten percent of that will be lost in the EV part of the car resulting in 27.5 kWh of kinetic energy.

            The EV (assuming EVs haven’t improved) brings 69 kWh of kinetic energy to the road. That’s 2.5 x as much as the FCEV.using compressed hydrogen.

          • Joe Viocoe

            Yep yep.

            People think that renewable means free… so they take 100 kwh for granted as if it just takes a bit more time to generate and store as hydrogen.
            It is a resource that takes a lot of capital expense to collect.. and wasting so much is unacceptable. And all because of a perceived benefit of a 5 minute refuel time that turned out to be untenable.

          • Bob_Wallace

            2.5x more cost on the generation end plus the cost of the extraction, compression, transportation and distribution hardware.

            There would also be labor and real estate costs for a hydrogen refueling system which would be another cost increaser.

          • SkyHunter

            You don’t need to convince me. I have been a BEV fan from the get go. Toyota is wasting time and money.

          • SkyHunter
          • Bob_Wallace

            I looked at your links and saw nothing about the cost of hydrogen. I’d appreciate it if you directly answered the question or stated that you don’t know.

            Dropping bare links is bad form.

          • SkyHunter

            I answered in my first comment. The links were just FYI.
            [Edit] I just looked at the thread and realized my first comment did not post.
            I do not know the cost differences.

          • Kyle Field

            So AC Transit says “Fuel cells provide electric power at an average efficiency of 52%” It’s not clear to me if that’s the efficiency from electricity to power at the wheels or from hydrogen to electricity or…

            “Electric vehicles convert about 59%–62% of the electrical energy from the grid to power at the wheels”

            I don’t have time to dig further at the moment…

          • Bob_Wallace

            52% efficiency turning the energy in hydrogen into electricity is on the high side for a fuel cell.

            At the fuel cell level, at 52% efficiency, you have to install two solar panels to give you the same range as an EV.

            Then one has to add in the energy used to crack the water, to compress the hydrogen, and to transport the hydrogen.

  • MuddyWolf

    Drivers in California who are leasing the Hyundai Tucson fuel cell SUV are reporting that they enjoy driving the vehicles but they experience constant problems refueling them. Apparently the fueling stations are often out of service, and when they are operational, they can only refuel one or two vehicles before they must shut down again for hours to pressurize the hydrogen gas. If the production of hydrogen from natural gas is 80% efficient, wouldn’t it be easier and nearly as green to get a vehicle that runs on natural gas that you can refill at home?

    • Kyle Field

      I could see FCEVs being more attractive if home electrolysis made sense. Unfortunately, it’s just not competitive with battery electric. I drove the Mirai a few months back and was not impressed. Comparable to the Prius but every EV I’ve driven blows it away. It would be nice if they could somehow get the water it generates into a bottle that could be consumed.
      http://cleantechnica.com/2015/10/05/back-future-driving-toyota-mirai-hydrogen-fuel-cell-vehicle/

    • QKodiak

      Both hydrogen and natural gas powered vehicles have the same limitations, except that there are 906 NG stations nationwide and just 23 hydrogen stations, 20 in California. They are both slow, inefficient, have relatively short real-world ranges, take forever to fillup at home (~8 hrs) and use a lot of energy (0.85 kW/h) to do so, and they are not as clean as they claim to be.

      Plug-in hybrids are a much better idea all-around. There is nothing that an NG or H2 car does that a PHEV can’t do better, quicker, and more efficiently.

      Just compare a Chevy Volt to the hideous Toyota Mirai or Honda Civic NG. There’s just no comparison! I frankly can’t wait for the Tesla Model III!

      • Greg Hudson

        We have thousands of NG sites in Australia, and about the only drivers that use them are TAXI’s. Virtually no private buyers for what is an apparently cheaper fuel option. Why? I have no idea, NG is just not popular.

  • Philip W

    And with that they have lost all their credibility. Complete disgrace for automotive journalism.

    The Volt I could accept as finalist because of the range, but the Prius and Mirai? And then the Mirai even ‘wins’? What the actual fuck?

  • Robert Pollock

    Auto and Oil companies work together. They can see the writing on the wall as plainly as early adapters/adopters do. There is no question in my mind that some large scale development and marketing policies on the part of companies like Toyota and GM (Detroit) are designed to slow down the process so that all the profits can be had along the way. That means retaining the gas station infrastructure by selling the public on Hydrogen fuel cell cars. It also means the whole ‘Hybrid’ mix of part electric part petro cars is another stall or delaying tactic. The hybrids are technically electric cars with anemic drive lines attached to a gas-fired generator. All that hardware, trouble and stink just to keep buying gasoline. There is no good reason to go slowly on this, we’re not going to the Moon. There are lots of good reasons to pick up the pace, or we may have to go to Mars.

    • Bob_Wallace

      There are a lot of auto manufacturers.

      Some are going to jump into EVs when Tesla (probably) demonstrates the demand for ‘entry level luxury’ EVs.

      • Steve Grinwis

        I suspect that they’ll be supply capped for quite a few years, unless something goes horribly wrong.

        • Kyle Field

          I see no surge of demand for the EVs they are building yet. Tesla created a new market, raised the bar across the board and singlehandedly defined EVs for the mainstream. The demand for Tesla and attraction of the brand is insane. I get questions all the time about it. “So there’s really no motor?” “How often do you have to fill up?” “what’s the range?” “How fast is it?” It’s crazy/awesome.

    • Greg Hudson

      There may no be as much ‘stink’ as you think… I was speaking to a BMW i3 driver a few weeks ago, and she said she had only put petrol (gasolene?) in her car ONCE in 6 months, and was advised this by BMW so the small amount of fuel on board would not go stale (so she told me). She plugs in every night, and has a full tank of juice every morning – she loves her car.

  • Larry

    The blind leading the blind

  • Dragon

    Mirai is too, viable! If you need to travel beyond a hydrogen station, just tow it with a Model X! Simple.

    • Wilibald Oplatek

      Also, if you tow it with the X, you’ll have the fastest Mirai on the planet.

      • Steve Grinwis

        This made me LOL for real. Have an upvote. 🙂

  • Vastmandana

    Stupid… this is just embarrassing

  • Rikaishi Rikashi

    How can they even consider a hybrid when there are eligible EVs? And how can they possible justify not naming the Model X on their shortlist at the very least?

    • Calamity_Jean

      Stupidity?

      • Michael B

        “Stupid is as stupid does.”

    • Rceldib

      Easy, they are bought off by the auto industry, Big Oil, and auto dealer associations. A Hybrid has a gasoline engine. That is what the auto industry knows how to make and they have 100,000 mechanical engineers that know how to make Internal Combustion Engines. They complex machines are serviced by the car dealers and Big Oil supplies the fuel. The Journalist are wined and dined by these three 800 lb gorillas. They get free cars to drive, they get free trips all over the world. They get taken the big three’s jets to car races, stays at resorts, hospitality suites at the races. Do you think the journalists are going to put Tesla in that list. No way. Just like Hillary says the millions of dollars given to her doesn’t effect how she votes, so say the journalists.

  • Joe Viocoe

    Of the 14 California H2 stations:

    Coalinga
    Costa Mesa (Soft Opening)
    Diamond Bar
    La Cañada Flintridge (Soft Opening) – DOWN
    Lake Forest (Soft Opening)
    Long Beach (Soft Opening)
    San Jose (Soft Opening)
    San Juan Cap (Soft Opening) – DOWN
    Santa Monica (Soft Opening)
    Saratoga (Soft Opening)
    South San Francisco (Soft Opening)
    UC Irvine (Soft Opening)
    West LA
    West Sacramento

    2 are Down right now. And the “Soft Opening” stations are subject to going down at any time.
    You are advised to always call ahead.

    For most other Stations…. calling ahead is required.

    ——————-

    This seriously reminds me of Biodiesel stations… with the call-ahead, the frequent supply outages, and the limited hours.
    They were all the rage in the 2000’s… then, suddenly, the $1/gal blender credit went away… and all the stations stopped selling the stuff. Just like that, gone.

    It is one thing to have a production vehicle heavily subsidized. When you buy it, you’ve got it. But if the infrastructure is dependent on a heavy subsidy, and it goes away… you’ve got a brick in your garage.

    • jonesey

      Not sure what you’re talking about with biodiesel. I’ve been buying it since 2005, and I never have trouble finding it, at least in medium to large urban areas on the west coast, which is where I drive. We have two stations in our city of 200,000 that are open 24/7, self-service.

      http://biodiesel.org/using-biodiesel/finding-biodiesel/retail-locations/retail-map

      That said, 200-mile-range reasonably priced EVs cannot come to market soon enough for me. My electrical outlet is open 24/7 too, and it’s closer, cleaner, quieter, and less expensive!

      • Joe Viocoe

        I had to move to California before I got a reliable supply again. The South-East used to have a whole lot more… then it all disappeared very quickly. In CA, high fuel prices keep alternatives competitive though.

    • neroden

      So there are only four real hydrogen stations, all in California.

      And if one person fills up, the next person can’t fill up for half an hour as the station attempts to compress the hydrogen again…. pathetic.

      • Calamity_Jean

        “… pathetic.”

        Very.

    • Kyle Field

      Great detail on the stations, thanks! It’s crazy to me that people are buying [freakin’ expensive!] cars with infrastructure this unreliable…

      • Joe Viocoe

        They really aren’t buying. We are talking maybe a couple hundred.. With most coming from fleet buyers either trying to buy some green washing cred, or have the unique ability to manage a fueling station themselves.

  • eveee

    This could be like MT car of the year award, or a SI pick. They have the effect of cursing the awarded party.
    Maybe they figure why not award them. They won’t be around in five years.

  • Ivor O’Connor

    This award winner is chosen by a panel of 70+ international automotive journalists that vote on a winner each year.

    More proof you should never rely on experts. Instead do your own homework and form your own opinions.

    • Rceldib

      Once again, just like our elected officials that take bribes and say it does not affect their decisions, the automotive journalists get wined and dined by the car companies, except for Tesla which does not participate in this graft. The journalists therefore don’t even acknowledge that Tesla exists in these awards.

  • JamesWimberley

    Automobile journalists are Mr. Toads. All they care about is Whee!

  • JamesWimberley

    Automobile journalists are Mr. Toads. All they care about is Whee!

    • Ronald Brakels

      It doesn’t even out urinate the competition with its 0 to 60 mph time of 9 seconds being the same as the Volt. I don’t know what other vehicles were in the running besides the Prius, but the Tesla Stupid can apparently Whee! from 0 to 60 in 2.8 seconds.

      • Steve Grinwis

        It’s worse that that. The Mirai 0-60 is 9.4 seconds, but the updated 2016 Volt does it in 7.8 seconds….

        That 1.6 seconds is a LOT in automotive turns. The Mirai is basically a dog. And it’ll cost you a lot to do it with all that hydrogen you’d be burning too…

        • Kyle Field

          On top of that, the Bolt is going to be pretty zippy. Exciting times 🙂

    • Kyle Field

      The Model S packs more whee per gallon than any gasmobile I’ve driven 😀

  • Carl Raymond S

    Next year’s winner is the Bolt. Year after, the Model 3.
    Unless they want to look like complete frauds.
    The ICE age endeth.

    • Mike

      Well they do look so for selecting the Mizerai…

    • Kyle Field

      I agree with your predictions. 2018 might be up in the air as quite a few manufacturers are targeting that timing for next gen EVs – Mercedes, Volvo, Audi, VW, etc etc. It’s getting really exciting in the EV world 😀

  • Carl Raymond S

    Next year’s winner is the Bolt. Year after, the Model 3.
    Unless they want to look like complete frauds.
    The ICE age endeth.

  • josef novak

    Lol just another blsht from combustion grabage can makers. These petrolhead car show are obsolete and nobody needs them anymore.

    • Steve Grinwis

      While I agree the result is silly, I’m totally going to the local international auto show next year specifically to see the Model 3. I went last year to see the Bolt.

      • neroden

        I doubt Model 3 will be at the auto show.

        • Steve Grinwis

          Why? The Model S was…. Don’t break my heart here…

          • Rceldib

            Tesla never shows up at the Los Angeles Auto Show. I think the reason is that the Auto Dealer Association runs the show and we know how they feel about Tesla. The car dealers make their money on “Service” or should I say maintenance. As the electric cars need so little maintenance, they want nothing to do with electrics.

          • Steve Grinwis

            The Toronto show had the Tesla in with the other 100k and up cars, so beside the Maserati’s. Those were behind velvet rope, and had a guy playing a grand piano. The Tesla had a nerd, with a polo. The lineup to see the Tesla was consistently 20+ people, and no one cared about the Maserati’s. It was hilarious.

          • neroden

            Ah, Toronto. Canada doesn’t have those damn dealership laws, right? (I haven’t looked this up, maybe they do?) So Tesla may show up at the Canadian auto shows.

            Tesla’s been avoiding the auto shows in the US, probably because they’re run by the dealerships who have been causing so much problems.

          • Steve Grinwis

            Apparently, the Model X made it’s auto-show debut in Toronto, so it seems as though Toronto at least, is on the auto-show circuit for Tesla.

            http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/tesla-model-x-toronto-1.3444090

          • Kraylin

            I don’t recall reading about any dealership issues here in Toronto, Tesla has retail stores here and I don’t think they were contested. I am unsure of the rest of Canada but that market wouldn’t be significant anyway.

          • Kraylin

            They had an X at the Toronto show as well and you could barely get close to it with the sea of people trying to get a closer look.

            My only complaint, the “Tesla” rep consistently denied that Model X’s weren’t readily available. He would not admit that an order placed today wouldn’t result in a car for quite some time. I suspect it may not even be this year although their website (In Canada) still currently says “latter half of 2016” I suppose it you order a fully loaded version the queue priority that gains may get you a Model X this year…

            I am looking forward to when production numbers for the X smooth out at whatever their new factory capacity is once they remedy supply issues. I think I read 800-1000/week of both the S and X as a production target?

          • eveee

            You may also say repairs. LOL. Riches to be made there.

          • Rikaishi Rikashi

            If the model 3 is supply-constrained then Tesla may avoid showing it off for a few years until they get the backlog under control.

          • Steve Grinwis

            I guess that’s true, but it would still make me sad.

          • Kraylin

            Auto Shows are simply a form of advertising and they cost big money. Although I agree with the thoughts above that the dealership challenges and associations likely play into Tesla’s appearance or lack of attendance at Auto Shows, I think the simpler answer is Tesla still doesn’t need to spend money advertising their product so limited shows isn’t necessarily a bad thing.

          • Michael B

            (Auto) Shows needs no apostrophe.

            — That Guy

          • Kraylin

            Surely you can contribute more than that to the discussion….

    • Steve Grinwis

      While I agree the result is silly, I’m totally going to the local international auto show next year specifically to see the Model 3. I went last year to see the Bolt.

  • josef novak

    Lol just another blsht from combustion grabage can makers. These petrolhead car show are obsolete and nobody needs them anymore.

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