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Batteries

Published on August 26th, 2015 | by James Ayre

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ALISE — European Union Launching €7 Million Project To Bring Lithium-Sulfur Batteries To Commercial Readiness

August 26th, 2015 by  


The European Union — as part of its Horizon 2020 research + development program — is launching a new project centered on the effort to bring lithium-sulfur battery technologies to commercial readiness, according to recent reports.

The new €6,899,233 ($7.6 million) collaboration, ALISE (Advanced Lithium Sulfur battery for xEV), aims to achieve the creation of a stable 500 watt-hour/kilogram lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery cell by 2019.

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The project calls for the development of all key components of the battery cell — a cathode, anode, and the electrolyte — and is intended to finish with a vey lightweight 17 kilowatt-hour (kWh) battery to be tested for use on both tracks and also public roads. Leading, managing, and coordinating the research effort will be the organization LEITAT.

Green Car Congress provides more:

Initial materials research will be scaled up during the project so that pilot scale quantities of the new materials will be introduced into the novel cell designs, delivering advancements over the current state-of-the-art. Activities will be focused on the elaboration of new materials and processes at TRL4.

The largest single funding award to the 15 participating partners goes to UK-based Li-S battery company OXIS Energy (€953,025 / US$1,050,000), which has already achieved 325 Wh/kg with its Lithium-sulfur technology. OXIS will lead the work to develop the anode, the critical area needed to achieve high cycle life. Aided by LEITAT, The Technical University of Dresden, Polito and C-Tech Innovation, OXIS will develop both anode coatings and alternatives to the pure lithium used today.

The cathode and electrolyte are also set to be developed by OXIS; with aid from Fraunhofer IWS + Solvionic. Following these developments, work will be done to bring things up to the pilot production scale level.

Image Credit: ALISE






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About the Author

's background is predominantly in geopolitics and history, but he has an obsessive interest in pretty much everything. After an early life spent in the Imperial Free City of Dortmund, James followed the river Ruhr to Cofbuokheim, where he attended the University of Astnide. And where he also briefly considered entering the coal mining business. He currently writes for a living, on a broad variety of subjects, ranging from science, to politics, to military history, to renewable energy. You can follow his work on Google+.



  • NRG4All

    From a practical standpoint, how does “500 watt-hour/kilogram” translate from the cell level to the battery pack level? The Nissan LEAF’s battery pack is 250 kg, but I don’t know what the weight of the cells within the pack are. Thus, it is tough to make a comparison. Anybody know?

  • omar

    They should be able to speed up as the technology theory is already proven, 2020 is to far…

    • Foersom

      For R&D in a field like this, 2020 is like next month.

      In 2012 I talked to an IBM researcher in Lithium-air batteries. I asked him when we could expect to see those in the market, he said maybe 2025, perhaps later.

  • timbuck93

    “The largest single funding award to the 15 participating partners
    goes to UK-based Li-S battery company OXIS Energy (€953,025 /
    US$1,050,000), which has already achieved 325 Wh/kg with its
    Lithium-sulfur technology.”

    325 Wh/kg WOW!
    Why is all of this italic?

    test

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