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E.ON Solar Finishes Building Its First Facility In California

Originally published on Solar Love.

The noted solar energy company E.ON Solar (a subsidiary of E.ON) has finished the development of its first solar energy facility in California, according to recent reports.

The new facility — dubbed “Alamo,” a 20 megawatt (MW) facility in San Bernardino County near the town of Oro Grande — is also the first facility owned by E.ON Solar to be sold in the US, as the company already sold the project to Dominion.

E.on

“E.ON Solar is very proud of Alamo, our first project completed in California,” stated Steve Trenholm, the president of E.ON Solar. “We intend to build more solar projects in California that create jobs as well as clean energy that doesn’t use water in the production of electricity.”

“The Alamo Solar transaction demonstrates E.ON’s continued ability to deliver high-value renewable energy projects, either solar or wind, that attract the interest of world-class energy investors like Dominion,” commented Nathanael Esposito, vice president, Partnering, North America, E.ON.

A recent press release provides a bit more:

E.ON’s global experience enables it to build quality, economical solar projects on schedule and on budget, whether E.ON or another entity is the owner or operator. In 2014, Tucson Electric Power (TEP) selected E.ON Solar to build an array on the US Army’s Ft Huachuca base in Sierra Vista, Arizona, after seeing E.ON’s industry-leading capabilities up close.

The 14 MW (AC) photovoltaic project is the US Department of Defense’s largest solar array on a military installation. In early 2015, E.ON brought the Ft Huachuca solar project, which has 57,000 panels and serves approximately 25% of the base’s electricity needs, into service. TEP also purchases power from two E.ON facilities, Valencia Solar and Tech Park Solar, located near Tucson.

“E.ON Solar is rapidly expanding its development pipeline across the country with a flexible business model that allows us to work with utilities and others to own and operate projects, or build turn-key projects. This is an exciting time for the US market and E.ON is at the forefront of delivering clean energy that doesn’t require water to produce electricity,” Trenholm continued.

Worth noting here is that E.ON Solar has already begun work on a new solar energy project in California, currently expected to be completed later this year.

Image Credit: E.ON Solar

 
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Written By

James Ayre's background is predominantly in geopolitics and history, but he has an obsessive interest in pretty much everything. After an early life spent in the Imperial Free City of Dortmund, James followed the river Ruhr to Cofbuokheim, where he attended the University of Astnide. And where he also briefly considered entering the coal mining business. He currently writes for a living, on a broad variety of subjects, ranging from science, to politics, to military history, to renewable energy.

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