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Published on July 29th, 2014 | by Roy L Hales

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New Online Tools From Fraunhofer ISE

July 29th, 2014 by  


Originally published in the ECOreport.

Monthly electricity generation in Germany in 2014, as seen July 26 2014 - Courtesy Fraunhofer ISE

Monthly electricity generation in Germany in 2014, as seen July 26 2014 – Courtesy Fraunhofer ISE

The chart above is a screenshot from Fraunhofer ISE’s new online chart of Germany’s monthly electricity generation. The interesting thing about that seventh column is that I am writing on July 26. The month is not over, but I can already access the data on how much energy has been produced by every sector to date. If you go to their page, you can get the numbers by hovering over the appropriate energy report. People who want a more accurate persecutive of how things are unfolding can change the settings to weekly or daily. The new online tools from Fraunhofer ISE enable immediate access to kinds of data previously only obtainable through third-party reports.

Courtesy Fraunhofer ISE

Courtesy Fraunhofer ISE

“By making the data available on this website, it is our intent to promote transparent and objective discussions relating to all factors regarding the energy transformation in Germany,” Professor Eicke Weber said in Fraunhofer ISE’s press release.

“Our graphs of electricity production are very popular: for one, because we collect the data from several neutral sources and secondly because we continually update the time series data promptly,” reports Professor Bruno Burger, who heads the data collection department.

Electricity Import and Export in Europe in April 2014

Electricity Import and Export in Europe in April 2014 – Courtesy Fraunhofer ISE

Want to get a picture of Europe’s energy trade? Click on this link and you can access a circular graph. Note that you can set it to a German or European perspective. I chose European, to the left, and found that the latest data was from April.

You can focus on individual countries without changing the setting.

Looking at Germany’s network, from within “Electricity Import and Export in Europe in April 2014″

Looking at Germany’s network, from within “Electricity Import and Export in Europe in April 2014″ – Courtesy Fraunhofer ISE

I decided to look at Germany from this perspective. Notice how the orange bands are thicker on the German (DE) side? That’s because Germany has positive trade balances with the Netherlands, Austria, Switzerland, Poland, and Luxembourg. You can get the precise figures by going to their page and hovering over the bands. (That does not transfer vis a screenshot, unfortunately.) On the top orange band, for example, it says that so far this year Germany has exported 9.4 TWh to the Netherlands, and imported 10 GWh.

Want to know how the same data look if you change the settings to “Germany” rather than “Europe”? Looks like all it did was drop the countries Germany is not trading with.

Germany’s electricity trade relationships in April 2014

Germany’s electricity trade relationships in April 2014 – Courtesy Fraunhofer ISE

Another graph lets you see the wholesale price of electricity along with the various types of energy being fed to the grid. It will let you see data as recent as two days ago. The spot price hit a high of 125 euros on July 21st and a low of 4 on the 6th. (Remember, this is electricity that is trading on the market, NOT what utilities are charging their customers.)

Electricity production and spot prices in July 2014, with data up to July 24 -  Courtesy Fraunhofer ISE

Electricity production and spot prices in July 2014, with data up to July 24, Note peak on July 21 – Courtesy Fraunhofer ISE

What I really wanted to see was the times that electricity was actually selling for less than 0. I found isolated days in March, April, and May.

Electricity production and spot prices in May 2014

Electricity production and spot prices in May 2014, note price dropping below zero May 11 – Courtesy Fraunhofer ISE

There is also an online tool at the EEX Transparency Platform that allows you to watch today’s energy mix. There is supposed to be a two-hour delay, but the most recent data is from 6:00 and it would be 9:30 right now.

Actual Production July 26 until 7 pm - Courtesy Fraunhofer ISE

Actual Production July 26 until 7 pm – Courtesy EEX Transparency Platform

Germany started receiving solar energy at 7 am this morning. The output reached 5,068 MW by 8 am and was over 10,000 MW for seven hours. At the height, recorded at both 12:00 and 1:00 pm, there was more than 17,000 MW.

The conventional energy supply dipped below 31,000 MW during the high point, but was mostly between 31,000 and 32,000 during those seven hours of strong sunlight.

Another graph displays the expected wind energy for today. As you can see from the graph, it neatly complements today’s solar. Wind energy will be strongest tonight, when there is no sun.

Expected wind power generation - Courtesy EXX

Expected wind power generation – Courtesy EXX

“Our graphs of electricity production are very popular: for one, because we collect the data from several neutral sources and secondly because we continually update the time series data promptly,” reports Professor Bruno Burger, who heads Fraunhofer ISE’s data collection department.

I am impressed. 
 
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About the Author

is the President of Cortes Community Radio , CKTZ 89.5 FM, where he has hosted a half hour program since 2014, and editor of the Cortes Currents (formerly the ECOreport), a website dedicated to exploring how our lifestyle choices and technologies affect the West Coast of British Columbia. He writes for both writes for both Clean Technica and PlanetSave on Important Media. He is a research junkie who has written over 2,000 articles since he was first published in 1982. Roy lives on Cortes Island, BC, Canada.



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