Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

CleanTechnica

Policy & Politics

SolarCity and SunRun vs Arizona Department Of Revenue

Originally Published inte ECOreport

Solar Panels atop Buildings in Tucson, AZ – photo by David Crummey, CC by SA 2.0

Another obstacle to the growth of rooftop solar has arisen in Arizona. The Arizona Department of Revenue (ADOR) claims that solar energy equipment is taxable if it is owned by a solar company and installed on another person’s property. They have assigned a value for property tax purposes at 20% of its depreciated cost, which amounts to about $152 a year for an average solar customer. This has prompted a lawsuit: SolarCity and SunRun vs the Arizona Department of Revenue.

As 85-90% of the state’s rooftop solar installations are leased, rather than owned, this new tax could have a strong negative impact.

The Arizona state department seems to perceive solar panels as small power plants providing electricity to homeowners or businesses.

In their writ, the solar companies lawyers pointed out that their clients are not in the business of “generating, transmitting or distributing electricity to customers.” They lease equipment that allows the customer to generate their own electricity.

“ … The Arizona Legislature has made it clear that the Subject Property, when used “primarily for on-site consumption” of the electricity generated by such property, is “considered to have no value and to add no value” to the property on which it is installed, and thus it should not be separately assessed for property tax purposes. Specifically, A.R.S. §42-11054(C)(2) provides:

“Solar energy devices, as defined in section 44-1761, grid-tied photovoltaic systems and any other device or system designed for the production of solar energy primarily for on-site consumption are considered to have no value and to add no value to the property on which such device or system is installed.”

A spokesperson for SunRun said she believes “the Arizona Department of Revenue’s interpretation is illegal.”

“As with any additional cost, it would reduce Arizonans’ ability to turn to an alternative to Arizona Public Service in order to save money on monthly electricity bills, and would reduce rooftop solar’s addressable market,” SolarCity Director of Public Affairs Will Craven told pv magazine.

 
Don't want to miss a cleantech story? Sign up for daily news updates from CleanTechnica on email. Or follow us on Google News!
 

Have a tip for CleanTechnica, want to advertise, or want to suggest a guest for our CleanTech Talk podcast? Contact us here.
Advertisement
 
 

Written By

is the President of Cortes Community Radio , CKTZ 89.5 FM, where he has hosted a half hour program since 2014, and editor of the Cortes Currents (formerly the ECOreport), a website dedicated to exploring how our lifestyle choices and technologies affect the West Coast of British Columbia. He writes for both writes for both Clean Technica and PlanetSave on Important Media. He is a research junkie who has written over 2,000 articles since he was first published in 1982. Roy lives on Cortes Island, BC, Canada.

Comments

You May Also Like

Clean Power

Virtual power plants were virtually unknown just a few years ago, and now the floodgates are open thanks in part to a Trump-era ruling.

Clean Transport

Last year, I shared details that came out of an online Arizona DOT meeting about its plan for federal Infrastructure Bill funds, also known...

Clean Transport

An answer to the mystery of the disappearing Ford F-150 Lightning electric pickup trucks may lie within the fleets.

Clean Power

JA Solar announces plans to invest $60 million in a new Phoenix solar panel plant that will create more than 600 new jobs.

Copyright © 2023 CleanTechnica. The content produced by this site is for entertainment purposes only. Opinions and comments published on this site may not be sanctioned by and do not necessarily represent the views of CleanTechnica, its owners, sponsors, affiliates, or subsidiaries.