Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

CleanTechnica

Clean Power

Largest Solar PV Power Plant In Latin America In The Works In Mexico

This article was originally published on Solar Love.

A new 30 MW solar photovoltaic power plant is currently being constructed in Mexico — in La Paz, Baja California Sur. Once completed, the plant will be Latin America’s largest photovoltaic solar power plant, providing enough electricity to power an estimated 160,000 households.

Photo Credit: austinhk / Foter.com / CC BY-NC-ND

Photo Credit: austinhk / Foter.com / CC BY-NC-ND


The plant is being built by Martifer Solar, a subsidiary of Martifer SGPS. The company is responsible for all of the engineering and construction, and will also provide operation and maintenance services after the plant is completed. The plant is being funded by the local development bank Nafin, with further assistance from International Finance Corporation and Corporación Aura Solar.

The solar power plant, situated on a large 100-hectare site, will feature about 132,000 modules installed on single-axis trackers once completed — generating about 82 GWh/year and offsetting around 60,000 tons of CO2 emissions. It is currently scheduled to be completed by August 2013.

The project will be the first utility-scale solar project under a Power Purchase Agreement contract (20 years long) between a private company and Comisión Federal de Electricidad, Mexico’s federal power company, and also represents a big increase in total solar capacity for the country.

“Martifer Solar’s experience and worldwide track-record were decisive during the analysis of the different proposals made by the main companies in the sector. Due to its dimension, this project in Mexico will open the way for the development of the photovoltaic sector in the country, where, to date, were installed 13 MW of PV projects”, says Hector Olea, CEO of Gauss Energía, a Mexican company specialized in project development in the energy sector, in the press release.

Mexico has enormous potential with regards to solar energy — 70% of the country has an insolation of greater than 4.5 kWh/m²/day. What that means is that by “using 15% efficient photovoltaics, a square 25 km (16 mi) on each side in the state of Chihuahua or the Sonoran Desert (0.01% of Mexico) could supply all of Mexico’s electricity.” It’s currently predicted that the country will experience a solar power boom in the coming years, likely allowing it to reach its goal of receiving 35% of its energy from renewable sources by 2026.

 
Appreciate CleanTechnica’s originality? Consider becoming a CleanTechnica Member, Supporter, Technician, or Ambassador — or a patron on Patreon.
 
 

Advertisement
 
Have a tip for CleanTechnica, want to advertise, or want to suggest a guest for our CleanTech Talk podcast? Contact us here.

Written By

James Ayre's background is predominantly in geopolitics and history, but he has an obsessive interest in pretty much everything. After an early life spent in the Imperial Free City of Dortmund, James followed the river Ruhr to Cofbuokheim, where he attended the University of Astnide. And where he also briefly considered entering the coal mining business. He currently writes for a living, on a broad variety of subjects, ranging from science, to politics, to military history, to renewable energy.

Comments

You May Also Like

Fossil Fuels

By Kristina Dahl  Last week I had the opportunity to testify at a hearing on “What More Gulf of Mexico Oil and Gas Leasing Means for Achieving...

Cap And Trade

The following is an excerpt from a new CleanTechnica report, The Carbon Cure: Effective Actions to Combat Climate Change through Carbon Markets. For more on the types of...

Buildings

Originally published on WRI’s Resource Institute Insights Blog. By Madeleine Galvin and Anne Maassen  Monterrey, like other major Mexican cities, rapidly expanded outward during the end of the...

Cars

Audi recently announced that it wants to cut its water consumption in half by 2035. That’s a much bigger task than it sounds like,...

Copyright © 2021 CleanTechnica. The content produced by this site is for entertainment purposes only. Opinions and comments published on this site may not be sanctioned by and do not necessarily represent the views of CleanTechnica, its owners, sponsors, affiliates, or subsidiaries.