Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

CleanTechnica

Coal

Coal Plants Out Of Style In Germany

coal power plants germanyGermany’s renewable energy revolution is a big deal. It gives people in other countries more hope that they can implement the same (and several countries and cities have done so to some degree or another). It busts myths about renewable energy. It has brought down the cost of solar PV around the world. It is shifting the balance of power (social power and electricity) within Germany. And it is keeping more of Germany’s wealth within its borders.

However, it is also threatening established, rich industries — such as the utility industry, the coal industry, and the nuclear industry.

Of course, the utility industry uses propaganda about costs and reliability in order to try to save its skin; the coal industry uses propaganda about costs, reliability, and the “lack of need” for low-carbon power sources; and the nuclear industry uses propaganda about reliability and CO2 pollution from coal-fired power plants.

Dr. Karl-Friedrich Lenz has coined an interesting label for the few remaining fossil fuel and nuclear propagandists — Fossil Nukes. Many of these people are genuine believers in the agendas they push. Unfortunately, they continually make very odd claims that don’t fit the facts.

Last week, Dr. Lenz decided to debunk one of the most widely cited claims from the Fossil Nuke bathing pool, that Germany’s starting up a record amount of coal power plants to deal with the country’s nuclear phaseout. He also references the always insightful Craig Morris, a Bloomberg article the Fossil Nuke he was debunking had referenced, and Friends of the Earth Germany in the process. Here’s part of that:

As explained for example here by Craig Morris, it takes substantially more than two years to build a new coal power plant. Even if, as Barry Brook seems to think, the German government had decided to build lots of new coal as compensation for shutting down nuclear right after the Fukushima accident two years ago, none of those plants could be “started up” this year.

The article cited by Brook nowhere says anything to base the “due to nuclear closure” claim on. But it does contain this:

“The growth in renewables and the decline in power consumption have already fully bridged the gap opened by the shutdowns of the eight nuclear reactors in 2011,” Norbert Allnoch, head of the IWR, said in today’s statement.

You wouldn’t know that from reading Brook, of course.

With regards to Friends of the Earth, Dr. Lenz notes that the organization proudly boasts about the high number of coal power plants that it has gotten shut down, as well as the targeted remaining coal power plants.

They claim to have stopped 20 coal projects, with only much less still left standing, in their latest overview from last November. Here is a map from their website showing all the cancelled projects:

coal power plants germany

The issue with the few new coal power plants that are actually going up, as I understand it, is simply this: there are a lot of old coal power plants in Germany that need to be shut down, and some of them are being replaced by new coal power plants (but most are not).

 
Appreciate CleanTechnica’s originality and cleantech news coverage? Consider becoming a CleanTechnica Member, Supporter, Technician, or Ambassador — or a patron on Patreon.
 

Don't want to miss a cleantech story? Sign up for daily news updates from CleanTechnica on email. Or follow us on Google News!
 

Have a tip for CleanTechnica, want to advertise, or want to suggest a guest for our CleanTech Talk podcast? Contact us here.
Advertisement
 
Written By

Zach is tryin' to help society help itself one word at a time. He spends most of his time here on CleanTechnica as its director, chief editor, and CEO. Zach is recognized globally as an electric vehicle, solar energy, and energy storage expert. He has presented about cleantech at conferences in India, the UAE, Ukraine, Poland, Germany, the Netherlands, the USA, Canada, and Curaçao. Zach has long-term investments in Tesla [TSLA], NIO [NIO], Xpeng [XPEV], Ford [F], ChargePoint [CHPT], Amazon [AMZN], Piedmont Lithium [PLL], Lithium Americas [LAC], Albemarle Corporation [ALB], Nouveau Monde Graphite [NMGRF], Talon Metals [TLOFF], Arclight Clean Transition Corp [ACTC], and Starbucks [SBUX]. But he does not offer (explicitly or implicitly) investment advice of any sort.

Comments

You May Also Like

Fossil Fuels

Russia’s natural gas exports by pipeline to the European Union (EU) and the United Kingdom (UK) declined by almost 40% during the first seven...

Cars

Germany, Europe’s largest auto market, saw plugin electric vehicles take 25.5% share in July. This up from 22.6% year on year. Overall auto market...

Clean Transport

Tesla has added a new interesting attraction to a Supercharger station in Hilden, Germany — a mobile swimming pool. This is a small rectangular...

Cars

BYD is making plans to expand its presence in Europe by being part of the Paris auto show and ordering new car-carrying ships.

Copyright © 2021 CleanTechnica. The content produced by this site is for entertainment purposes only. Opinions and comments published on this site may not be sanctioned by and do not necessarily represent the views of CleanTechnica, its owners, sponsors, affiliates, or subsidiaries.