Cars

Published on October 1st, 2012 | by James Ayre

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Nissan Evalia, 7-Seat Electric Van to be Released in Europe

October 1st, 2012 by  

 
Nissan recently unveiled a new 7-seat electric van for the European market at the Paris Auto Show debut (slightly different from the Nissan electric van we published on in May). The Nissan Evalia electric van with its spacious design seating for seven people is being targeted at small business owners and ‘soccer moms’. The 6 kW of onboard energy gives the vehicle a lot of potential for small business owners who need portable power.

“Based on the e-NV200 concept, the newly-named Nissan Evalia Electric van will utilize the same drivetrain as the Nissan Leaf. While the Japanese automaker hasn’t released range numbers, they did say that the fast-charging plug will allow an 80% charge in just 30 minutes. Nissan is also touting that 6 kW of onboard energy that can be tapped by business owners who need a portable source of power.”


 
A new version of the Nissan Leaf’s battery is predicted to debut with the Evalia, improving or at least equaling the range of the Leaf. For small business owners looking to cut back on their fossil fuel use and save some money on gas, the Evalia should make a great around-the-town type of vehicle.

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There hasn’t been any notice yet whether or not Nissan will offer the all-electric vehicle for sale in the U.S.; though it seems that it would be a mistake not to — there is certainly a potential market there.

Source: Gas2
Image Credits: Green Car Reports





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About the Author

's background is predominantly in geopolitics and history, but he has an obsessive interest in pretty much everything. After an early life spent in the Imperial Free City of Dortmund, James followed the river Ruhr to Cofbuokheim, where he attended the University of Astnide. And where he also briefly considered entering the coal mining business. He currently writes for a living, on a broad variety of subjects, ranging from science, to politics, to military history, to renewable energy. You can follow his work on Google+.



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