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Japan’s First Floating Wind Farm Gets Going

 
Add Japan to the list of countries setting up innovative wind farms. On Wednesday, Japan’s first floating wind turbine began operation about half a mile off the coat of the Nagasaki prefecture. The 100-kilowatt turbine will be replaced with a 2-megawatt turbine next summer, once data regarding performance and maintenance is collected.

After the 2011 Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster and subsequent multi-reactor shutdown, government officials are looking for safer, cleaner forms of energy. Wind energy is clearly one of those. And given that all of Japan’s wind farms held up fine to last year’s earthquake and tsunami, it’s no wonder the country is turning more to wind.

Source: UPI Asia
Image: DJ Mattaar via Shutterstock

 
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Written By

is a former newspaper reporter who has spent the past few years teaching English in Poland, Finland and Japan. When she wasn't teaching or writing, Chelsea was traveling Europe and Asia, sampling spicy street food along the way.

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