Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

CleanTechnica
In just over a year, Gamesa and Iberdrola have brought Central America's largest wind farm online -- the 102 MW Cerro de Hula wind farm outside of the Honduran capital of Tegucigalpa. Some 36% of Hondurans do not have access to electrical power. Cerro de Hula is projected to boost Honduran generation capacity by 10%.

Clean Power

Gamesa, Iberdrola Bring Central America’s Largest Wind Farm Online

In just over a year, Gamesa and Iberdrola have brought Central America’s largest wind farm online — the 102 MW Cerro de Hula wind farm outside of the Honduran capital of Tegucigalpa. Some 36% of Hondurans do not have access to electrical power. Cerro de Hula is projected to boost Honduran generation capacity by 10%.


Photo courtesy Gamesa

Gamesa and Iberdrola Renewables have brought the 102-MW Cerro de Hula wind farm in Honduras online for owner Mesoamerica Energy. The largest wind farm in Central America, Cerro de Hula will boost Honduran electricity generation capacity by 10% — in a country where an estimated 36% of residents do not have access to electrical power.

The Cerro de Hula project demonstrates one of the key advantages of modern, distributed wind, solar and renewable energy systems: they can be deployed quickly and efficiently. With a $200-million investment, it took just over one year to build and bring the Cerro de Hula wind farm online. Honduran President Porfirio Lobo Sousa laid the wind farm’s foundation stone in late January 2011, joined by the Spain and US ambassadors and project partners to mark the occasion.

Timelapse of Turbine blade assembly, Cerro de Hula from Energia Eolica de Honduras on Vimeo.

Multinational Wind Power Project Development

Built as per a turnkey contract for owner Mesoamerica Energy, a total of 51 Gamesa G87 2-MW wind turbines are now up and running at the Cerro de Hula site, 24 kms (~14 miles) south of the Honduran capital of Tegucigalpa. The contract includes the provision of maintenance services for two years following start-up.

Honduras’ state-owned grid operator Empresa Nacional de Energia Electrica will take up and distribute Cerro de Hula’s electricity output under the terms of a 20-year power purchase agreement (PPA). Investment funding was provided by the US Export-Import Bank and the Central American Bank for Economic Integration.

Gamesa and Iberdrola were awarded the contract to build Cerro de Hula in August 2010, with Gamesa controlling 76% of the venture. The first wind turbine was installed in July last year.

 
Appreciate CleanTechnica’s originality? Consider becoming a CleanTechnica Member, Supporter, Technician, or Ambassador — or a patron on Patreon.
 
 

Advertisement
 
Have a tip for CleanTechnica, want to advertise, or want to suggest a guest for our CleanTech Talk podcast? Contact us here.

Written By

I've been reporting and writing on a wide range of topics at the nexus of economics, technology, ecology/environment and society for some five years now. Whether in Asia-Pacific, Europe, the Americas, Africa or the Middle East, issues related to these broad topical areas pose tremendous opportunities, as well as challenges, and define the quality of our lives, as well as our relationship to the natural environment.

Comments

You May Also Like

Clean Power

The company signed orders totaling 260 MW in the final quarter of FY20 (June-September), adding to the 150 MW closed in the first three-quarters...

Clean Power

Did we really expect Siemens Gamesa to come out of the gate so strong so fast? Either way, let's dive into the new wind...

Clean Power

Danish wind turbine manufacturer Vestas managed to hold on to its spot as the world's leading wind turbine manufacturer in 2017, but its recent...

Clean Power

Siemens Gamesa, the world's second-largest wind turbine manufacturer, announced this week that it is expanding its solar business, after successfully securing an order to provide...

Copyright © 2021 CleanTechnica. The content produced by this site is for entertainment purposes only. Opinions and comments published on this site may not be sanctioned by and do not necessarily represent the views of CleanTechnica, its owners, sponsors, affiliates, or subsidiaries.