Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

CleanTechnica
This engine designed by Peter Dearman runs on liquid air and leaves no carbon footprint from the exhaust pipe. This means it can compete with hydrogen and electric in the world of zero emissions – all positive news on the renewable energy transportation front.

Biofuels

Clean Motor Power via the Liquid Air Engine from Dearman

This engine designed by Peter Dearman runs on liquid air and leaves no carbon footprint from the exhaust pipe. This means it can compete with hydrogen and electric in the world of zero emissions – all positive news on the renewable energy transportation front.

This engine, designed by Peter Dearman, runs on liquid air and leaves no carbon footprint from the exhaust pipe. This means it can compete with hydrogen and electric vehicles in the world of zero emissions – all positive news on the renewable energy transportation front.

Now comes the task of finding out how much it costs to feed this engine through injecting it with cryogenic (liquid) air. Yesterday, the respected British engineering consultancy Ricardo validated the commercial potential of Dearman engine technology. The engine operates by injecting cryogenic air into ambient heat inside the engine to produce a high-pressure gas that drives the engine, where hydrogen exhaust leaves water vapor, Dearman’s exhaust emits cold air.

Ricardo’s research endeavor hopes to verify the engine is cheaper to build than battery-electric or fuel-cell technology and that the engine is  commercially viable proposition.

Peter Dearman

The Dearman engine operates without a spark plug, with cryogenic liquid air injected instead of petroleum. There isn’t any combustion but the air is stored at cryogenic temperatures (sub minus 160 degrees Celsius).

As the Dearman engine website explains:

“This is a zero emission engine that we believe can be lower cost than other alternative solutions, whilst offering highly competitive energy density and re-fuelling rates. It operates by vaporising liquid air with ambient heat to produce high pressure gas that drives the engine, with cold air as the only exhaust.”

For those wishing to see and hear Peter Dearman explain and demonstrate his technology, this video is worth the view:

http://youtu.be/11jlYBoyVls

According to the Dearman Engine Company, the technology operates through the controlled boiling of cryogenic liquids (e.g. air or nitrogen). If this boiling takes place in a confined space then, high-pressure gas can be produced that can be used to do the necessary work.

The website writes:

“Previous attempts to develop this technology involved large and heavy high pressure heat exchangers making it expensive and unsuitable for mobile applications.

“The Dearman Engine Company is exploiting a novel approach (patent granted) where the heat exchange process takes place inside the engine. Heat is provided by direct contact with a liquid heat exchange fluid. This step eliminates the heavy and expensive heat exchangers required previously.”

More power to them in the name of sustainability and climate stability.

Photo: Dearman Engine Company

 
 
Appreciate CleanTechnica’s originality and cleantech news coverage? Consider becoming a CleanTechnica Member, Supporter, Technician, or Ambassador — or a patron on Patreon.
 
Have a tip for CleanTechnica, want to advertise, or want to suggest a guest for our CleanTech Talk podcast? Contact us here.

Advertisement
 
Written By

is a writer, producer, and director. Meyers was editor and site director of Green Building Elements, a contributing writer for CleanTechnica, and is founder of Green Streets MediaTrain, a communications connection and eLearning hub. As an independent producer, he's been involved in the development, production and distribution of television and distance learning programs for both the education industry and corporate sector. He also is an avid gardener and loves sustainable innovation.

Comments

You May Also Like

Autonomous Vehicles

The global steel industry aims to carve out a bigger space for steel in the autonomous battery electric vehicle market of the future.

Air Quality

For those who follow the electric vehicle sector closely, it has been clear for several years that electric cars are far, far cleaner and...

Autonomous Vehicles

CleanTechnica's next Cleantech Revolution Tour is approaching, and it is packed with EV and clean energy leaders from around Europe. Starting in Berlin (Germany)...

Cars

Originally published on EV Obsession. Qualcomm’s Halo Wireless Electric Vehicle Charging technology has been licensed to the firm Ricardo with the intent for the...

Copyright © 2021 CleanTechnica. The content produced by this site is for entertainment purposes only. Opinions and comments published on this site may not be sanctioned by and do not necessarily represent the views of CleanTechnica, its owners, sponsors, affiliates, or subsidiaries.