Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

CleanTechnica
Hino Motors, best known for producing light trucks and cars (called kei trucks and kei cars in Japan), has more or less donated nearly 60 little trucks to the disaster relief efforts. The trucks they sent up there are their fairly new Dutro Hybrid [...]

Clean Transport

Disaster Zone Dutro — Hino Motors Sends Hybrids North for Rebuilding

Hino Motors, best known for producing light trucks and cars (called kei trucks and kei cars in Japan), has more or less donated nearly 60 little trucks to the disaster relief efforts. The trucks they sent up there are their fairly new Dutro Hybrid […]

Disaster Zone DutroThe northern part of Japan is still a disaster area – high levels of radiation, towns in ruins, and people displaced. More than eight months after the earthquake and exploding reactors, serious reconstruction efforts are under way. The rebuilding project is, among other things, an opportunity to display some altruism – and there are a few entities more than willing to make that leap.

Hino Motors, best known for producing light trucks and cars (called kei trucks and kei cars in Japan), has more or less donated nearly 60 little trucks to the disaster relief efforts. The trucks they sent up there are their fairly new Dutro Hybrid models.

Free Hybrids

Local governments in four prefectures benefit from Hino Motors’ generosity (13 trucks in Iwate, 20 trucks in Miyagi, 15 in Fukushima (yes, that’s the one with the exploded nuclear plant), and 10 trucks in Ibaraki). The trucks will stay with the local governments for a year at no cost, and when Hino Motors says no cost, they mean it. The company is not only sending the trucks themselves free of charge, but they’re also paying the cost of registration, maintenance, and fuel.

The cost of fuel, of course, is far lower for the diesel hybrids than it would be even for the standard Dutro; the little hybrids are about 50% more fuel efficient than a traditional diesel truck, making them ideal for a disaster area where resources are limited to begin with.

It’s no coincidence that Hino Motors gets to show off how well their trucks work in difficult circumstances as well as help the relief efforts – which makes it win/win all around in my book.

Source: Response.jp | Image: Hino Motors

 
Appreciate CleanTechnica’s originality? Consider becoming a CleanTechnica Member, Supporter, Technician, or Ambassador — or a patron on Patreon.
 
 

Advertisement
 
Have a tip for CleanTechnica, want to advertise, or want to suggest a guest for our CleanTech Talk podcast? Contact us here.

Written By

spent 7 years living in Germany and Japan, studying both languages extensively, doing translation and education with companies like Bosch, Nissan, Fuji Heavy, and others. Charis has a Bachelor of Science degree in biology and currently lives in Chicago, Illinois. She also believes that Janeway was the best Star Trek Captain.

Comments

You May Also Like

Clean Power

The wrath of the US solar industry is raining down upon an anonymous group of solar tariffs petitioners against unfair Chinese imports.

Clean Transport

The New York company Manhattan Beer Distributors will put five Volvo electric trucks to the acid test in New York City traffic, with an...

Clean Power

In the first part of this series, I projected and explained the plummeting hydrogen demand from petroleum refining and fertilizer, the biggest sources of...

Batteries

New energy storage technology is needed to kick the renewable energy revolution into high gear, and NASA-tested nickel-hydrogen batteries are (finally) in the running.

Copyright © 2021 CleanTechnica. The content produced by this site is for entertainment purposes only. Opinions and comments published on this site may not be sanctioned by and do not necessarily represent the views of CleanTechnica, its owners, sponsors, affiliates, or subsidiaries.