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In an analysis conducted by the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), the United States had a 72 percent increase in installations of wind energy from the previous year. In the first half of 2011 the U.S. installed 2,151 MW of wind energy compared to 1,250 MW in the same period of 2010.

Clean Power

U.S Wind Installations Top 2,000 MW in First Half of 2011

In an analysis conducted by the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), the United States had a 72 percent increase in installations of wind energy from the previous year. In the first half of 2011 the U.S. installed 2,151 MW of wind energy compared to 1,250 MW in the same period of 2010.

In an analysis conducted by the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), the United States had a 72 percent increase in installations of wind energy from the previous year in the first half of this year.

In the first half of 2011, the U.S. installed 2,151 MW of wind energy compared to 1,250 MW in the same period of 2010.

According to AWEA’s “U.S. Wind Industry Second Quarter Market Report 2011,” an additional 7,354 MW of new capacity was under construction as of July 1.

This includes 845 MW in Oregon; 802 MW in California; 769 MW in Oklahoma; 619 MW in Iowa; 611 MW in Illinois; 501 MW in Colorado and 492 MW in Texas.

The U.S. installed 1,033 MW in Q2 2011, up 46 percent from the same quarter last year. In total, the U.S. has installed 42,432 MW, with Texas leading in total installed wind capacity. Iowa, California, Minnesota, Illinois, Washington and Oregon complete the list of leading states.

California saw the most capacity installed in the second quarter with 420 MW. Oregon was second with 201 MW. Illinois with 150 MW, Utah with 102 MW and Ohio with 56.5 MW followed.

The AWEA did warn, however, that “without stable policy such as an extension of the Production Tax Credit, set to expire in 2012, the industry’s recovery will stall.”

It looks like the future of wind energy will be up to Congress, and its decision to extend the tax credit that is helping drive wind energy development or not.

If they let it expire, then we could see layoffs and even bankruptcies in American manufacturing plants and their supply chains.

Photo Credit: Duke Energy

 
 
 
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Written By

Tim holds an electronics engineering degree and is working toward a second degree in IT/web development. He enjoys renewable energy topics and has a passion for the environment. He is a part-time writer and web developer, full time husband and father.

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