Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

CleanTechnica
The U.S. Department of Energy has launched a $1.4 billion loan guarantee project to build 733 megawatts worth of solar panels, which is almost the equivalent of all the photovoltaic installations in the U.S. in 2010. The program will, called Project Amp, will also create more than 1,000 green jobs over a four-year installation period.

Clean Power

Giant $1.4 Billion Solar Project Will Almost Double Total U.S. Capacity from 2010

The U.S. Department of Energy has launched a $1.4 billion loan guarantee project to build 733 megawatts worth of solar panels, which is almost the equivalent of all the photovoltaic installations in the U.S. in 2010. The program will, called Project Amp, will also create more than 1,000 green jobs over a four-year installation period.

U.S. Department of Energy sponsors $1.4 billion rooftop solar power project called Project AmpThe U.S. Department of Energy has launched a $1.4 billion loan guarantee project to build 733 megawatts worth of solar panels, which is almost  the equivalent of all the photovoltaic installations in the U.S. in 2010. The program, called Project Amp, will also create more than 1,000 green jobs over a four-year installation period. What makes the program unique compared to other big solar programs is that instead of focusing on one giant standalone solar installation, Project Amp uses a distributed energy model involving 750 existing rooftops.

Standalone Solar Energy and Land Use

One obstacle for large standalone solar projects is the disruption of land that could be used for other purposes including nature conservation and farming. The U.S. EPA’s RE-Powering America’s Land alternative energy program provides one solution, which is to use abandoned Superfund sites and other classified lands for solar and wind installations. The Nature Conservancy also recently commissioned a wind power land use study suggesting that ample pre-developed sites exist for alternative energy installations.

Distributed Solar Energy

At least one major U.S. utility, Duke Energy, is becoming a huge fan of distributed rooftop solar power. In this model, the electricity generated by the individual installation does not supply the building directly. Instead, it is networked into the grid. This is the model that Project Amp will follow. Among the advantages, the distributed/grid model offers building owners the potential for offsite energy storage (particularly useful for facilities that operate at night) along with reliability of supply if something goes haywire on the roof. The grid model also offers a more attractive degree of energy security compared to large centralized power plants, which are vulnerable to natural disasters and other catastrophic circumstances.

Project Amp

The Department of Energy is relying on some heavy hitters for Project Amp. The 750 rooftops are all on buildings managed by the global industrial real estate developer Prologis, the solar panels will be installed by the leading energy company NRG, and financing is through Bank of America Merrill Lynch (yes, that Bank of America) The two-phase project will start in California, then move on to about 28 states and the District of Columbia.

Image: Rooftop solar power by Pink Dispatcher on Flickr.com

 
Appreciate CleanTechnica’s originality? Consider becoming a CleanTechnica Member, Supporter, Technician, or Ambassador — or a patron on Patreon.
 
 

Advertisement
 
Have a tip for CleanTechnica, want to advertise, or want to suggest a guest for our CleanTech Talk podcast? Contact us here.

Written By

Tina specializes in military and corporate sustainability, advanced technology, emerging materials, biofuels, and water and wastewater issues. Views expressed are her own. Follow her on Twitter @TinaMCasey and Google+.

Comments

#1 most loved electric vehicle, solar energy, and battery news & analysis site in the world.

 

Support our work today!

Power CleanTechnica: $3/Month

Tesla News Solar News EV News Data Reports

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Tesla News

EV Reviews

Home Efficiency

You May Also Like

Clean Power

Originally published by Union of Concerned Scientists, The Equation. By Jessica Collingsworth, the lead energy policy analyst and advocate for UCS’s Midwest office, in the...

Clean Power

The City is Estimated to See a $9.3 Million Reduction in its Annual Electricity Bill and an Estimated Total Savings of $65 Million Over...

Clean Power

Indian solar EPC company Mahindra Susten has received a major boost in its efforts to expand its footprint in the distributed solar market with...

Clean Power

West Virginia has called for a time-out in its four-year effort to rewrite solar net metering rules to the detriment of both solar hosts...

Copyright © 2021 CleanTechnica. The content produced by this site is for entertainment purposes only. Opinions and comments published on this site may not be sanctioned by and do not necessarily represent the views of CleanTechnica, its owners, sponsors, affiliates, or subsidiaries.