Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

CleanTechnica

Biofuels

Could Ohio Rival Finland With Heavy Industry Co-Generation?


By the end of 2011, an Ohio paper mill will have cut its coal power use by half, by more than 50,000 tons annually, by installing combined heat and power to generate its own electricity, according to Industry Week.Instead, it will sell its excess power to the grid.

Instead of coal, SMART Papers will power its own on-site electricity with boilers converted from coal-fired boilers to ones burning cellulosic fuel pellets made of the non-recyclable paper and biomass materials that it used to have to send to landfill. Any excess energy it makes can be sold to the grid, to clean up the heavily coal-dependent Ohio energy supply on the grid.

Last year, under its Democratic Governor Strickland, Ohio was one of the most recent states to pass a Renewable Energy Standard to get 25% of its power from “alternative” sources by 2025. This means only 12.5% has to come from renewable energy like wind or solar, for example.

But that very flexibility is a good thing for the many coal-dependent heavy industries in the state. Co-generation meets that “alternative” energy requirement. It cleans up heavy industry – normally reliant on coal power – and thus the grid.

The bill deviates from most state renewable energy requirements in that the standard allows for power produced from customer-located co-generation systems, which produce both heat and electricity and advanced waste-to-energy plants, such as the SMART paper mill project.

In Finland, the country depends on the electricity supplied by co-generation from companies like this one, that make forestry products and paper, for 30% of the electricity on the national grid.

Finland passed a law in the 1950s that utilities have to buy power from any entity that generates surplus power with co-generation. Now, heavy industry in Finland supplies almost one third of the country’s electricity – with co-gen.

Susan Kraemer@Twitter

 
Check out our brand new E-Bike Guide. If you're curious about electric bikes, this is the best place to start your e-mobility journey!
 
 
Appreciate CleanTechnica’s originality and cleantech news coverage? Consider becoming a CleanTechnica Member, Supporter, Technician, or Ambassador — or a patron on Patreon.
 
Have a tip for CleanTechnica, want to advertise, or want to suggest a guest for our CleanTech Talk podcast? Contact us here.

Advertisement
 
Written By

writes at CleanTechnica, CSP-Today and Renewable Energy World.  She has also been published at Wind Energy Update, Solar Plaza, Earthtechling PV-Insider , and GreenProphet, Ecoseed, NRDC OnEarth, MatterNetwork, Celsius, EnergyNow, and Scientific American. As a former serial entrepreneur in product design, Susan brings an innovator's perspective on inventing a carbon-constrained civilization: If necessity is the mother of invention, solving climate change is the mother of all necessities! As a lover of history and sci-fi, she enjoys chronicling the strange future we are creating in these interesting times.    Follow Susan on Twitter @dotcommodity.

Comments

You May Also Like

Batteries

Wärtsilä is a 180-year old company that pivoted through technology changes leading to engines for marine power and electricity, and is now a storage...

Climate Change

Creative agencies that work with fossil fuel corporations are getting more legal scrutiny than ever. The reality is so obvious: fossil fuel companies claim...

Carbon Pricing

A cogent and precise economic analysis concludes that we not only can -- we must turn away from coal and embrace renewable energy. It...

Clean Transport

The move toward economically and socially sustainable renewable energy is being smoothed by the recent participation of trade unions. How are unions in the...

Copyright © 2021 CleanTechnica. The content produced by this site is for entertainment purposes only. Opinions and comments published on this site may not be sanctioned by and do not necessarily represent the views of CleanTechnica, its owners, sponsors, affiliates, or subsidiaries.