Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

CleanTechnica

Climate Change

South Korea Shatters World Record With Gigantic Off-Shore Wind Farm


South Korea just announced the investment of $8.2 billion to build a gigantic 2,500 MW offshore wind farm, according to Wind Daily. It is part of a $36 billion investment to meet its targeted greenhouse gas reduction pledged after the Copenhagen Climate Accord.

At 2,500 MW, this simply dwarfs current offshore wind farms. Europe, the current world leader, now has offshore wind farms that are in the 300 – 400 MW range.

It is even more than twice the size of China’s recently announced gigantic 1,000 MW off-shore wind farm which holds the current world record for the largest planned offshore wind farm.

South Korea pledged a 30% reduction in greenhouse gases by 2020. To meet the target, it plans a total investment of $36 billion over the next five years.

The tiny but energy-intensive nation will spend the money in a public/private partnership to develop renewable energy sources to replace the oil and gas it now uses in electricity generation. The offshore wind farm is part of that at $8.2 billion.

The first step in the offshore wind farm will be the construction of a “proving area” by 2013 to test the first 20 of the 5 megawatt turbines that will be used throughout. Assuming all goes well, by 2016 it will comprise 900 MW, with 180 turbines. The final 300 turbines will be installed by 2019 to complete the 2,500 MW farm.

The nation’s first renewable energy standard was announced in September. It requires that large electric utilities (that supply more than 500 megawatts per hour) must source at least 10% of their electricity from renewable energy, like solar and wind, by 2022.

The US also just approved plans for its first offshore wind farm off the Massachusetts coast. Cape Wind will be a 300 MW farm and will use smaller 3.5 MW turbines supplied by the German company Siemens.

European companies rose to pre eminence in turbine production as a result of the EU-approved Kyoto Accord which phased in cap and trade legislation to reduce greenhouse gases by adopting and developing more renewable power.

[Update: correction. The UK plans a 10 times larger total of offshore wind projects by 2020 of 25,000 MW]

Image: Bill Meier
Susan Kraemer@Twitter

 
Appreciate CleanTechnica’s originality? Consider becoming a CleanTechnica Member, Supporter, Technician, or Ambassador — or a patron on Patreon.
 
 

Advertisement
 
Have a tip for CleanTechnica, want to advertise, or want to suggest a guest for our CleanTech Talk podcast? Contact us here.

Written By

writes at CleanTechnica, CSP-Today and Renewable Energy World.  She has also been published at Wind Energy Update, Solar Plaza, Earthtechling PV-Insider , and GreenProphet, Ecoseed, NRDC OnEarth, MatterNetwork, Celsius, EnergyNow, and Scientific American. As a former serial entrepreneur in product design, Susan brings an innovator's perspective on inventing a carbon-constrained civilization: If necessity is the mother of invention, solving climate change is the mother of all necessities! As a lover of history and sci-fi, she enjoys chronicling the strange future we are creating in these interesting times.    Follow Susan on Twitter @dotcommodity.

Comments

You May Also Like

Autonomous Vehicles

Elon Musk was invited to the 2021 World New Energy Vehicle Congress in Hainan, China. Although he didn’t attend in person, he did so...

Cars

Twitter user @JayInShanghai has shared an exclusive look inside Tesla’s largest delivery center in Asia — probably Tesla’s largest delivery center in the world....

Cars

CleanTechnica’s China sales monthly updates from Jose Pontes are part of the highlights of every month for me. That’s because I have always been...

Clean Transport

How Lessons Learned Around the Globe Can Accelerate the Electrification of Road Freight

Copyright © 2021 CleanTechnica. The content produced by this site is for entertainment purposes only. Opinions and comments published on this site may not be sanctioned by and do not necessarily represent the views of CleanTechnica, its owners, sponsors, affiliates, or subsidiaries.