Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

CleanTechnica
Researchers at North Carolina State University have developed a concept for an "artificial leaf" that generates solar energy, based on the same principles that occur in nature when plants draw energy from the sun. The new device is actually a flexible water-based gel combined with light-sensitive molecules.

Solar Energy

New “Solar Leaf” Mimics Nature to Produce Low Cost Energy

Researchers at North Carolina State University have developed a concept for an “artificial leaf” that generates solar energy, based on the same principles that occur in nature when plants draw energy from the sun. The new device is actually a flexible water-based gel combined with light-sensitive molecules.

NCSU researchers develop gel-filled artificial "leaf" that generates solar energyResearchers at North Carolina State University have developed a concept for an “artificial leaf” that generates solar energy, based on the same principles that occur in nature when plants draw energy from the sun. The new device is actually a flexible water-based gel combined with light-sensitive molecules. The molecules could be made synthetically, but the research team has used natural plant chlorophyll in the initial stages of the experiment, due to its potential for lowering costs and reducing the use of toxic materials in solar cells.

Solar Power, the Natural Way

When the gel-filled device is exposed to sunlight, the infused molecules react in a way that is similar to the reactions that occur in plants as chlorophyll converts solar energy into sugars. Electrodes in the device are coated with carbon nanotubes, carbon black or graphite, which are far less expensive than conventional platinum coatings. In terms of efficiency the device still has a long way to go, but the researchers foresee the potential for improvement by tweaking both the gel and the molecules. In addition, the researchers hope to replicate the self-regenerating mechanisms in plants. That leads to the possibility of low-cost installation and maintenance methods, as the solar gel could be “grown” on roofs and other surfaces.

Solar Energy and Chlorophyll

The focus on chlorophyll illustrates how the solar energy research field has expanded beyond silicon based solar cell technology, and this is just the tip of the iceberg. Some researchers are focusing on producing solar energy from phtalocyanines, which are common dyes that share the characteristics of chlorophyll. A team from Australia and Germany has also discovered an apparently new form of chlorophyll that can harvest light from more parts of the light spectrum, which could help in the development of new strains of algae for producing biofuel.

Image: Leaf by seeks2dream on flickr.com.

 
Appreciate CleanTechnica’s originality and cleantech news coverage? Consider becoming a CleanTechnica Member, Supporter, Technician, or Ambassador — or a patron on Patreon.
 

Don't want to miss a cleantech story? Sign up for daily news updates from CleanTechnica on email. Or follow us on Google News!
 

Have a tip for CleanTechnica, want to advertise, or want to suggest a guest for our CleanTech Talk podcast? Contact us here.
Advertisement
 
Written By

Tina specializes in military and corporate sustainability, advanced technology, emerging materials, biofuels, and water and wastewater issues. Views expressed are her own. Follow her on Twitter @TinaMCasey and Google+.

Comments

You May Also Like

Clean Power

64-panel solar array to provide 37,000 kWh annually for UNC Asheville Reuter Center CHARLOTTE, NC — Renu Energy Solutions, a locally-owned and operated solar...

Clean Power

Seasoned Waves to Water Prize competitors are developing novel, wave-powered desalination devices that can provide clean drinking water to coastal and island communities as...

Batteries

This fourth round of US DOE Solar Energy Technologies Office projects concerns solar–hydro hybrid power plants, other solar hybrid power plants, microgrids, grid storage...

Clean Power

The US is going all-in on a plan to dominate the global PV market with next-gen perovskite solar cells that can beat fossil fuels...

Copyright © 2021 CleanTechnica. The content produced by this site is for entertainment purposes only. Opinions and comments published on this site may not be sanctioned by and do not necessarily represent the views of CleanTechnica, its owners, sponsors, affiliates, or subsidiaries.