Offshore Wind Energy

Published on July 21st, 2008 | by Timothy B. Hurst

19

World's Largest Offshore Wind Farm Back on Track

July 21st, 2008 by  

offshore wind turbines

The world’s biggest offshore wind farm was revived yesterday when German-based energy group E.ON and the Danish utility Dong Energy agreed to acquire Shell’s 33% stake in the 1,000-megawatt London Array.

The two firms, which each own a one-third stake in the project will now become 50-50 partners by buying out Shell, the former third partner. Shell decided to withdraw from the London Array project back in May after a strategic review indicated that the project would not bring sufficient rates of return on the investment. Industry-wide cost inflation has raised the cost of the project to more than £2.5bn ($5 billion U.S.), well above the original estimates of £1.5bn three years ago.

The purchase came as a major relief for a British government that is lagging behind the pace it needs to keep for its renewable energy targets of 15% by 2020. The news also came on the day the biggest onshore wind farm in Europe – planned for Scotland – was given final approval.

There are currently 176 wind energy projects that would produce 2,546 megawatts currently in the planning stages across the UK – enough to supply electricity to 1.4 million British homes (British Wind Energy Association).

After much political opposition to the aesthetics of wind farms in the UK, is it safe to say there has been a significant shift in how British perceive the wind farms? Or is it out of economic rationality and political necessity that there is a push to expand the British wind energy portfolio?

Other posts about offshore wind:

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Photo Credit: © Rodiks | Dreamstime.com

Map Credit: BWEA


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About the Author

is the founder of ecopolitology and the executive editor at LiveOAK Media, a media network about the politics of energy and the environment, green business, cleantech, and green living. When not reading, writing, thinking or talking about environmental politics with anyone who will listen, Tim spends his time skiing in Colorado's high country, hiking with his dog, and getting dirty in his vegetable garden.



  • Sara Chukoian

    Interesting post. If implemented, this could be a big step forward in sustaining our environment. I am interested in learning more about this. As a person on board to save the environment, this is a very innovative way to do so. Great post, thank you for sharing!

    -Sara @GreenTravelReview

  • Reason for this i guess is a matter of space + weight.. For solar power you need a lot of surface.. covering for instance a windmill with solar panels, will just not give enough surface compared to the extra weight you add, so that extra weight would be much better used by just adding a bigger wind turbine instead.

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  • Dan

    Why not combine wind,wave, and solar into one offshore structure wouldn’t this be more cost effective? I envision a network of combination wind/wave towers connected with a solar canopy.

  • Dan

    Why not combine wind,wave, and solar into one offshore structure wouldn’t this be more cost effective? I envision a network of combination wind/wave towers connected with a solar canopy.

  • Dan

    Why not combine wind,wave, and solar into one offshore structure wouldn’t this be more cost effective? I envision a network of combination wind/wave towers connected with a solar canopy.

  • zam

    Really cool to see this technology. Environment friendly.

  • zam

    Really cool to see this technology. Environment friendly.

  • Very cool stuff…I have a feeling we’ll be seeing much more wind power in the US in the coming years!

  • Very cool stuff…I have a feeling we’ll be seeing much more wind power in the US in the coming years!

  • Very cool stuff…I have a feeling we’ll be seeing much more wind power in the US in the coming years!

  • John Watts

    Dude that is going to be so cool. Can you imagine.

    JT

    http://www.Ultimate-Anonymity.com

  • John Watts

    Dude that is going to be so cool. Can you imagine.

    JT

    http://www.Ultimate-Anonymity.com

  • Big thanks to those of you who pointed out the typo that read: “1.4 British homes,” when it should have read “1.4 million homes.” The post has been updated with the proper number. Thanks again for being so sharp and keeping us on our toes!

  • Big thanks to those of you who pointed out the typo that read: “1.4 British homes,” when it should have read “1.4 million homes.” The post has been updated with the proper number. Thanks again for being so sharp and keeping us on our toes!

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