Biofuels

Published on May 16th, 2008 | by Timothy B. Hurst

4

The Week in Cleantech News (5/12- 5/16)

May 16th, 2008 by  

cex.jpgFor those of you who are bettin’ folks, traders on the Chicago Climate Exchange view the Democrats as more bullish on cap-and-trade systems. So if you’re betting on a Democratic victory, you’ll want to buy those contracts now, in anticipation of a price spike on Nov. 5 (Politico).

Toyota Prius sales have topped 1 million and dealers in most markets simply can’t keep them on the shelves. Toyota says domestic inventory is limited by production capacity in Japan, which is shared by the Asian and European markets. The U.S. supply is at its lowest level in two years (Wired).

train_comicpie1.jpgImagine a high-speed train that could get you from San Francisco to Los Angeles in two hours forty minutes. Well, that dream is now one step closer to reality as the California High Speed Rail Authority has cleared environmental impact assessments and is beginning construction of what will be the most substantial high-speed rail network in the U.S. But don’t make travel arrangements just yet. The project is not scheduled to be completed until 2030 (gas 2.0).

A joint biofuel effort was announced Thursday involving Air Bus, JetBlue, Honeywell, and Aero Engines that plans to study ways to make commercial aviation fuels out of second-generation feedstocks such as algae (Green Tech Blog).

A new wave of nuclear power plants in the U.S. is likely to cost $5 billion to $12 billion a plant, two to four times previous estimates, driving up electricity bills for consumers and inevitably reigniting public concerns about the costs and benefits of nuclear power (The Wall St. Journal).cooling-tower-bistrosavage.jpg

Photo credits:

Karl Gunnarrsson via flickr Creative Commons License

compicpie via flickr Creative Commons License

Bistrosavage via flickr Creative Comons License


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About the Author

is the founder of ecopolitology and the executive editor at LiveOAK Media, a media network about the politics of energy and the environment, green business, cleantech, and green living. When not reading, writing, thinking or talking about environmental politics with anyone who will listen, Tim spends his time skiing in Colorado's high country, hiking with his dog, and getting dirty in his vegetable garden.



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  • One of the questions that has to be asked about the Wall Street Journal’s article about the cost of new nuclear power plants and the effect on consumer bills is – compared to what?

    The utilities that are applying for permission to build new plants, at least in the regulated rate of return states in the Southeast, are required to prove that they have carefully evaluated all options. They have to present their case to the appointed Public Utility Commissions and show why they believe they have made the most cost effective long term choice for supplying the reliable electricity that they have agreed to provide.

    The PUCs have a responsibility to the residents of the states where they live to ensure that electricity is not only cost effective, but also reliable.

    Short term solutions that cover a brief period of time can sometimes be made to look less costly, but they often ignore the uncertainties associated with the cost of fuel for competitive facilities.

    If you are an electrical customer living in a territory where there are nuclear power plants and fossil fuel power plants operating, take a good hard look at your electrical bill sometime. Note the fuel adjustment charges that are applied to the portion of the bill that is supplied by coal, oil or natural gas and trace the magnitude of that cost over a few years.

  • One of the questions that has to be asked about the Wall Street Journal’s article about the cost of new nuclear power plants and the effect on consumer bills is – compared to what?

    The utilities that are applying for permission to build new plants, at least in the regulated rate of return states in the Southeast, are required to prove that they have carefully evaluated all options. They have to present their case to the appointed Public Utility Commissions and show why they believe they have made the most cost effective long term choice for supplying the reliable electricity that they have agreed to provide.

    The PUCs have a responsibility to the residents of the states where they live to ensure that electricity is not only cost effective, but also reliable.

    Short term solutions that cover a brief period of time can sometimes be made to look less costly, but they often ignore the uncertainties associated with the cost of fuel for competitive facilities.

    If you are an electrical customer living in a territory where there are nuclear power plants and fossil fuel power plants operating, take a good hard look at your electrical bill sometime. Note the fuel adjustment charges that are applied to the portion of the bill that is supplied by coal, oil or natural gas and trace the magnitude of that cost over a few years.

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