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New Water-Cooled Supercomputer Will Use 40% Less Energy

socketthumbnail.jpegToday’s Chicago Tribune made a big fuss about a new water-cooled supercomputer at the University of Illinois. Yes, it will do massively more research, and yes, it will help researchers solve even more problems. But what really seems newsworthy, and which the reporter left to the last line of the article, is that the new IBM HydroCluster will use 40% less energy and 80% fewer air conditioners than air-cooled computers.

 
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Written By

Carol Gulyas is a leader in the renewable energy community in Illinois, where she serves as VP of the Board of the Illinois Solar Energy Association. Recently she co-founded EcoAchievers -- a provider of online education for the renewable energy and sustainable living community. She spent 18 years in the direct marketing industry in New York and Chicago, and is currently a teaching librarian at Columbia College Chicago. Carol grew up in a small town in central Indiana, then lived in the Pacific Northwest, Lima, Peru, and New York City. She is inspired by reducing energy consumption through the use of renewable energy, energy efficiency, and green building technology.

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